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April 02, 1944 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-04-02

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GE six

TIHE- MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1944

I U

U' Broadcasts
Are Announced
The Methodist Church Choir under
the direction of Dr. Hardin A. Van
Deursen, will take part in the Hymns
for Victory program to be heard at
9:15 a.m. today over station WJR.
"The Heavens Are Telling" from
the Creation by Joseph Haydn and
several other selected Easter hymns
will be presented.
At 2:40 p.m. tomorrow, over the
same station, Professor L. D. Carr, of
the sociology department, and Pro-
fessor Waldo Abbot, director of the
Broadcasting Service, will debate up-
on the question of whether the Amer-
ican people are able effectively to
solve social problems, such as juven-
ile delinquency. Dr. Carr believes
that the nation has been caught un-
prepared to answer social questions
on many occasions, both in the past,
and in the present war emergency.

TRICKS AND PRANKS:
Zeta Barbour Will Portray
Tony in Goldsmith's Drama

Martha Cook
ill~ P)

I I irk W ,

Briggs Strikers
Resume Work

"She Stoops To Conquer," a story
of two love affairs and of Tony
Lumpkin, will be presented by Play
Production of the speech department
from April 12-15 at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Tony, the boisterous son of Mrs.
Hardcastle, will be portrayed by Zeta
Barbour who will be remembered for
her effective performance of Dromio
in "The Comedy of Errors."
Tony has been described as 'a
composition of tricks and mischief"
by his stepfather, but his mother,
striving to excuse him, says he is on-
ly a "poor, consumptive fellow merely
possessing a sense of humor."
The tricks and pranks that Tony
plays on his friends are many and

varied. One of his most masterly is
that of directing two gentlemen,
Marlow and Hastings, to the Hard-
castle home, and telling them that

w 11 resent f #A V 4 U - .T-4 U 4 a
Music Progyram
At the State . .. At the Michigan .,.
Women of Martha Cook will pre- The new picture opening today at John Steinbeck's "Lifeboat" is an
sent a program of typically Ameri- the State is "Government Girl," a interpretation of the experiences
can music including both voice and
instrumental selections at 7:30 p.m. presentation of the hectic life in the of nine people adrift in the open
today at the International Center. nation's capital. sea.
The program has been arranged by Olivia de Havilland in the title role The entire action in this film, op-
Mrs. Leona Diekema, social director portrays a conscientious secretary ening at the Michigan today, I takes
of the Martha Cook, and George Hall, and is teamed with Sonny Tufts, the place in one boat.
assistnt te irector of the Inter- business executive who comes to This production by Alfred Hitch-
national Center. It will be directed
by Marjorie Gould, '44SM. Washington as a dollar-a-year man. cock presents a characterization by
"The Star Spangled Banner," and The supporting cast includes Tallulah Bankhead, who makes her
"America" will be the opening and James Dunn, Anne Shirley, and Jane I return to the films in the present pic-
closing numbers. Others wil be songs Darwell. ture.
which depict various sections of the
country and two popular University
songs.
The first part of the program,
"Music America Likes To Sing," will
be presented by a chorus of girls from
Martha Cook accompanied by Pat
Potter, '44.IrN.. qh)1

r
3
1

DETROIT, April l.-/P)-After a
two-day work stoppage that made
several thousand workers idle, pro-
duction was resumed today at the
Briggs Manufacturing Company's
Outer Drive plant which makes ball
turrets for bombers.
Production was halted'for the sec-
on day at the Gyro Compass division
of the Chrysler Corporation's main
Dodge plant. A labor dispute was re-
sponsible for the strike, according to
a Company spokesman, who said that
the Compass, division was closed after
two balancers were sent home for re-
fusal to do work assigned them.

ZETA BARBOUR
. . plays Tony Lumpkin

]PRIORITY

s
CHI
k"
We have a new and lovely
selection of delicately sheer
crepe afternoon dresses any-
one of which you will be
proud to own. They come
in a variety of "dressy"
styles in:
Black ... Lilac
Delicate Powder Blue
Dark Blue . . . Grey
Look Smart -- Win His Heart

the house is an inn. The situations
which arise from this prank prove
both amusing and embarrassing and
set the pace for Goldsmith's comedy.
Tony has the "strength of a bull,
the appetite of a horse, and spends
his evenings at The Three Pigeons, a
tavern, where he is free to drink,
flirt, and play practical jokes.
"She Stoops To Conquer" is repre-
sentative of Goldsmith's interest in
rural England with its squires, roomy
inns and friendly hospitality.
Tickets will go on sale April 10 at
the Lydia Mendelssohn box office.
Mail orders are being accepted now.
Ruthven Marks Birthday
President Alexander G. Ruthven
celebrated his 62nd birthday yester-
day in New York where he is attend-
ing the annual meeting of the Alum-
ni Club of New York. He will return;
to Ann Arbor tomorrow night.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Life." A cost supper will be served.
The program will conclude in time
for servicemen to reach quarters for
evening muster.
Coning Events
Bacteriology Seminar will meet
Tuesday, April 4, at 4:30, Rm. 1564
East Medical Building. Subject:
"Current Investigations of Antibiotic
Substances." All interested are in-
vited.
Junior Research Club: The April
meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 4, in the Amphithea-
tre of the Rackham Building. The
program will be given by Elmon L.
Cataline of the School of Pharmacy
and by Frederick H. Test of the De-
partment of Zoology.
Michigan Youth for Democratic
Action will meet at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm. 316 of the Union. Dr. Francis
Skillman Onderdonk, author and lec-
turer, will discuss "From United
States to United Nations." Motion
pictures and lantern slides will be
shown, and a discussion period will
follow. Public is invited.

In the.second part, "Music Ameri-
ca Likes To Hear," Lucretia Dell, '46,
will play a piano solo and an ensem-
ble group with Dorothy DeVries, '44,
Carol Fries, '44SM, and Edith Hel-
berg, '44, will play several popular
American selections.
Refreshments will be available at
the snack hour which will follow the
program.
Hillel To Give
Film Program
Alfred Hitchcock's British made
"Secret Agent," will highlight a mo-
tion picture program to be presented
at 7:45 p.m. today at the Hillel
Foundation.
Other pictures to be shown on this
program are "The River," a docu-
mentary issued by the U.S. Office of
Education, as part of the Federal
Security Agency, and an old Charlie
Chaplin comedy, "The Floorwalker.
"The River," the story of the.Missis-
sippi, was produced some five years
ago and was shown in theatres
throughout the country, having run
at the New York World's Fair in
1939.

They're all talking about the

SUNDf4Y
North Lounge
Michigan Union

OCIDaL
Sunday 3 to 5

rA

Bombers, block-busters, torpedoes, tanks, guns, grenades, machine-guns are not the only
weapons the leaders of our Armed Forces use to win victory. They use-men-men who speak
different languages, who can question prisoners, get information from natives, read enemy
papers, diaries and documents, interpret in negotiations, understand enemy propaganda
and do a thousand vital services to insure victory.

j

r!

Co u sINS

4k

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218 SOU-1rii STATrE

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

ANN RBOR, MICIL

SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1944

erans in readjusting and
re-educating for civilian
life, 2. Religious education
and 3. International edu-
cation for the purpose of
learning to understand
other nations. Then, speak- r<
ing directly to Council Y
members, "You're not re-
sponsible .for the terrible
:mess that the world is in
now, but unfortunately
you're going to inherit the
troubles ... problems must
be solved by you or not at
all."

'U' TRACK TEAM in the
university division of the
second annual Purdue Re-
lays, climax of the indoor
track season, scored in all
but one event for a total of
49 points. Notre Dame, last
year's winner, got only 17
1-3 points for fifth place.
Purdue took second place
with Illinois close behind.
* * *
'U' SWIMMERS tried
hard, got second place in
team standings. Main rea-
son was Alan Ford of Yale.
He made the 100-yard free-
style in world's record time
of 49.7 seconds, won for
himself the American

permanent world govern-
ment." As for the flag, "I
believe that many Ameri-
cans today pay too little
attention to the concepts
of the United Nations, and
I thought that a symbol,
such as this flag, would
help arouse more interest
in the United Nations."
Architect, author and lec-
turer on international af-
fairs, Dr. Onderdonk will
speak soon on "From Unit-
ed States to United Na-
tions" at a meeting of
Michigan Youth for Demo-
cratic Action.
*1 * *
TAYLOR HENRY, Asso-
ciated Press correspondent,
who recently returned on
the Gripsholm after in-
ternment in Germany,
spoke in Ann Arbor last
week. "The 12,000,;000
members of Germany's
slave army may prove an
'Achilles Heel' to the Naz-
is," he said, and, "in the
event of a German collapse
these people are going to
take the most ghastly re-
venge known in human
history." He said German
morale is still "good," that
"our air raids are doing

In yo
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tuniti
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$PAs9 L BlGA who
t and
~OV~.P2$A You I
.ARAfIC folio
osan* surasseLIN(
tROsWsiAN AAAN A faci
Lingua
SW AUA.........millinn

ANOTHER LANGUAGE quickly, easily, correctly
LINGUAPHONE t~ta,~ METHOD

In peace, the opportunities for men and women who speak another language cover the
widest range; with the armies of occupation, and in business. Prize positions will be open to
men and women in every field-administrators, interpreters, office. workers, secretaries,
engineers, foremen, mechanics, liaison, relief and health workers.

gr own home in spare time you can
prepare for war and peace oppor-
es. The world-famous Linguaphone
s you the VOICES of native teachers
guide you by easy stages to understand
SPEAK the language of your choice.
earn by EAR. You, simply LISTEN and
& the text with your EYES-you repeat

what you HEAR and in an amazingly short
time you are actually CONVERSING!
It's as easy and pleasurable as learning a
new sang!
Save Time, Work and Money. With a
Linguaphone set at your side you can study
anywhere any time at your ease, alone or
in a group.

"PUDDLES" and PUP-Wearing a GI cap and a
thoughtful look "Puddles" guards her offspring
"Tiny Tim" as he pops his head out of a field shoe
at Parris Island Marine Base. -AP Photo.

GUAPHONE-LANGUAGE MASTER TO THE WORLD
ulty of 250 of the foromost language professors of the leading universities collaborated to make the
phone Conversational Method the easiest and quickest way to master a new language. More than a
hnmA-studv students, men and women of all anes and in all walks of life have profited by Lingua-

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the 33 United Nations and

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