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April 20, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-04-20

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TUE$DYAPRIL. 20, 1943

a L i A

WOMEN'S NEWS

THEa MJ1HGAN DAILY

" SPORTS NEWS

SPORTS NEWS

Wolverine

Nine

Tangles

with

Notre

Dame

Here

Today

Deborah Parry Is Announced as Chairman Tilt Moved up One Day;
Of New Junior Project Central Committee Boim Starting Pitcher

M,-CLLTB
There will be a meeting of the
M-Club at eight o'clock Thursday
in the Union. All those men who
have recently won their varsity
letters are especially invited to
attend.
Julius Franks,
President

WRESTLING TEAM NOTICE
All men who have stopped comn-
ing to wrestling practice are re-
turned to PEM as of this date.,
Coach Ray Courtright
EXhIBITION BASEBALL

- I

Mary Mason, Assistant Head,
Will Aid Bond, Stamp Drive Two Central

The central committee of next
year's Junior Project *ill be headed
by Deborah Parry, Anne MacMillan,
'44, president of Judiciary Council,
announced yesterday.
Miss Parry is a member of Gamma
Phi Beta sorority, and will head the
war bond and stamp drive with the
aid of the new committee for the
remainder of this year and next.
IeOther positions on the committee
were announced as follows: Mary
Lee Mason, who is affiliated with
Alpha Phi sorority, assistant gen-
eral chairman; Cornelia Groefsema,
Betsy Barbour, treasurer; Mary
Driver, of Alpha Xi Delta, secretary,
and Marcia Netting, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, corsages.
Eugenia Schwartzbek, a member
of Alpha Xi Delta, will be in charge
of sororities; Peggy Weiss, Alpha
Gamma Delta, publicity, and Marcia
Sharpe, Kappa Kappa Gamma, is
assistant publicity chairman and will
handle all posters.
The Merit Committee will hold
a mass meeting at 4:30 p.m. to-
day in the-League for all women
interested in working with this
group during the coming semes-
ter.

Committees
Are Selected
The new central committee fo
the Surgical Dressing Unit and th
executive committee of the orienta
tion advisers were announced yester
day by their respective heads, Jear
Whittemore, '44, and Barbara Smith
'44.
Members of the central committe
of the Surgical Iressing Unit in
clude: Bette Carpenter, '45, attend
a~n!e chairman; Jean Loree, '45
packer; Nancy Pottinger, '46, receiv-
er; Dorothy Pugsley, '45, equipmen
chairtnan, and Mary Jane Thielan
'45, publicity. This group will hol
its Iirst meeting at 4:30 p.m. toda
in the League.
The executive committee for thE
orientation advisers is composed ol
Joan Clarke, '44, head of transfers
Mary Lee Mason, '45, social chair-
man, Helen Mae Kressbach, '44, heac
of the information booth, and Phyl-
lis Buck, 44A, in charge of th-
pamphlet.
A meeting of all freshman and
transfer advisers will be held at 4:45
p.m. Thursday in the League.

r
e
-
-t
n
f
e

Scholarships
Are Awarded.
Millie Otto, '44, Ann MacMillan,
'44, and Barbara Smith, '44, have
been awarded the Ethel McCormick
Scholarships of $100 each, given an-
nually to senior women by Judiciary
and League Council, and based upon
ands L scholaunhip, service to the
University and need.
Miss Otto is vice-president of As-
sembly, and a member of Wyvern,
Mortar Board, and Senior Society.
She was also chairman of Assembly
Banquet, Orientation adviser, and
served on the central committee of
Victory Ball.
Miss MacMillan, an Alpha Phi, is
a member of Wyvern and Mortar
Board, was chairman of Sophomore
Project and Canteen Corps, and was
an adviser in Jordan Hall.

By BUD LOW
Originally scheduled for tomor-!
row, the Michigan-Notre Dame base-
ball game has been moved up to this
af ternoon.
Weather permitting, the contest
will start at four o'clock on the Ferry
Field diamond. It was announced
yesterday that the Irish tilt had been
moved up in order to allow Notre
Dame to play Michigan State tomor-
row. The Spartans had to postpone
their game with the Irish because of
a military review today in East Lan-
sing.
Coach Ray Fisher expects to start;
Pro Boim again for the varsity.
Mickey Fishman will also see some!
action-since Fisher wants his veteran
hurlers to play as much as possible
before the Conference race begins,
It was also announced yesterday
that the game with Michigan Normal,
that was postponed last Friday would
be played here Thursday afternoon.
The playing of the team as a whole
in the Michigan State contest last

Saturday was very gratifying. Rook-
ics and veterans alike performed very
well. Sophomore Bruce Blanchard
was the standout performer of the
day, both defensively and offensively.
The talkative third baseman collec-
ted a single and a triple in four trips
to the plate, in addition to handling
flawlesslyaanything and everything
that came his way.
The three hit pitching of Boim,
Fishman, and Don Smith pleased
Fisher very much since he had been
worried that his mound staff had not
come along as fast as they should.
Each twirler allowed one hit apiece,
and Boim retired 12 straight batters
after allowing one unearned run in
the first inning.
Bob Stenberg, who holds down the
keystone sack, continued his sensa-
tional hitting of the week before by
getting two singles off the Spartan
hurlers. In three games, the lead-
off batter has knocked out seven
safeties in 14 official times at bat
for a .500 average.

Boston
Boston

(N) 00 001 000 5,-6 6 1
(A) 100 000 000 0-1 4 4

It's Spring

Aga

in at Michigan

I

SING at the .

ALL.CAMPUS SERANADE

Thursday,

AprilI

29

830 P.M.

On the Library

Steps

Athletics, Senators To pen ajor
League Baseball Season Today

a

, I , 17 1 !

Co*
- *

BUNNY HOP

SATURDAY, 9:00 to 12:00

at the UNION

Easter Favors for the Women

MICH IGAN

NOW SHOWING

N PEACE OR IN WAR, THERE HAS
NEVER BEEN A PICTURE SO STIRRING!

NEW YORK, April 19.--O)-Base-
ball will rap for attention tomorrow
with the first game of the 1943 Major
League season and give fans a chance
to observe for themselves what the
national pastime is going to look like
in its second year of the present war.
The crack of bats against horse-
hide in the Nation's Capital as the
I Washington Senators and Philadel-
phia Athletics square away probably
will get a bigger response from a lot
of people than all the gavel pound-
ing on Capitol Hill-for this one day
-because a crowd of 27,000 is ex-
pected at Griffith Stadium.
This will be a prelude to the pro-
gram on Wednesday when the other
clubs in the two big leagues will get
underway. The schedule of the regu-
lar openers:
National League-St. Louis at Cin-
cinnati, New York at Brooklyn, Phil-
adelphia at Boston and Pittsburgh at
Chicago.
American League - Washington
at New York, Boston at Philadelphia,
Detroit at Cleveland and Chicago at
St. Louis.
In the time-honored custom, pub-
H1armon Calls
Pareents from
1)utch Guiana
Continued from Page 1)
all right. "Good. I'm awfully glad
to hear you," he added.
Mrs. Bertram Jensen (Tom's sis-
ter, Sally) told Tom that "78 men
will pray all night on Holy Thursday
at St. Thomas Church for your crew.
Mary (Tom's other sister) told me to
tell you that you gave us a tough
assignment." She asked Tom if he
wanted them to call Elyse (Elyse
Knox, beautiful movie actress with
whom Harmon's name has been
linked numerous times.)
"Tell Elyse I'm safe and well," he
replied.
Mrs. Harmon took the phone once
more before the conversation closed.
"Can I write to you, Tom?" Harmon
answered, "Don't write, because I
]jwve no address yet."
Throughout the conversation Mrs.
Harmon had shown considerable ex-
citement, but calmed down after it
was over. The three-minute talk
was enough to dispel any doubts in
the minds of members of the Har-
mon family that Tom was well.
Coach Crisler reported yesterday
that he had received a description of
the accident from the War Depart-
ment in Washington.
"They spoke of Tom's plane hav-
ing failed," he said, "and of all crew
members bailing out over Dutch Gui-
ana. Tom was the last to leave the
crippled ship and was separated
from his men.
"He beat his way through the
dense jungles for four days before
being picked up by some friendly na-
tives who took him to their village.
Tom protested against resting and
wanted to look for the other men.
"The same thing happened when
Tom was taken to a base hospital.
Army officials refused to allow him
out, and sent an expedition in search
of the missing crew (including Tom's
buddy and co-pilot. Lieut. F. 0. Wie-
ting.)
"As far as they know at this time
there is no news concerning the
missing crew," Crisler reported.
As far as could be learned, Harmon
suffered more from shock and ex-
posure than from injury in the 'chute

lie officials will throw out the first
balls at all of these games, with War
Manpower Commissioner Paul V.
McNutt assuming the chief responsi-
bility by substituting for President
Roosevelt at tomorrow's contest in
the Capital.
There also will be band music, rais-
ing of flags, including the hoisting
of the American League pennant at
Yankee Stadium with league presi-

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Michigan Daily. FOR SALE

dent William Harridge officiating,
and other traditional trappings of
inaugural games. This year service
men also will take part in the cere-
monies at many parks.
Another traditional factor in the
opening games, the weather, is both-
ering the Major League magnates
and fans alike again this year in
spite of the fact that the start of the
season is a week later than usual.

WEi DO OUR P-RRT
Gargoyle
Absorbs mailing charges for subscriptions
sent to a soLdier in any camp. Do YOUR
part and send him GARGOYLE.
April Issue Now On Sale... 20c a copy
Phone 23-24-1 .. . or
Buy it at the Student Publications Bldg.

El

a7*ff ,$~

-.Wdd M

WANTED
MAN'S high-speed gear bicycle in
A-i condition. Balloon tires. Write
Box 85; Michigan Daily,
WANTED-Used clothes. Best prices
paid. Ben the Tailor, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. Phone 5387 after 6 p.m.

35 MM. FILM LOADS-IDENTIFI-
CATION PHOTOS. For 36-hour
service come to 802 Packard. 6:30-
7:30 weekdays.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price.

If

-T-

Until

Victory!f

WAR BONDS Issued Here!
Continuous from 1 P.M.

pp,

kNow!

1943's TOP MUSICAL!

MEATis needed by our fighting ien. As a result,
we, the Americans at home, can no longer have the
variety or the quantity of meat that we formerly
enjoyed. The ALLENEL, like all restaurants, can-
not offer you lthe wide selection of neats that ap-
peared on our peacetime menu. IJowever, ALLEN-

I

EL lobster and trout dinners are still as delicious
as ever, and these meat substitutes are not rationed.
It is not unpatriotic to dine out; it IS patriotic to
choose those foods that are most available, yet
healthful and satisfying to your taste.

ir
Sta l

Get your 1943 MICHIGANENSIAN
while the price is only.
Af ter April 22.,. remember that
date. . . Thursday, April 22
the price will be $5.00
it IT1P, II PA -ATI XT 1A AV

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