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April 14, 1943 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-04-14

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 1943

PAGE SIX WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 1943

Cancer Fund Campaign
Scheduled for October
Women's Field Army To Unite with War
Chest in Drive; Education Program Starts

For the first time since its estab-
lishment the Ann Arbor unit of the
Women's Field Army for the control
of cancer will not hold its annual
fund-raising drive during April, na-
tional cancer control month.
The drive will be held in October
as part of the Ann Arbor War Chest
campaign, Mrs. H. Marvin Pollard,
commander of the Ann Arbor Fidid
Army, announced yesterday.
Although the financial drive for
the month is being delayed, the edu-
cational campaign will be carried on
as usual. The aim of the campaign
is to inform the public concerning
cancer cause and prevention.
Dr. Riecker To Speak
Dr. Herman H. Riecker will open
the campaign at 2 a.m. today, speak-
ing on cancer over radio station
WKAR, under the sponsorship of the
Women's Field Army of Ann Arbor.
Members of the Neighborhood
War Clubs will cooperate in the can-
cer educational drive by distributing
literature on the disease with copies
of the war clubs' publication, "Cues",
in a house-to-house canvass in the
residential districts. Mrs. Poltard
said that this distribution will be
made about May 1.
To Inform Public
The Field Army has also made lit-
erature concerning the progress and
prevention -of the disease available
to visitors in St. Joseph's and Uni-
versity hospitals, two of the organ-
izations to which the Field Army
regularly contributes a portion of
their funds.
In the past four years Ann Arbor
Field Army has raised approximately
Chas. Witting Ends
27 Years of Service
After almost 27 years of faithful
serviced as janitor at the University
Observatory, Charles Witting has re-
tired at the age of 88.
Much admired by everyone in the
astronomy department as a thor-
ough and conscientious worker, Mr.
Witting has served that department
since 1915.
The late Dr. Heber D. Curtis, head
of the astronomy department, once
said, "I wish I could be as fine a man
as Charlie."
"He kept the building especially
clean, and was a. reliable and fine
man," Miss Mary E. Lindsey, seis-
mologic assistant, said.
At four or five each morning he
arrived to do his work and was done
by noon, according-to Miss Lindsey.
Before coming to Ann Arbor he
was a farmer in South Dakota, but
when his youngest son entered the
University of Michigan the entire
family moved here.

$6,000 in the annual campaigns. Of
this, $1,650 has been divided equally
between St. Joseph and University
Hospital over the last three years
for diagnosis of suspected cancer in
semi-indigent patients and research
work on cancer, Mrs. Pollard said.
To Help Research
The remainder goes to the state
office, two-thirds being spent on
educational efforts in Michigan and
one-third being forwarded to the
national office to help finance re-
search work, she said.
In commenting on the campaign
to be held in the fall, Walter A.
Geske of the Ann Arbor Community
Fund said that the united drive will
include all war agencies and other
local agencies and the quotas for the
various groups of the funds raised
will be set later by an executive com-
mittee.
Rose Grentzer
To Lead Concert
Program To Feature
Two Original Scores
Original scores of two compositions
written especially for the occasion
will be presented at the American
Music Program at 8:30 p.m. tomor-
row in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
The program is being given by
Sigma Alpha Iota and is under the
direction of Rose Marie Grentzer.
Admission for the concert will be
a purchase at the door of a war
stamp or bond, in cooperation with
the national drive.
Premieres of "Eleventurous Dan-
ces" by Jeanne Boyd, and "A Prayer
for the Old Courage" by Eric De-
Lamarter will highlight the program.
Also included are numbers by Wil-
liam Stubbins and Randall Thomp-
son.
Miss Boyd received her entire mu-
sical education in this country and
has taught in Chicago since 1914.
For the past thirteen years she has
been with the American Conserva-
tory of Music. She is also an honor-
ary member of the Alpha Chapter of
Sigma Alpha Iota, music fraternity.
Several times Mr. DeLamarter has
appeared as guest conductor of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra and for
ten years he was a music critic in
Chicago.
The fraternity's national presi-
dent, Mrs. John Davidson, will be
here for the program. During her
stay she will be the guest of Martha
Cook Dormitory.

14th Conference
On Education
To Meet Here
'U' School of Education
To Sponsor One-Day
Teacher Discussions
The fourteenth annual conference
on Teacher Education will meet in
Ann Arbor tomorrow as part of the
program of the Michigan School-
masters' Club.
The one-day conference, sponsored
by the University School of Educa-
tion, will consist of two main ad-
dresses, luncheon, and round-tables
based on the reports of the Michi-
gan Cooperative Teacher Education
Study.
Chairman J. B. Edmonson, Dean
of the School of Education, will open
the conference at 9:30 a.m. tomor-
row in the University High School
auditorium, introducing David M.
rrout, director of the Michigan Study
of Teacher Education. Mr. Trout
will discuss major conclusions of the
Teacher Education Study.
Discussion of the major findings of
the study will be thrown open to con-
ference members in a series of round-
table discussion from 10:10 to 11:30
a.m.
Following the round-tables, Prof.
Clifford Woody of the School of Ed-
ucation and director of the Bureau
of Educational Reference and Re-
search, will outline the next steps in
Teacher Education.
Conference members will meet for
luncheon at 12:15 p.m. at the Union.
Dr. Karl Bigelow of the American
Council on Education will address
the group.
The School of Education's annual
convocation honoring students plan-
ning to enter the teaching profes-
sion will be held at 4:15 p.m. in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Dr.
Bigelow, final speaker of the con-
ference, will talk on "The Duty of
Freedom." Names of therecipients
of the Hinsdale and Payne Awards
will be announced.
Mrs. Vogan Will Present
Organ Recital Here Today
Mrs. Frieda Op't Holt Vogan of the
School of Music faculty will present
an organ recital at 4:15 p.m. today
in Hill Auditorium.
Mrs. Vogan will open her program
with Marcello's "Psalm XIX," which
she will follow with "Concerto in D
Minor" by Vivaldi-Bach. She will
then play Bach's. "Pantaisic and
Fugue in C Minor" and Vierne's
"Symphonie No. 4."
The last organ recital of the se-
mester will be given at 4:15 p.m.
Good Friday by Palmer Christian.
"THEY GIVE THEIR
LIVES-YOU LEND
YOUR f*ONEY"
Buy More
War Bonds Today

POCTURE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWWS

i

D E R B Y F A V 0 R I T E-Count Fleet, winter book favorite
in the 1943 Kentucky Derby, shown with Johnny Longden up at
,elmont Park, New York. A son of Reigh Count. the colt showed
great speed last year. Mrs. John Hertz is the owner.

C U N - W E L L P U L P I T-From the well on the aft gun deck
of a Liberty ship carrying supplies to Southwest Pacific posts,
. S. Army Chaplain Walter McCracken conducts religious ser-,
vices while two gunners keep a lookout.

&ft il/a ((erg,

[verf

irt

COvj

cIt
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C R E E N - Forstmann olive
green gabardine was chosen by
Anthony Blotta for this classic-
dressmaker spectator sport frock.
The slanting flap pockets and flap
cuffs are new. Skirt .is only
slightly flared, and the belt is
rust alligator.

S N A R L I N G W E L C 0 ME- This is the kind of greeting.
C visitors get from one of the more ferocious Ringling felines.

B R I T I S H - Norman Hart-
nell, leading British designer,
created this suit of navy blue
slacks, worn with a camel-col-
ored duffle coat and a wool taf-
feta check blouse. It was de-
scribed as the feature of a spring
show in London.

a.
4

PRI NG

PRINT

7

Exquisite Spring prints and just in time for
Easter! We couldn't bring you better news
or more charming fashions.
SHEERS - CREPES - JERSEYS
116.95
Juniors' - Misses' - Women's Sizes

C.
'a-

This store will close Wednesday at 4:30 and reopen
Thursday at 10:00 a.m. This will enable our em-
ployees to participate in the Bond Drive Paiade
Wednesday and the Bond Sales Rally Thursday.

TT% "

L O O K 0 U T S A L O F T - Lookouts on this sailing vessel

S IGN HERE, PLEASE - Little Colleen Kelly gets the
autograph of Judith Evelyn, Broadway star, outside the theatre.

Ii

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