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March 07, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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f tt L. I C Tfi i G A N

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Local Accident Causes Death

Physicians at St. Joseph's Mercy

Hospital reported that Carl Gross, 25,
0 Pexter, died at 9:45 a.m. yesterday
of injuries suffered when his car
collided Saturday with a truck driven
by Oscar B. Wilcox of Tecumseh.
The accident occurred on Parker

Road, about eight miles west of Ann
Arbor. The Gross car was traveling
south when hit by the truck. The
car rolled over four times, after
which Gross was sped to the hospital.
by the sheriff's ambulance.

-'
Hearty
Welcome
To All
Students
5 ~ R
Start the Semester Right!
Come in and look around

U' Extension
Courses Are
Opened Here
Anumber of courses, which are
offered by the University Extension
Service, will be held in Ann Arbor.
Prof. Glenn D. McGeoch will in-.
struct a course in "Masterpieces in
Musical Literature," a 15-week course
which will begin at 7 p.m. tomorrow
and will be held in Rm. 206 Burton
Memorial Tower. Also known as Mu-
sic 42, it can be selected for either
auditor or two hours credit.
A non-credit sculpture course un-
der the direction of Avard Fairbanks,
will begin at 7 p.m. today in Rm. 403,
University Hall. A similar course in
painting and composition, under the
direction of Emil Weddige began
yesterday in Rm. 407 of the Archi-
tectural Building.
Prof. Julio del Toro will conduct!
Spanish courses for students who!
have had some work in the language.
A continuation course of Spanish la,
it will start at 7 p.m. today in Rm.
106 of the Romance Language Build-
ing. The similar Spanish 2a course
will start at 7 p.m. Thursday in the
same place.

ARussian army officer talks to cititzens of the Estonian Soviet Republic, who hid in the forest from
the Germans, according to the caption accompanying this picture received by radio from Moscow

Report...
(Continued from Page 1)

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN!

1111

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTOR

III!

. . rw rn.... ,

ATK I NSON'S PERFUME
1iade in Cngland

NARC I SSUS
LILY OF THE VALLEY
CARNAT ION
ATK INSON'S COLC
Iade in England

L I LAC
FREES IA
JASM I N

DGNE

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST and FOUND
BLACK and silver Parker 51 pen
lost before exam week, Faintly
engraved with "Marion Sipes." Re-
ward. Call 6662.
LOST-Blue angora gloves on cam-
pus a week ago Saturday. Re-
ward. Please call 24471.
$60 LOVELY cash Friday in U Hall,
University High School, or Michi-
gan League. Return to Room 1
U Hall or phone 5258. Reward.
LOST on campus Feb. 26-Brown
Schaeffer pen. Desperately needed.
Finder please return. Box 12.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claud Brown, 512 S. Main Street.

LAVENDER

WATER

COLD

MEDAL

possible on accountof limitations of
space and equipment."
Dean Alice C. Lloyd claimed in her
report on women's activities that
"the need for additional residence
halls for women . . . becomes more!
evident each year.
The International Center pro-
vided a "much needed ministry in
this time of world conflict" for
hundreds of students from foreign
lands, according to J. Raleigh Nel-
son, director of the Center. "World
conditions were promptly reflected
in the Center," he said, but "petty
Jealousies among the nationals dis-
appeared as acquaintance grew."
A total of 25 fires occurred on Uni-
versity property, the report stated,
resulting in a total loss of $1,578.37.
Almost half of these were attribut-
able to smokers' carelessness and the
majority of the fires occurred in
dormitories.
'I Debaters Meet
NYU Squad Today
Two members of the University
debate squad will meet a team from
New York University at 1:30 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 4003 Angell Hall, accord-
ing to Dr. Kenneth G. Hance, debate
coach.
Dorothy Murzek, '46, and Mar-
garet Farmer, '46, will speak on the
negative side of the question: "Re-
solved: That the United States
should cooperate in establishing an
international police force on the de-
feat of the Axis."
An audience-participation question
and answer session will be held at the
conclusion of the debate. The entire
program, being given before the Ar-
gumentation 127 class, is open to the
public.
MICHIGAN
NOW
..'O"'
vIiopr

Universities
Praised by
Marine 1-1;1 [Iid
Va~degrift Aseris
Force lau WN(apons
Lt. Gen. Alexander A. Vandegrift,
commandant of the U.S. Marine
Corps, lauded the cooperation given
the armed services by the universities
of the country last week when he
spoke on a radio symposium com-
memorating the 125thb a nniversary
of Colgate University.
Education Creates Weapons
Lt.-Gen. Vandegrift said that "ed-
ucation. . . _is a greter source of
fighting power than any material
weapon in existence, because educa-
tion is the force which creates mod-
ern weapons and iialifies men to
use them."
Speaking of the litit rsit'-traiinled
tmen and women who were able to
step directly into officer training
schools and specialirzedc training
units, he said that "if this reservoir
had not been available, our training
periods necessarily would have been
much longer, with a corresponding
delay in putting competent troops
into the field at a time when we
were in far greater danger, I be-
lieve. than most persons have ever
realized.
Universities Cooperated Quickly
"Although built upon, and dedi-
cated to, the arts and s cientces of
peace, our universities were among
the very first institutions to open
their facilities to the sci-%,icc when
the threat of war arose .. . Many,
not only provided invaluable facili-
ties, but rebuilt their whole academic
and administrative structures with
amazing celerity to fit the needs of
then ew programs," Lt. Gen. Vande-
grift said.
However, he made it clear that
academic achievement;daone was in-
sufficient training for leadership.
"The experiences of this war have
made it very clear that educators
who would equip their students to
participate, not only in civic progress,
but in the maintenance of national
security in an unpredictable world
must . . . place . . . emphasis on the
individual exercise of initiative, res-
ponsibility, character, physical vigor
and practical vision in evaluating
the world along with domestic af-
fr
War Prisoners To Work
CHICAGO, March 6.-UP)--Groups
of war prisoners will be used on
farms this summer in Illinois, Mihi-
gan and Wisconsin, Maj. Gen. Henry
S. Aurand, commanding officer of
the Sixth Service Command, revorted
today.

TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 1944
VOL. LIV No. 86
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:13
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
The Teachers Insurance and An-
nuity Association calls attention to
the following provisions for holders
War Workers Leave
Jobs To o Home
WASHINGTON, March 6.-UP)-A
new and serious war problem, the
Office of War Information reported
today, is that many workers who for-
merly rushed to crowded industrial
areas are now simply going home."
Although the OWI did not say so,
the inclination of workers -to go home
is being cited by the armed forces
as an argument for a national serv-
ice act. It also has stirred consider-
able concern in labor circles here.
Despite the out-migration problem,
the nation "quitting rate" in indus-
try was lower in December than in
any other month of 1943. On the
other hand, the rate of new hiring,
was the lowest since 1941.

of retirement annuity contracts,
concerning insurance contracts
plied for after Dec. 9, 1941:

and
ap-#

1. When the holder of a premium-
paying retirement annuity contract
enters a military, naval, or air force
of the United States, Canada, or
Newfoundland, he may cease prem-
ium payments on the contract with
the assurance that he may restore
the contract by simply resuming
payments (without payment of the
"omitted" premiums) if he does so
at the close of such service or within
six months thereafter. At that time
he will be expectedto sign an appro-
priate agreement as to reduction of
the contractual benefits correspond-
ing to the omitted premiums, and the
premium restumed will be on the
same actuarial basis as it would have
been if premiums had been paid con-
tinuously.
2. All new life insurance policies
applied for after Dec. 9, 1941, will
contain a provision excluding the
risk of death resulting either (a)
from service outside the continental
limits of the United States, Canada,
and Newfoundland in a military,
naval, or air force of a country at
war, or (b) from operating or riding
in any kind of aircraft, except as a
fare-paying passenger on scheduled
airline flights. In event of death
under such excluded circumstances,
the reserve under the policy, less any
indebtedness, will be payable to the
(Continued on Page 3)

MANICURE SETS for MEN
CALKIN'S - FLETCHER

2) rij,

St1ored

324 South State

818 South State

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