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May 07, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

'THE MICHIGAN DAILYV

IDAI; M~x , 03

I ________________________________________________________________________________ I
F

CORDJL -AND SMILIN(:
Music Will Exist After the
War,' Fritz Kreisler Predicts

By MARY RONAY
While waiting for the key to hi.
room yesterday in the Union lobby
Fritz Kreisler-- cordial, his way
white hair and srmiling eyes adding
to his distinguished appearance-de'
scribed his faith in the music whicl
would be in prominence after th
war, saying he had no doubt that i
would be in existence whatever ti
source.
"It is not important what schoo
of composition will be favored,
Kreisler. said. "Whatever is good
whether classic, romantic or modern
will be liked by'all people. This doe
not mean that it will be new music
however, for we can't always have
Beethoven or Brahms."
Kreisler declared that the wa
could not be won with music, bi
the war might uncover some grey
musician that we know nothin
about. He explained that the pres
ent crisis had already introduced ani
Two Scholarships
To Mexico Off,?red
By Spanish Club
Two scholarships for the summe
session at the National Universityc
Mexico at Mexico City are offered I
the Spanish Club.
Students interested in Spanish wh
wish to apply for one of these scho
arships are urged to see Prof. E.P
Mercado, faculty adviser of th
Spanish Club, in Room 302 of t
Romance Language Building befo
next Wednesday.
Under this plan the Spanish Cl
gives the students $50 andithe Na
tional University of Mexico give
them their tuition for the eig]
weeks term. The University of Mic
igan will likewise dispense with ti
tuition charges for two Mexican stu
dents if the National Universi
wishes to send them.
Sailing Officers Elected
The Michigan Sailing Club, in a
election held yesterday eveningi
the Union selected its new officer
Caleb Warner, '44E, commodor
Bob Bennet, '46E, vice-commodor
George Haskell, '46E, secretary; Te
Greer, '46E, treasurer; Bill Maccou
'44E, fleet captain; Bob Ford, '45
quartermaster.

made popular a great number of
Russian compositions.
"We can't tell where this new com-
poser may be," Kreisler quietly re-
marked. "It may- be in Egypt or
Morocco; perhaps from some Bud-
dhist monk in Tibet or some musi-
cian of China. At one time we did
not understand the writings of Con-
fucius, but after much study, we
were able to enrich our own philoso-

FRITZ KREISLER
o -.-- - - - - - -
A- phies with his teachings. Chinese
A. music now sounds jumbled-it is also
he possible that we shall understand
he this form of music and apply parts
re of it to our own compositions."
Kreisler also said that this new
ib composer might be at war now, and
a from the experiences which he is now
es going through would be able to cre-
ht ate a music that would place him
among the great.
Ever kindly, his face showing the
uy maturity derived from his long life
ty with music, Kreisler also spoke of
the opportunities for young musi-
cians, their chance of becoming fam-
ous on the concert stags.
in "Because of the radio and the pol-
in icy of employing younger artists, as
s: shown by the new talent which has
e; been introduced into the Metropoli-
e; tan Opera Company," Kreisler de-
ed clared, "It is much easier for the.
n, young musician to be recognized. He
E, doesn't have to worry as much about
sponsorship and financial backing."

Hillel To Hold
Installation of
New Officers
Wallace To Succeed
Seiden as President;
Wittan Is Secretary
A special ceremony for the installa-
tion of the newly-elected officers of
the Hillel Student Council will be
held at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at the
Foundation.
Stan Wallace, '45, will succeed Dan
Seiden, '43, to the presidency while
Beverly Wittan, '46, will replace
Netta Siegel, '45, as secretary. Other
outgoing officers are Albert Cohen,
'43BAd, first vice - president, and
Charlotte Kaufman, '43, second vice-
president.
In conjunction with the installa-
tion 16 honor keys will be presented
to those students who have contrib-
uted the most to Hillel. Eligible for
this award are seniors, juniors, and
men leaving for the armed forces.
The nine most active members of
Hillel throughout their college years
will be honored by the placing of
their names on a special plaque.
Preceding the installation the final
council meeting of the year will be
held at 10 a.m. Plans for the sum-
mer semester will be discussed and
formulated.
Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen, director
of the Foundation, announced yester-
day that applications are now being
accepted for the annual Hostess
Scholarship consisting of $75 each
The two girls chosen for this award
will serve as hostesses on alternate
afternoons throughout the coming
year. Forms may be obtained from
Miss Esther Lerner, secretary of the
Foundation.
United Jewish Appeal
Goes Over Goal by $300
Over $1,300 has been collected in
the local drive for the United Jewish
Appeal, topping the goal by $300.
Herb Levin, '45M, Chairman said,
"We are amazed and greatly pleased
by the huge response which the stu-
dent body has shown this cause."
The campaign will continue until
Monday.
Engineers Will
Hold Banquet
The Annual Engineering Bfanquet
will be held on Thursday, May 13 at
the Union with James C. Zeder,
Grad., head of Chrysler Motors En-
gineering Department as guest spea-
ker.
Tickets will be on sale next Mon-
day, and may be purchased on the
second floor of the West Engineering
building or from any member of the
engineering council at $1.35 a ticket.
The committee for the banquet is
made up of Karl Reed, '44E, pro-
gram; Carl Jacobson, '44E, and Wen-
dell Racette, '44E, publicity; John
Riopelle, '44E, tickets; Howard-How-
e&ith, '43E, general chairman.
Program Planners
Convene in Detroit
The Program Planners Institute,
sponsored partly by the University,
will hold its annual meeting for club
program chairmen today in the
Rackham Memorial Building in De-
troit.
Mrs. Donald S. MGuire of the

Institute is general chairman of the
program. Wayne University and
University of Detroit instructors will
speak at some of the ten. sessions.
These group meetings, held simul-
taneously in the afternoon, are de-
signed not only to suggest program
materials but to discuss various
methods of presenting the material.
A. special feature of the Institute
will be the Detroit Public Library
exhibit, "Living Today for Tomor-
row."

Zahn Stresses
Great Ianger -
Of Home Fires
Precautions Against j
Blazes Are Shown by I
Ann Arbor Fire Chief
Fire Chief Benjamin Zahn urged
yesterday that immediate precau-
tions be taken against home fires
since they are as dangerous to the
war effort as are fires in war plants
themselves.
He pointed out that the three im-
portant things to do in preventingt
home fires are-good housekeeping,
regular inspection and repair and
speed in reporting and fighting a
fire.
"Every dwelling fire destroys ma-
terials that are becoming more diffi-
cult to replace," he said. "Like a
saboteur, it subtracts just that much
from the help we can give the boys
at the front."
The essentials in safety were cited
by the chief as disposal of all com-
bustible material and of all oil or
paint-soaked rags. Oil mops must
be kept in tight metal containers and
gasoline should never be kept in the
house.
Arrangements should be made by
the resident to clean and repair heat-
ing plants and stoves, chimneys and
flues, electrical appliances and wir-
ing.
He urged that every member of
the family be taught how to turn in
an alarm and know where all articles

Charged in Stephall Case

'PREVIEW OPENING':

-1_ . - . . r ,r

The new School of Public Health
building will have a "preview open-
ing" when the Institute on Public
Health Economics convenes there
Monday morning for a two-week ses-
sion.
The Institute, f:rst one on public
health economics to be held in this
country, will be attended by repre-
sentatives of hospitals, health ser-
vices, medical schools and bureaus,
state health departments, and social
welfare departments from all over
the United States. Various federal
agencies are sending delegates. The
School of Public Health, sponsoring

the Institute, is planning to accom-
modate 55 or 60 people.
Daily lectures, seminars, panel dis--
cussions, and special courses will be
offered on the program. On May 20,
speakers with varied viewpoints will
present interpretations of the future
in a panel discussion, "Looking into
the Future."
The Institute is under the direction
of Nathan Sinai, Ph.D., professor of
public health. "The Institute is
something in the nature of a conven-
tion and a seminar," Dr. Sinai said.
The new School of Public Health
building will have its formal opening
in June.

THEODORE DONAY
... (above) is on trial in Detroit
on a charge of misprision of trea-
son. The government alleges Do-
nay knew of Max Stephan's actions
in sheltering an escaped German
prisoner but did not report them.
At his trial yesterday Donay repre-
sented himself as a Pole whose
persecution at the hands of the
Nazis had been severe. He claimed
that his mother and sister who are
still in Germany would suffer be-
cause of the trial.

F

,

,or
17

In I

ctj en t Yj,

Pleajare!

State Board
To Hear Hotel
Owners' Pleas
Members of the State Housing and

CONCERTOS

great Mujic, Supertly

/trl Ped

New University Building Is-
Site for Public Health Meeting

of fire - fighting
available.
Sharp Will G
Oil Camping'
Dr. L. B. Sharp,
trated lecture on th
ing and the Public
a.m. tomorrow in
Room of the Rack
Dr. Sharp is direc
Inc., and of The T
New York City.
illustrated with a
camping educatior
March of Time.
The lecture is s
University class in
eration with Mic
Girls' Camp Week,

are immediately City Building Board of Appeals will
meet Monday night to consider the
_ _- appeals of Ann Arbor hotel owners
who complain that they cannot make
ive Lecture the necessary alterations because
materials are unavailable.
Tomorrow The hotels involved, the Allenel,
will give an illus- Belmore, Griswold, Lincoln, Milner,
e subject "Camp- Rainey, and St. James, appealed to
Schools" at 8:30 the boards after the city building
the East Lecture department's written notice that they
ham Building. must comply with the local and state
tor of Life Camps, codes by May 1, thus taking the case
National Camp in out of the jurisdiction of the depart-
His talk will t be ment.

and IPecordd
IANO

Beethoven: CONCERTO NO. 4
Schnabe with St ock and Chicago Symphony
Victor DM 930 $4.72

11

Lsound film on,
n prepared by
sponsored by the
camping in coop-
higan Boys' and
May 9 to May 16.

WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
Continuous from 1 P.M.

MICHIGAN

TODAY
and Saturday

r r1* r~la

IN THE DRAMA-
CROWDED STORY
THAT SHOWS THEMa
See and thrill to the one picture
with a famed name in every role!
Ay

Presenting
BRIAN ROBERT t
AHERNE CUMMINGS L
IDA HERBERT
LUPINO MARSHALL - M
4 ANNA MERLE
NEAGLE - OBERON
AND 70 MORE
HOLLYWOOD FAVORITES
Directors and Producers
RENE CLAIR " EDMUND GOULDING
CEDRIC HARDWICKE * FRANK LLOYD
VICTOR SAVILLE.ROBERT STEVENSON
HERBERT WILCOX
a 1i~tribated by RKO RADIO Pitures

CHARLES
AUGHTON,
ItRAY
ILILAND

CLASSIFIED
DIR2ECTORIY
CLASSIFIED
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of $.25 for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Brown zipper notebook. Con-
tents important. Reward. C. Ta-
ber, Martha Cook, 2-3225.
LOST-Sigma Alpha Iota pin on
Wednesday between Union and
Hill Auditorium. Return to Union.
Reward.
RED WALLET. Initials O.S.S. Find-
er keep money. No questions
asked. Deborah Springer, 915
Oakland. 2-2868. Keepsake.
HELP WANTED
GIRL for general office work-no
experience needed. Good starting
salary and excellent opportunity
for advancement. Dixie Shops, 125
West Michigan Avenue, Ypsilanti,
Ypsilanti 2650.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State.1
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought.
rented, repaired. Student and Of-
fice Supplies. O. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.
WANTED
WANTED-Three desirable May Fes-
tival tickets for Saturday after-
noon concert-Notify Helen Briggs,
559 Jordan.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE : Log Log Duplex Deci-!
trig slide rule. Perfect condition.
$11 cash. Call Richard Bruns-

Friday and Saturday

MAARSI-ALLS
Qfet4

CARTOON
AND NEWS

MATINEES 25c
NIGH'T'S 40c

11

SUNDAY
"EDGE OF DARKNESS"

1 _
LOOKS LIKE
H, BIJG -HEFR IR!
SPRNGFOMAL
Semi-Formal if desired
TOMORROW NIGHT

FREE

FREE
CLOCKS

s

ALARM

TOMORROW, May 8th, Marshall's Drug Stare will give away threc Ingram
Renown alarm clocks. The customers who receive-cash register receipts num-
bered 500, 750 and 1000 this Saturday at Marshall's will each receive one
of these fine alarm clocks with the compliments of Marshall's Drug Store.
These are very fine otarm clocks and a. great prize to win these days of
no clocks for sale."
Three Free Alarm Clocks at Marshall's Drug Store
Just sqy that you saw this ad in
The Michigan Daily
Saturdav at

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