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April 16, 1944 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-04-16

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SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 144

THE MICIGAN DAILY

PAGE 1

1 1 V !Ll 1 V 11 1\ . .1 .L1 1 1J A

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Weather Cancels

Opening Baseball

Game,

Golf,

'<

Golf Matches
With U. of D.
Postponed
Meet Rescheduled for
This Week; Michigan
Squad Plays in Rain
Once again the weather kept the
Maize and Blue linskmen from the
course when the 18-hole match,
schedul'ed with the University of De-
troit yesterday, was called off due to
the wet course and constant rain.
This postponement is not perman-
ent, however, and Coach Ray Court-
right said last night that he expect-
ed to meet Detroit some afternoon
this week.
In spite of the unfavorable con-
ditions for golf some of the squad
went out yesterday in order to get in
some practice. As yet none of the
golfers feel that they have had a
chance to play enough to get in
shape before the season actually gets
under way.
Next Saturday the Michigan golf-
ers will meet Northwestern at Great
Lakes. This is an important match
since the Wildcats were runner's-up
for last year's Big Ten championship.
Bosox Beat Braves, 3-2
BOSTON, April 15.-(P)-The Bos-
ton Red Sox made it two in a row
today in the city series, beating the
National League Boston Braves, 3 to*
2.
The Red Sox's winning run came
in the sixth on a wild pitch by big
Jim Tobin.
A newcomer to the Red Sox, Bob
Johnson, drove in two of the Ameri-
can League runs and the Braves'
Butch Nieman brought in both of the
National Leaguers' Tallies.

ON THE REBOUND
by JoAn Peterson

TRUE philanthropy does not expect
to be recognized. Often philan-
thropists are known only to those
who benefit directly from the kind-
nesses thrown their way. More oft-
en than not, the men who have made
possible for the needy, things which
would otherwise have been entirely
inconceivable, are in no way reward-
ed except through their own satis-
faction in having done a fine thing.
Philanthropists from the world
of sport are some of the most mod-
est people to be found. Men who
have made substantial gains in
various sports fields have been
known to give the greater parts of
their fortunes to all manner of
organizations from Children's hos-
pitals to Greek Relief.
One outstanding case of a sports-
man with a philanthropic bent, is
that of Chick Evans, who in 1916, a
gangly, long-legged, self-conscious
youngster, made golfing history by
winning both the National Amateur
and National Open championships.
The young Chicagoan was promptly
deluged with offers to turn profes-
sional and cash in on his talent, but
Evans chose instead to remain in the
amateur ranks.
However, he did accept one of-
fer-to make a series of phono-
graph recordings on golf-the pro-
ceeds of which lbe turned over to
the Western Golf Association for
"the general advancement of cad-
dies."
Y 1930 the fund amounted to $12,-
000 and Evans decided to use it to
provide scholarships at Northwestern
University for deserving caddies.
To the original sum, additional
contributions amounting to $50,000
have been added by the WGA. Evans'
idea was heartily agreed to, and be-

ginning that year, those caddies who
showed outstanding merit were pre-
sented with scholarships.
Evans' little project would be
just one of those magnanimous pro-
grams that are easily forgotten,
and comparatively unknown, ex-
cept for the fact that we are now
at war-and Chick Evans, who has
no sons himself in the service, now
has 45 fighting men scattered all
over the fighting fronts who were
former Evans "boys" at the Uni-
versity,
The first two caddies selected for
Evans scholarships in 1930 are in the
service. One is a major in the Air
Service Command in India. The
other is a lieutenant in the Navy,
Other Evans boys serve in all the
branches of the Amed forces.
Chick Evans knew the boys who
went through on his scholarships.
He was their friend, but he didn't
want to be looked up to and ap-
preciated. He only hoped that
those men who went through
Northwestern on scholarships,
would be able to make something
of themselves that might other-
wise have been impossible. Today
Chick Evans' "boys" are doing him
proud. The idea of a former cad-
dy who won a couple of golf cham-
pionships in 1916 is paying divid-
ends. But not in money.
SPORTS SHORTS . ..
Events ran along without much
out of the way hapening until the
pole vault was won by a Northwest-
ern pole vaulter who cleared 11
feet.
Spectators who had been watching
the vaulter with marked interest no-
ticed' that the boy was competing
in his bare feet. Finally one puz-
zled fan spoke to Coach Frank Hill
and asked him what the reason for
this hillbilly exhibition. "Oh," Hill
remarked, "we don't issue shoes un-
til a fellow can make 12 feet."
This tale dates back to 1931 ati
the time of the annual coaches
convention in New York. A young
basketball coach, who was attend-
ing the convention for the first
time ,checked in at the hotel where
all the coaches were supposedly
staying. Many of them had check-
ed in already, but for some reason
they seemed to have completely
disappeared, leaving no indication
as to where they had gone.
Feeling slightly desolate, but de-
termined to take advantage of his
visit to Gotham the hardwood men-
tor decided to visit the Empire State
Building. It wasn't a bad hunch
either. When he got off the elevator
at the top floor he found each and
every one of the missing coaches ex-
citedly viewing the city sights through
telescopes.
Tigers To Open
Season Tuesday
Against Browns
DETROIT, April 15.-(IP)-The De-
troit Tigers, arriving home today af-
ter five weeks of spring training at
Evansville, Ind., will open their Am-
erican League season against the St.
Louis Browns Tuesday at Briggs Sta-
dium before an estimated 22,000
spectators.
General manager Jack Zeller said

Saginaw Wins
State Indoor
Track Carnival
Campbell Wins Three
Events; Osborn Sets
Record in Highjump
Saginaw's Arthur Hill high school
dethroned Ann Arbor of the River
Rouge State Invitational Indoor
Track championship when they
amassed a total of 37% points at the
fifth annual running of the meet.
Pontiac was second with 22% points
and Ann Arbor and Monroe tied for
third with 22.
The Saginaw high school scored its
points through team balance, count-
ing in almost all events. Their vic-
tory, however, was overshadowed by
a feat performed by Garion Camp-
bell of Monroe. This fleet-footed
young colored boy captured three
firsts in the 60-yard dash and the 65-
yard high and low hurdles. Previous-
ly in the afternoon preliminaries,
Campbell had placed first in his
heats of the respective events.
The only new meet record to be
broken was in the high jump when
Osborn of Saginaw Arthur Hill made
a leap of 6 feet and 1/4 inch to shat-
ter the old mark of 5 feet 11 3/8 inch-
es held jointly by Bender of Jackson
and Smith of Royal Oak.
The medley relay which consisted
of a 440, 880, 660, and 3/4 mile was
won by Dearborn while Ann Arbor
was victor in the 880-yard relay.
Winners of the other events were
Seerstra of Saginaw Eastern in the
440, Hill of Ferndale in the mile run,
and Kelley of Ferndale in the 880.
The other field championships were
earned by Vosberg of Pontiac in the
pole vault and Dick Lee of Ypsilanti
Central in the shot put.
The meet which is an annual affair
is sponsored by River Rouge Physical
Education Department. It was di-
rected by University of Michigan
coaches Ken Doherty and Chester
Stackhouse and was officiated by the
members of the Wolverine track
squad.
Curtis Breaks
NAIAU Record
SAN FRANCISCO, April 15.-(P)-
Ann Curtis, 18-year-old national
freestyle swimming champion, bet-
tered her own American record in the
440-yard freestyle event today at the
National A.A.U. women's swimming
and diving meet, covering the dis-
tance in 5 minutes 27.3 seconds. The
old mark was 5:27.8.
The San Francisco girl won by
nearly a lap and a quarter from her
nearest contender in the second heat
of the semi-finals, Marilyn Sahner
of New York, who was outdistanced
rapidlyvin the fourth lap after hold-
ing an early lead.
In the 100-yard backstroke semi-
finals, Suzanne Zimmerman, 18,
Multnomah Club of Portland, Ore.,
stroked to victory in 1:11.2. The sec-
ond heat was won by 15-year-old
Muriel Mellon, San Diego, in 1:13.3,
and the third by Betty Shields, 16,
New York, in 1:13.1.

Doubleheader Against
Ohio Club Raine Out
Nine To Meet Fort Custer in Twin Bill;
First Home Games To Be April 25-26

Trouble with the weather picked
up right where it left off last spring
as far as Michigan baseball is con-
cerned when the season's opener with
Oberlin, scheduled for yesterday af-
ternoon on the Ohio team's diamond,
was called off because of rain.
Owing to the cancellation, the
Wolverines will open against Fort
Custer Saturday in a double header
at the Army post field. The twin-bill
will also mark the 1944 debut of the
Custer nine.
Team Gets to Toledo
The Michigan travelling squad of
16 players got as far as Toledo yester-
day before receiving word that wea-
ther conditions at Oberlin would not
permit play. They then turned
around and headed back to Ann Ar-
bor.
The postponement was a distinct
blow to Coach Ray Fisher's chances
of bringing home his ninth Big Ten
clampionship in 24 seasons as head
mentor of baseball at Michigan. The
Wolverines open their Western Con-
ference schedule in a two-game home
series with Iowa, April 25, 26, and
need several games with non-Confer-
ence opponents in order to get into
top-notch condition. As matters now
stand, they will have only the two
tilts with Custer under their belts
when they take the field against the
Hawks.
Iowa Beaten by Badgers
Iowa has already played three.
games against Big Ten rivals, annex-
ing a pair from Chicago by lopsided
scores and dropping a 7-1 decision to
Wisconsin Friday.
Last season, Michigan was washed
out of 13 of 25 scheduled games and
managed to complete only five of 10
Big Ten tilts to wind up in fifth place
with a record of three wins against
two losses. Ohio State copped the
championship, winning six and losing
Smith Qualified
As Swimming
Instructor
BAINBRIDGE, Md., April 15.-(I')
-Second Class Seaman Bill Smith,
Hawaiian - born holder of seven
world's swimming records, reported
today at the physical instructors'
school at the Bainbridge Naval
Training Station.
After eight weeks training, the
19-year-old swimmer who has been
stationed at Great Lakes, will be
qualified for a specialist's A rating
and become one of the Navy's physi-
cal education instructors.
At the National AAU swimming
meet at Ann Arbor, Mich., April 1,
Smith, former Ohio State star, won
the 100 and 440-yard freestyle races
after establishing a new record in the
220 to fashion a triple win.

one. The Wolverine losses were to
Iowa and the Buckeyes.
Win Eight Non-Conference Games
Of the total games played includ-
ing non-Conference teams, Michigan
won eight and dropped four, beating
Iowa, Michigan State, Michigan Nor-
mal, and Selfridge Field. The Wol-
verines, in addition to the two Con-
ference tilts, lost to Western Michi-
gan and Fremont.
Cancelled games included two each
with Notre Dame, Indiana, Purdue,
and Grosse Ile Naval Base, and single
tilts with Ohio State, the Detroit Ti-
gers, Michigan State, Selfridge Field,
and Michigan Normal.
Cubs, White Sox

Matches
Notre Dame
Takes Two
From Indiana
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., April 15.-
(P)--Notre Dame made its 1944 base-
ball debut today by showing power
y at the plate and finesse afield to take
a doubleheader from Indiana Univer-
sity, 10 to 5 and 4 to 0.
The Irish got nine hits in the first
contest, but the wildness of Gene
Seifert, Indiana's only veteran hurl-
er, cost the Hoosiers a close game.
Bill Martin, a Navy trainee, shut
out Indiana in the second game with
only two hits.
At Chicago the game between Fort
Sheridan and the University of Chi-
cago was postponed.
Because of cold and wet weather
the contest between Iowa and Wis-
consin was called off. The two teams
played seven innings Friday before
the weather stopped them, and Wis-
consin came out on the long end of
a 7-1 score.
4 MONTH INTENSIVE
College Students and Graduates
Secretarial Course for
A thorough, intensive, secretarial
course - starting February, July,
October. Registration now open.
Regular day and evening school
throughout the year. Catalog.
A School of Business
Preferred by College Men and Women
THE GREGG COLLEGE
President, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.
6 N. Michigan Ave. Telephone STAte 1881
Chicago, IDl.

Resume

Series

CHICAGO, April 15.- (,) ')With
the "Mad Russian," Louis Novikoff.
finally on hand, the Chicago Cubs
today had hopes of upsetting their
American League city rivals, the
White Sox, when the teams resume
their spring schedules at Comiskey
Park tomorrow.
Today's game, scheduled for Wrig-
ley Field, was rained out. The Sox
lead two games to none in the local
phase of the series and 3-1 counting
two training camp tussels.
Paul Erickson will be the Cubs'
starting pitcher tomorrow, with Buck
Ross on the mound for the Sox.

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NOTE

Our new shipment includes:

MEADE "LUX"

LEWIS

ALBERT AMMONS

the advance sale indicated a crowd of
that size if the weather is favorable.
Two years ago the Tiger opener drew
39,267 fans, and last year's secondary
opener got a turnout of 17,943.
Opening day ceremony will follow
a familiar pattern. Mayor Edward J.
Jeffries, Jr., will toss the first pitch
and Gov. Kelly will attempt to catch
it. For the 42nd year, Finzel's band
wil be on the scene to furnish the
musical background.
The Tigers, whose exhibition game
record is seven victories, threegde-
feats and a tie, were rained out of a
scheduled game with the Pittsburgh
Pirates today at Briggs Stadium. The
two clubs will meet tomorrow with
Paul Trout, Hal Newhouser and rook-
ie Ruffus Gentry working three-inn-
ing assignments against Truett (Rip)
Sewell and giant Johnny Gee of
Pittsburgh.
Trout, a 20-game winner last sea-
son, will face the Browns in the open-
er, and Bob Swift will be behind the
plate. Paul Richards was to catch
the opening game, but he split his
hand in an exhibition game and
won't rejoin the club until Monday
after spending several days in Texas.

1
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jl

PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCE'
BIDU SAYAO, Metropolitan Opera .
ROSE BAMPTON, Metropolitan Opera . . .
THELMA VON EISENHAUER,
Chicago Civic Opera . . .
KERSTIN THORBORG, Metropolitan Opera
CHARLES KULLMAN, Metropolitan Opera
JOHN BROWNLEE, Metropolitan Opera
SALVATORE BACCALONI, Metropolitan Opera
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Russian Virtuoso . . .
GREGOR PIATIGORSKY, World Renowned
Performer . . . . . . . Vi
GENIA NEMENOFF
PIERRE LUBOSHUTZ . . . . . Two-Pi
EUGENE ORMANDY . . . . OrchestraI
SAUL CASTON . . . Associate OrchestraI
HARL McDONALD . . . Guest Orchestrat
HARDIN VAN DEURSEN . . . . Choral;
MARGUERITE HOOD . . . Youth Chorust

RTS
Soprano
Soprano
Soprano
Contralto
Tenor
Baritone
. Bass
Violinist
'oloncellist
ano Team
Conductor
Conductor
Conductor
Conductor
Conductor

PERFORMERS

JAMES P.

JOHNSON

EDMOND HALL

SIDNEY

CATLETT

Y}.z r .~
.:!, G1 f ** j
*,;/ Ole
K N'. "Vp

CxcV

J. C. H IGG I N BOTHAM
FRANK NEWTON
SIDNEY DE PARIS-
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OPEN MONDAY EVENINGS

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HIGH SPOTS
Symphonies: Mahler, "Das Lied Von der Erde"; Brahms, No.
1; Beethoven, No. 7; Mozart, No. 35; Tchaikovsky, No. 6.
Concertos: Brahms Concerto for violin and Violoncello;
McDonald Concerto for Two Pianos.
Choral Works: Songs of the Two Americas, orchestrated by
Eric DeLamarter (Youth Chorus) ; Mendelssohn's "Elijah"

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