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February 21, 1943 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WC: k THE -MICHIGAN DAILY
ensa SadRussian Gains Raise Alli1ed Ho mes

T7ide Turned'
By Ales on
Tunisian Front
(Continued from Page 1)
British patrols sparred with the foe
30 miles south in the FOum Tatahou-
ihe area. Dust storms-hampered this
powerful Allied arm some 65 miles
inside southern Tunisia from Libya.
Marshal Rommel sent a strong pa-
trol against an Allied brigade in the
Sbiba region, 20 miles north of Sbeit-
la, and also attacked U.S. forces
guarding the Kasserine gap, an Allied
spokesman said, At Sbiba, the 'Ger-
mans were said to have lost six tanks
and 'six self-propelling guns. The
spokesman said enemy losses were
even heavier at the Kasserine pass.
Snow,'rain and gales swept most
of Tunisia,, grounding virtually all
planes.
U.S. combat troops were deployed
on both sides of Kasserine pass when
the Germans struck early Thursday.
The enemy made, some small gains
in the initial fighting, but by night
the Yanks were back at :their original
positions and the enemy had turned
tail toward the town of Kasserine-.
(The Germans claimed they had
captured nearly 3,000 prisoners dur-
ing the week, mostly Americans, and
destroyed or captured 125 heavy
tanks, 5.0 big guns and 40 armored
cars.)
Fresh supplies and materiel have
" h mountains near th leinbr
der of central Tunisia./ The indiffer-
ent communications in this region
slowed the reorganization and prob-
ably will delay the coming Allied
assault.
The lossO of tanks, guns and trucks
was viewed more seriously than the
abandonment of 4,000 square miles of
central. Tunisia to Rommel's numeri-
cally superior troops. The territorial
loss was regarded at headquarters as
"incidental."
to B Given
"Heart of 'a City," by Leslie Storm,
a drama of war-time London at the
height of the German aerial assault,
has been chosen by Play Production
for its niext presentation. The play will
be given March 3-6 in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
The play. involves a group of showe
girls who carry on at their small re-
vue theatre, The Windmill, during the
most violent days and nights of Nazi
fury. in 'an effort to catch the spirit
of Londoners during the air raids, the
author presents scenes luring the
blitz and the peoples' reactions. In the
opening scenes, in the "star" dress-
ing-room, the author tries to depict
this spirit of Londoners "under fire."

W here Red Army Continues Push
::u
-. fa , s a :-----------

BEJA
OU AR DA PONT DU FS
OBA
M KTA selTrA SO
T BSSA FI
KHENCHEL.A SBEITL A PASS
ALGERIA NA SD Bul
MAKNASSY
ASA SENED
REDEYEF
- -GA BES:'
NTA - --
--- ---TH l
ChottD el-
- - MEDENINE
MAETH *
FOUM TATAHOUINE
0 50
STATUTE MI.ES

i

American armored forces (black arrows) have stabilized a new line
on the Tunisian mountains near the Algerian frontier as Marshal Rom-
mel's violent drive (white arrows) dwindled to mere skirmishing after
carrying Axis forces more than 60 miles. London heard radio reports
that American tanks had broken the German thrust toward Algeria.
Meantime, the menacing loom of Britain's Eighth Army grew larger in
the rear of Rommel's army. Black shading shows how British units are
moving into Tunisia from Libya, having penetrated (1) to Medenine
and having occupied Foum Tatahouine. Broken line re resents original
positions from which U.S. troops were forced back.
SIMPSON'S ANALYSIS:
Kharov Ame f .Rd Dr~-e

Soviets Punch
Germans on
500-Mile _Line
(Continued from Pge 1)
The enemy is havng a difficult
tirme keeping a straight line in the
easy terrain, hurrying up reserves,
some .reported just arrived from
France, but the Russians say these
are being encircled in small groups by
swift ski troops cuttng behnd the
foe. The Germans apparently have
plenty of tanks aroundOrel and the
heavy snowstorms have not hampered
operations
West of Kharkov, the Germans are
trying to throttle a new thrust whiph
could be aimed straight at Poltava
or be turned southwestward to bear
down on Dnieperopetrovsk. This is
one of the most potent points mn the
Russian advance at the moment
At recaptured Merefa, 15 miles
southwest of Kharkov, the Russians
are in an ideal tactical position.
Krasnograd, a big Ukrainian city, is
only 37 miles southwest. The Russians
said they continued their advance
overnight wiping out a German regi-
ment and 16 tanks, 150 trucks and 13
self-propelled guns.
Between Kharkov and Dnieperopet-
rovsk, the Russians have been holding
Lozovaya since Feb. 11 and are within
'60 miles of the big dam site on the
Dnieper River. There have been no
dispatches from this sector since then
and it is presumed that the Germans
are making a supreme effort to hold
the area.
The weight of the Soviets in the
Donets Basin appears to be so heavy
that the Germans are reported just
holding on and trying to exticate
themselves.
Three strongly fortified towns west
of Rostov and another large place
west of Rovenki were captured during
the night, the Russian communique
said.
One of the most interesting sectors
to watch next week will be the Black
Sea cobst of the north Caucasus. The
Russians said they broke through a
new defense line and mine-fieds west
of Krasnodar and "are advancing"
after capturing a number of large
ppulatpd places
pThe Russians mopping up this are
are closing in daily upon te few
precious miles the Germans hold
around Novorossisk.
Bicycle Auction,
sS uccesful
High Prices Paid
By N duerous Bidders
The demand for bicycles far ex
ceeded the supply Saturday morning
when more than one hundred hopeful
bidders attended the bicycle auction
held by the Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment at the City Hall.
Bicycles with flat tires, bicycles
with no seats, bicycles with no fend-
ers, all brought high prices. It was
a great, day for the Police Depart-
ment, for after tabulating the results,
Ann Arbor was $214 richer through
the sale of only 13 bicycles.
While the top price in the last auc-
tion ,was only $12.50, Saturday's auc-
tion brought a top price of $28.00.
Bicycles of all descriptions were sold
with the bidding rapid and spirited
No bicycle went for less than $10, and
when some of the better bicycles were
in danger of going for fifteen dollars
or less, a mere wod from the auc-
tioneer and the bidding would shoot
the price to twenty dollars.

With the capture of Oboyan and reported successes in other sectors,
the Red Army has continued pushing westward,' narrowing Nazi-occu-
pied territory, represented here by shaded area. The Russia~ have
cleared the last German soldier from the Kursk-Kharkov railroad and
highway. Soviet forces were 25 miles west of Kharkov and were driving
toward Taganrog in the Donets Basin..
Kapln T Prsent Frs o
SRA Lecture Series 'Tuesday

Americans Stabilize T unisian Line

a .1 TO SPRING"
Newest thing ... stunning hand
screened silk jersey dresses.
Have 'em in Junior and Regu-
lar sizes . .. gayly designed . ..
beautifully fitted styles. The
Jean Carol Originals a6. the
Mademoiselle Shop feature na-
vy dresses with crisp white lin-
siscome nthe sftestwol
"NDIAN LOVE SONG"
Tobrighten your des
Michigan. and U.S.A. wooden
bookends! Also at Mr. Foster's
Remewbrance Shop... loads
xof Indian silver bangle brace-
lets, and graceful sterling silver
yo nhaven't seen ,heir, supe
collection of sport and dressy
earrings, you're really missing
┬žumpin'!"

Hi everybody--Dd you feel the
whiff of spring in the air? The
stores are goin' to town with
classic new outfits. Drop in and

U

By KIRKE L. SIMPSON,
SAssociated Press Correspondent
Bad news from Tunisia underscored
the past week for Americans but a
war balancee struck on events there
and in Russia for those seven days
yields a heavy credit showing in Allied
favor:
American defeat in the first clash
with Ropmmel's veterans in central
Tunisia takes on a less ominous cast
on more complete 'information. It
ibecomes virtually certain, for ex-
ample, that the Nazi attack was
purely a limited local 'Operation. It
widened the Tunisian, com'munication
corridor for the foe and so crippled
Franco- American forces, throwrn
back 60 miles or more that a consider-
able time must elapse, before the

i

flanking threat can be renewed.
it also is now clear by delayed eye-
witness reports of the four-day battle
that it was in no sense an American
frout but an ordered and orderly re-
treat. That is highly important. It
means that in its first major battle
,test an untried American army proved
its mettle. Outmatched ini weight 'of j
armour as well as, numbers, it fell
back sullenly and unwillingly under
orders intended to conserve its per-
sonnel and equipment to fight againr
under more favorable circumstances.
Russian recapture of Kharkov was
the dominant event of the week on
the Eastern Front. Even more start-
ling Soviet successes seem in the mak-
ing all the way from Orel in the north
to Tagonrog 'in the south as well as
deep in enemy lines west of Kharkov.
Nevertheless, the Russian Kharkov
vicoryappars to the best informed
Amkerican and British official observ-
ers as the highlight of the current
Iussian campaign for definite rea-
sons.
President Roosevelt and Secretary
Stimson concurred that loss of that
powerful bastion and othes like Ros-
tov }stripped Hitler of the springpoards
essential to a summer renewal of his
attack on Russia.

Dr. Mordecai Kaplan of Teacher's
College, Columbia University will
present the Jewish point of view on
"The Existence and Nature of God"
in a lecture to be held at 8:15'pm.
Tuesday in Rackham Amphitheatre
The lecture, which is under, the
sponsorship of the Student Religious:
Associations, is the first in a series of
four on the same subject-.
Dr. Kaplan, the first speaker of the
series, is editor of the' Jewish Recon-
structionist papers and Professor at
Columbia University. From 1937 to
2939 he was viing professor of
Hebrew at the University of Jeru-
salem-.
A leader of the Society for the Ad-
vancement of Judaism since 1922,.he
is the author of several books: A New
Approach to the Problem of Judaism,,

published in 1924; Judaism as a Ci-vl-
zation in 1934; The. Meaning of Clod
In Modern Jewish Religion in 1937.
This same subject was dealt with in
four lectures presented in' 1938-39
when Dr. Bertrand Russell, Msgr. Ful-
ton Sheen and Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr
made up the series.
.At present arrangements have been
made to bring Pather,Paul H. Furfey
and Dr. Richard Niebuhr to present
the Protestant and Catholic positions
on The Existence and Nature of Clod.
Unsettled academic conditions and
difficulties of transportation have
caused some difficulty in obtaining a
speaker to present the Agnostic point
of view; negotiations are still tinder
way and when'te Agnostic speaeris
arranged for, his name will be an-
nounced

.-
i r1nH.

Nip Jre.4.4ener

1

r

LOAFER--Saddle finish;
-tan calf,/1%$/" ,eel.
9.95 .

r

LAZY LACER--In tan calf,
or navy suede with navy
,calf, 1%"I heel
9.95

POST BOY-Tan Dorset
oxford, unlined, 2" heel.

1 Q.95

1
V

SPEED LIMIT RAISED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20. - (/P) -
Motor carriers making emergency de-
liveries for the Army, Navy, Mari-
time Commission and War Shipping
Administration will be permitted to
exceed the 35-mile-an-holy speed
limit for a 60-day trial period begin-
ning March 1.

-H UTZEL'S
Main at Liberty

P .
r

7fr ~ q Z k
} f } i
f
"
}
6 Y"
Kf
itz

Z44 14.t4q,; -o74r

4

fBEGIN TH E BEGUlNE"
Collins has a 'wonderful stock
10% w ool . ..acrdigan's, pull
overs, and plenty of Sloppy
Jogs! We loved the new shades
... heavenly haze, sea green,
cherry,' violet, dusty rose. Add
a 100% pastel wool skirt, and
your outfit's complete! Plaids,
plains, and plenty with pleats.
K-
"LOVELY TO LOOK AT'"
Girls here's your golden
opportunity! Calkins-Fletcher
has a super sale'on.. . 'spe-
cially for you. Tussy cleansing
cream, in jet black jars. . .
regular $1.75 Size for $1.00--$3
size for only $1.95." We also saw
Emulsified Cleansing cream for
era 'dry skins. lRun now . .,

I

is good

Spring hosiery news

$1 .95 'U

"WAKE UP 'N SING"
Scoop of the month ...the
classic long-sleeved white cot-
ton shirt. Only $3,,at Dillon's.
We saw loads of colored shirt-
waists . .. swell for-school? And
to touch up your n-^rspring
suit with that perky look...
try a frilly sheer blouse.. Really'
lovely . .. in all colors.

w
",,,,x ,

to
l
M
,!
l

mews

Make Xt More rule
To Walk More
Yet, for all their comfort, their smart styling is good
to look upon and their rugged quality is a better-than
good thought these days when quality means so much.
Try these and other styles in our Adirondack Shoe Room!

New shades this siring are
Ulf more f lattering than ever
before. Some of the new
shades are chore, hearth, and
cheer.

Early posies to help you to
boys will always remember

be the girl the
printed on jer-

sey and rayon crepe.

"REMEMBER, ME"

The final touch to your outfit
. jewelry. We were positively

I

I

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