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May 05, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAETiWO

THE MICHIGAN, DATIL

WCE~-,fAr MiAY - , 94

.....,,
-- -

State Receives
Highway Loan
U.S. Grants Funds for
Willow Run Roadway
LANSING, May 4.- A"P)- The
State Highway Department has re-
ceived federal funds totaling $7,057,-
000 for further construction work on
the Detroit Industrial Expressway
between the Willow Run area and
metropolitan Detroit, Highway Com-
missioner Charles M. Ziegler an-
nounced today.
Ziegler said $6,000,000 of the grant
would be applied to section three of
the expressway, extending between
Southfield Road and Wyoming Ave-
nue at the west city limits of Detroit.
Total cost of the section, he said, is
estimated at $12,568,000, to be fi-
nanced on a 75-25 basis by federal
and state governments.
The remaining $1,057,000 of the
grant will be applied to section two
of the expressway, the stretch nearly
completed last winter which extends
between the Willow Run access road
system and Southfield Road.
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE

Al Picture Wins Puditzer Prize

LAST OF SEASON:~
Play Produci
'The Wishfl ┬ži
Campus talent will come into theI
limelight with the presentation of
"The Wishful Taw," by Elizabeth
Wilson, Grad., by the Play Produc-
tion of the speech department, May
12-15 in the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
The play is a type of music-drama
which is centered around the cus-
toms and life of the people in the
Ozark Mountain region. Miss Wil-
son has gotten her material from
first-hand experience. The writer's
home is in Springfield, Mo., and she
has spent her summers in a cabin
some 17 miles from the resort district
in the Ozarks, during which time she
gathered material which she uses in
"The Wishful Taw," and which is
also the basis for nine one-act plays
which she is now writing.
Miss Wilson uses a well-knownI
story of the region and sets it in the
rich native background. As she said,
"The play is woven around an old

on To Present
Uar' May 12-15
campfire story, the type of tale that
you would spin around an open fire
at night in that friendly country."
The name of the music play is de-
rived from an old Ozark tradition.
One of the most popular forms of
recreation is the "play party," a com-
munity party with dancing for all.
The best -known "fiddlers" are
brought from far and near to provide
the music for the occasion and the
music is supplemented by guitars,
melodians and other noise makers.
The one who "calls" the dances adds
to the general confusion. The "taw"
is a girl at the dance and a "wishful"
one is a "taw" who would like to be-
come a particular person's partner.
"The Wishful Taw" was written
in Prof. K. T. Rowe's class in play-
writing.
Tickets for the play will go on sale
at the Lydia Mendelssohn box office
May 10, and mail orders may be re-
ceived now.

Council Petitiols
Due Tomorrow
Petitions for Engineering Council
are due tomorrow in Dean Alfred H.
Lovell's office. 259 W. Engineering
Building. John Gardner, '46E, an-
nounced.
Petitions should contain a pro-
posed plan of class activities for the
coming year, and the qualifications
of the candidate. They must be
signed b at least 15 members of the
petitioner's class, Freshman' peti-
tioners must have 32 credit hours
by the end of the current semester,
'ophomores 64 and juniors 94.
Six positions on the Enineering
Council are open-two for freshmen,
two for sophomores and two for
J uniors.

MICHIGAN
MATS. 25c EVES. 40c
Ending Wednesday!

This picture entitled "Water!" taken by Associa ted Press uhotographer Frank Noel in January, 1942,
as he drifted in a lifeboat toward the northwest shor a of Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies, after surviving

a ship torpedoing in the Indian Ocean, was announced in New York as
"an outstanding exanple of news photography."

the winner of the Pulitzer prizes

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

7rgla'

25c to
5 P.M.

STATE
anR4 AKBOAS'NEWEST THEATP.E.
Last Times Today.
ALL YOU'VE EVER DREAMEU
OF IN ONE GREAT SHOW
~-ANR MORE!

Grossman To Head Student
Speakers' Bureau Next Year

I
'
i
)

CHARLES R. ROGERS presents
"THE POWERS
and
The Power's
long-stemmeC
American Beauties
GEORGE ANNE
MURPHY * SHIRLEY
CAROLE INTRO ING THE SINGING STAR
LANDIS * DENNIS DAY,
With AlAN MOWBRAY c
Produced by
CHARLES R. ROGERS '
Directed by
NORMAN Z. MLEOO
Released thru
United Artists -
Atg iDtS O HR A .
Coming Thursday
LUPE VELEZ
EDDIE ALBERT - MAX BAER

Mary Lee Grossman, '46, of Sag-
inaw, will take over the duties of
Nancy Filstrup, '43, as chairman of
the Student Speakers' Bureau for
the coming school year, Prof. Ken-
neth G. Hance, faculty adviser, an-
nounced yesterday.
Miss Grossman, who is a member
of Collegiate Sorosis, will be respons-
ible for the general organization and!
supervision of the Bureau's student
speakers.
Three other women were appoint-1
ed to assist in the running of the
Bureau. Dorothy Servis, '45, of Otse-
go, will be in charge of securing and
placing student volunteer speakers.
Jean Loree, '45, of Lansing will fur-
nish students for off-campus speak-
ing, and Joyce Siegan, '46, will take
care of campus contacts.
The Speakers Bureau was estab-
lished last fall to supply students
who would lead discussions and pre-
sent special speeches to any group.
During the past year volunteers have
spoken at dormitories, sororities and
cooperatives to raise interest in the
Post-War Council conferences. The
Bureau has also provided speakers
for the Office of Civiian Defense,
and for an adult class at the First
Methodist Church.
Anyone may become a member of
the Bureau by choosing his own topic
Ilasel Elected President of
Lutheran Student Group

for a speech and delivering it before
a faculty board for approval.
Among the groups cooperating
with the Bureau are the Union, the
Office of Civilian Defense, the Post-E
War Council, Athena and Zeta Phi
Eta, honorary speech society.
Plans for next year's activities in-
elude the furnishing of speakers for
high school assemblies and special
forums, the presentation of programs
and discussions for church groups.
Student volunteer speakers may also
be used in adult education classes,
Dr. Blakeman
Attends Chicago
REA Meeting
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, religious
counselor for the University, will re-
turn today from the first regional
conference of the Religious Educa-
tion Association held Sunday and
Monday at the Divinity School of
the University of Chicago.
The conference theme-"Religion
in Higher Education Today"--dealt
with the theories of religion as set
forth in colleges of the church and
state universities and practical edu-
cational tasks now confronting the
administrators.

House Passes
Contested Pay-
As-You-Go Bill
(Continued from Page 1)
current year and pay' such estimated
tax within the year.
3. Farmers-a special rule applies.
If the gross income of an individual
from farming for the taxable year is
at least 80 per cent of his total esti-
mated gross income from all sources,
such an individual may file a declar-
ation of the estimated tax at any
time on or before Dec. 15 or the tax-
able year if the taxpayer is on a
calendar year basis.
4. The final return will be filed by
all taxpayers as at present on or be-
fore the March 15 following the close
of the taxable year. On this return,
adjustments will be made for differ-
ences between the estimated or with-
held tax, and the correct tax reported
by the taxpayer.
Since most4taxpayers already Dave
filed their 1942 returns on March 15,
their payments on March 15 and
June 15, 1943 will be treated as pay-
ments on their 1943 liability, instead
of on 1942 income. Taxpayers on a
calendar year basis who are required
to file declarations of their estimated
tax will file their first declaration
for 1943 on Sept. 15, and their pay-
ments made in March and June will
be treated as payments on their esti-
mated 1943 tax.
English Thesis
rT'F 'l T'~ 111,

CLASSIFIED
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of $.25 for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
TYPING
MISS ALLEN - Experienced typist.
408 South Fifth Avenue. 2-2935.
HELP WANTED
GIRL for general office work-no
experience needed. Good starting
salary and excellent opportunity
for advancement. Dixie Shops, 125
West Michigan Avenue, Ypsilanti,
Ypsilanti 2650.

MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State.
MAKE MONEY-on your used cloth-
ing by phoning Claude H. Brown.
2-2736, 512 S. Main.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel. Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought,
rented, repaired. Student and Of-
fice Supplies. 0. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.
WANTED
WANTED: Adjustable sidewalk roll-
er skates in good condition. Phone
2-3038.
WANTED-Boys for dish washing.
Please call Mrs. Rawles, Sorosis-
2-3279.
WANTED-Three desirable May Fes-
tival tickets for Saturday after-
noon concert-Notify Helen Briggs,
559 Jordan.

WESLEY RUGGLES m
Prodvc.d byA
SALc PANDRO S. BEIMAN

LOST and FOUND

LAUNDERING

darne.

LAUNDRY-2-1044. Soxe
Careful work at low price.

LOST-Wallet with necessary identi-
fication. Only interested in cre-
dentials. Liberal reward. Call
Harry Lawrence, 3195.

THURSDAY
"FOREVER AND A

DAY"

"LADIES DAY"

Lowell Hasel, '44E, was elected A special meeting of the Higher
president of the Lutheran Student Education Committee, of which Dr.
Association for 1943-44 school elec- Blakeman is chairman, was held to
tion recently. discuss the responsibility of universi-
Vice-President and program chair- ties and colleges for religion in Amer-
man is Virginia Rock, '44. Other ican culture.
officers who will be installed at the Representatives from colleges and
annual Senior Banquet Sunday, May universities of Illinois, Iowa, Indiana,
16 are Onnolee Anderson, '45 and Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and
Susan Thorsch, '46. Ohio attended the performance.

BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

To tHe ruotsnea'
"Thomas De Quincey's Theory of
Literature," Sigmund K. Proctor's
doctor's dissertation, was considered
J by members of the Department of
I English interviewed recently, to be
"such a good, scholarly thesis that
we thought it ought to be published."
Proctor's thesis, presented in 1937,
- is the latest volume in the series of
Michigan Studies and was published
last month by members of the Eng-
lish department as a valuable contri-
bution to scholarship in the field of
English :omanticism.
The author, a graduate of the Uni-
versity, was an instructor of English
here for 12 years and also taught at
the University of Illinois the year
before his death in 1937. He was
co-editor of a volume for freshman
English, "Prose Patterns," published
in 1933.
The book was prepared for publi-
cation by Professors C. D. Thorpe
and Paul Mueschke of the Depart-
ment of English, and carries a brief
foreword by Prof. Louis I. Bredvold,
chairman of the department.
Congress Petitions
Are Due Friday
"All petitions for senio appoint-
ments to Congress must be handed
in to room 306 in the Union not
later than , p.m "riday," Edgar J.
Vaughan, R :di: Secretary of the
Congress, moune d yesterday.
Unaffiliai d n students who will
be juniors .. te beginning of the
summer se, eligible to peti-
tion. Outig enior officers and
faculty advisors x 1 make the new
appointmeni..
FORDHAM iNIVERSITY'
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW : oRK
Case S.stem
Three-Year Day Course

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F:<
CF}:
is
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Are
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Mother'll Understc

if you don't call her on
Long Distance this Sunday
MOTHERS are understanding and patriotic. They know that,
under the steadily increasing burden of war-created calls,
long distance telephone equipment is seriously overloaded.

Of course they like to be remembered on Mother's Day,

I

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