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April 04, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 104i

THt 9.1-CRTC-Alq -lriA-lrf.V

PAft, ttffft

PA~~W1

ill!-

Holiday

Beats

Kiefer

To

Feature

AAU

Swimming

Meet

Crisler Invites All Men to Grid
Practice, Regardless ofAbility

Michigan Medley Trio Wins;
Ohio State Takes Team Title

I

I f

|I

We Did Right Well

1 TEACiHER

VS. PUPILS:

I ;

I

c-"If"Woo qp"12"A-1 I

By JACK MARTIN
Coach H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler's spring
football hopefuls, weather permit-
ting, will take the field tomorrow to
prepare themselves for next fall's
gridiron campaigns. And, consider-
ing the unfavorable attitude of the
Army toward inter-collegiate ath-
letics for their men, Coach Crisler
and his staff are trying to get all
boys possible out for the practice
sessions.
In fact, any male who even knows
what a football looks like will receive
a royal welcome Monday. "We want'
everybody out no matter what their
experience," declares Crisler.
Monday's turnout will actually be
a measure of whether it is advisable
to continue football or not, so the
coaching staff emphasizes the in-
Exhibition Baseball

portance of everyone coming out who
can. And this applies to the frosh
as well as the upper classes; it is
freely predicted all over the nation
that next fall's football squads will
be composed largely of freshmen.
This year's spring practice will be
simplified a great deal in comparison
to previous seasons. It will be de-
voted to conditioning primarily, with
no pressure applied.
No Strategy To Be Planned
No grand strategy for the fall will
be mapped out, due to the impossi-
bility of determining who will be on
the team. The only thing known is
that many boys who would never
have played in normal times will be
on hand.
Attending the practice sessions
will take the place of going to PEM
for the rest of the semester. The
daily work-outs actually will provide
more consistent training, and those
going out have the opportunity of
preparing themselves better for the
armed services.
Few Lettermen Available
Only a few of last year's lettermen
will be available for the spring drills.
geading the list of those coming out,
however, will be All-American Julie
Franks, one of the finest guards in
Michigan history. Also planning to
be out are tackles Bill Pritula and
Bob Derleth.
Many football "M" men are out
for other sports at the present. Mer-
vin Pregulman is training for the
shot-put on Coach Ken Doherty's
track squad; and four more are on
Coach Ray Fisher's baseball nine:j
Bob Wiese, Don Lund. Paul White,;
and Bob Stenberg.
AflhIEC

NEW YORK, April 3.-- (A-')- The
winning streak that has gone 'round
the world-a string so long that no
one knows just how many triumphs
it includes-came to an end tonight
right where it began.
Overshadowing everything else in
the two-day National AAU swim-
ming championships, even a per-
formance like Ohio State's romp to
the tam title, Adolph Kiefer was
beaten in the finals of the 150-yard
backstroke to close out a reign that
began back in 1935, has carried
through 22 national championships
and is so long that Adolph, himself,
can only "guess it includes about 250
wins."
Michigan's Harry Holiday, six-foot
five 200 pound sophomore from But-
ler, Pa., turned
the trick by scant
inches, and he
had to splash to a
pool record of
1:32.8 to do it in
the New York A.
C.'s 25-yard tank.
He overhauled the
veteran Chicagoan
.~on the last lap ,
after Adolph mis-
sed the final turn,
and held on ten-
aciously to wipe
out Kiefer's string.
At the finish,
the Buckeyes eas-
HOLIDAY ily dethroned Yale
as the top team, with 46 points to 34
for Michigan and 22 for the Eli's.
Michigan Takes Both Relays
Michigan picked up its only other
first of the evening when the medley
relay squad of Holiday, Irv Einbinder

and Captain Jack Patten triumphed
over Yale and Ohio in 2:56. The
Wolverines made a sweep of the re-
lays, as they won the freestyle event
on Friday.
In the 100-yard freestyle Yale's
Alan Ford, holder of the world rec-
ord at the distance, just touched out
Wolverine Mert Church in the fast
time of 51.8. Patten was fourth be-
hind MacFadden of Yale.
Alex Canja of Michigan finished
sixth in the three-meter dive, won
by Buckeye Frank Dempsey, victor
in the one-meter contest on Friday.
Ohio's Hawaiian star, Bill Smith,
beat out teammate Keo Nakama in
the 440-yard freestyle with a time
of 4:42.7 to take his second title.
In winning the title, the Buckeyes
thus rounded out a one-year cham-
pionship spree that also included the
National, outdoor title, the National
Collegiate crown and the Big Ten
championships, a run that has never
before been equalled.
TAKING

100-Yard Freestyle-Won by Ford. I ,1 J .1 U
Yale; second. Church, Michigan;
third, MacFadden. Yale; fourth, Pat- W ith First Si
ten, Michigan; fifth-, Smith, Ohio
State. Time, :51.8.
150-Yard Backstroke - Won by: By JEAN GASKELL
Holiday, Michigan; second, Kiefer, Michigan's golf squad can't wait
Norfolk (Va.) Naval Training Sta- for the start of the intercollegiate
tion; third, Follansbee, Ohio State; mthst rueasii frvly
fourth, Gillet. Yale: fifth, Hedges. matches to arouse a spirit of rivalry,
Ohio State. Time, 1:32.8. so they're already challenging each
440-Yard Freestyle-Won by Smith. other to private practice games.
Ohio State; second, Nakama, Ohio When the weather was warm and
State; third, Rogers, New York A.C.; balmy last week. Bill Ludolph asked
fourth, Kerschner, Mercersburg (Pa.) Coach Ray Cokrtriglt to join him
Academy; fifth, Ryan, Ohio State.
Time, 4:42.7. in one of these "grueling" intra-
Three Meter Dive-Won by Demp- squad matches. Everyone who has
sey, Ohio State; second, Batterman, talked to either of these men longer
Ohio State; third, Athans, Seattle; than five minutes. knows just how
fourth, Buratti, Rutgers; fifth,m.ifjeso
Strong, Ohio State, sixth, Canja, much this type of battle means to
Michigan; seventh, Kelly, Athol, each of them. Bill likes nothing
Mass. better, well, almost nothing better,
300-Yard Medley Relay-Won by than beating "Corky."
Michigan (Holiday, Einbinder, Pat- Coach Finishes Ahead
ten); second, Yale; third, Ohio State;
fourth, Rutgers; fifth, Princeton. Thursday the cards were stacked
Time, 2:56. against Ludolph. True, the coach
Final Standings: Ohio State, 46; got off to a bad start and had to
second, Michigan, 34; third, Yale, 22: come out of "ambush" on his second
fourth, Rutgers, 13. shot, but that was, only the begin-
ning. Bill said. "He may be in trou-
ble for a minute. but at the end he'll
be right up in there." And in the
IT EASY end Courtright was leading.
Neither of the rivals wanted their
first scores down on paper, but they
kept count of each shot. Bill hopes
LLENSKI for some more spring weather in a

to Fairways
ms of Spring
couple of days, so he'll have another
chance to beat his coach.
While all this dueling was going
on between Courtright and Ludolph,
they were partners against a couple
of other pretty good golfers. Roscoc
Bonisteel, Jr., caught up with the
two on the third hole, and went on
with them. Then on the seventh the
trio picked up Bob Fife, and he and
"Bonny" paired up against Bill and
"Corky.12
Foursome Tours Nine Holes
This foursome went around acom-
plete nine together. "A good time
was had by all" aptly describes the
match. But at the same time the
fellows got in some good drives and
there were some warm putters on
the greens. Courtright and Ludolph
won the match, but everyone seemed
well pleased just being able to get
the feel of the clubs, and under real
playing conditions again.
Apparently the entire squad felt
that way. Nearly all of the men
were 'out over the week-end to take
advantage of the excellent playing
conditions. Doug Beath, Bob WeDl-
ing, Fred Brandenberg and Paul
O'Hara, were only a few of the fel-
lows that could be spotted on the
links.

Chicago (N) 040 002 001- 7 8
Detroit (A) . .100 034 40x-12 21
Cinc'i (N) ..000 120 000 02-5 15
Chicago (A) 000 120 000 0P-3 S
Cleveland (A) 010 200 000 0-3 5
Pittsb'gh (N) 000 000 021 1-4 9

2
6

Jersey City (I) . .001 330- 7
New York (N) . . .700 64x-17
Boston (A) .. .000 010 000-1
Brooklyn (N) 200 021 00x-5

9
14
2
7
4
7

1
0
3
0
5
1
1
1
2
2

By ED ZA

Dalily S8port s Editor
* * 0 0

New York (A) 000 010
Newark (1) . .011 000

010-2
0lx-3

W ARD

FW V 0IL-SP

* MEN AND THE SEA ... vivid pictures
of men who man our merchant marine-
* DIVIDE AND CONQUER
* LISTEN TO BRITAIN
* PRICE OF VICTORY
Educational films. Informative pictures about the many
phases of the war, dealing with the status and progress
of the war. Shows specific ways that you can help in the
war effort.
Kellogg Auditorim: Dental Building

Wakefield Stars
Against Cubs
EVANSVILLE, Ind., April 3.-(/P_
Rookie Dick Wakefield blasted a long
homer and three singles -to drive in
six runs today as the Detroit Tigers
shelled the Chicago Cubs, 12 to 7, in
an exhibition game.
Wakefield, the former Michigan
collegian upon whom the Tigers are
banking heavily this season, also
grabbed another honor-he escaped
being charged with any of the six
Detroit errors.
Led by Dick, the ^Tigers pounded
Paul Derringer, Lonnie Warneke, Ed
Hanyzewski and big Bill Fleming
for 21 safetis, the latter being
charged withi the loss.
Meantime, Hal Newhouser, Virgil
Trucks and Hal Manders were limit-
ing the Cubs to eight hits. Trucks
was credited with the victory, his
second in the Red Flannel league.
Hits Safely in First Inning
Wakefield singled off Derringer
in the first frame, driving in Ned
Harris, who had tripled. In the fifth,
Dick singled to right, chasing in
Trucks, and the following frame he
hit sharply to center, driving in two
more runs. His homer, a 400-foot
inside-the-park drive to the score-
board in center, came off Fleming in
the seventh with Cramer aboard.
Wakefield wasn't the only rookie
to hit the ball often. Shortstop Joe
Hoover likewise gathered four hits,
all singles.

Dishing It Out .
T'S AMAZING what passes in front
of you as you stand in the "K.P."
serving line at Fort Custer and dish
out food to the unending lines of
rookies and soldiers who stream into
the rpess halls three times a day.
Philosophic meditation is much more
delightful than visions of the hours
still to be worked.
It was during our second straight
16-hour shift that we noticed a
ruddy-faced, blond lad with a huge
orange "I" on his jacket. It looked
like Don Gladdinig, the Illinois
miler, whom we saw in action in
the Big Ten Indoor Conference
meet last month at Chicago.
"You're Gladding?" we asked him,
and it was. "What happened to you
at the Conference?" was our second
question. "The company was too fast
for me," he replied. "What are you
doing in this-camp?" He answered,
"Uncle Sam was having a party and
invited me." About that time some-
one started yapping for apples (in
our charge), so we bid Don a cheer-
ful (?) farewell and went on serv-
ing-...
IT WAS INTERESTING to look
over the new rookies as they
filed in the door. We had no trou-
ble picking Out the ERC's from the
ordinary draftees. All we had to
do was look at their faces. The
lads who appeared bored by the
procedure were usually college
ERC's. There were draftees who
ate as if they had never seen a
plate before, and who handled a
fork as if they were pitching hay.
A lot of the Illinois ERC's were
talking about the great basketball
team they had at Champaign this
past season. We asked one of our
new acquaintances from Illinois,
what had started them off. "The

And, looking back over the line
of hungry soldiers, lie picked out
Gene Vance, Ken Menke, Jack
Smiley and Art Mathisen. Missing
was the forward and high scorer,
Andy Phillip, who set a new Con-
ference scoring record. When one
of the boys asked us, "What kind
of a basketball team did Michigan
have th isYear," we, quickly
changed the subject...
MIKE DANN, who served as assis-
tant sports editor of The Michi-
gan Daily last fall, dropped the edit
gang a letter from Camp Roberts,
Calif., where he is undergoing basic
training. With Mike are Walt Klee,
a former staff member; Bob Mantho,
another ex-Daily writer; Jim Dan-
iels, promotion and sales analyst of
The Daily; and Phil Swander ...
Howe Returns to Wing
Lineup for Game Tonight
DETROIT, April 3.- OP)- The
Detroit Red Wings, heavy favorites
now over the Boston Bruins in the
Stanley Cup hockey finals, will be
bolstered for the second game to-
morrow night by the return of Syd
Howe, veteran forward who was in-
jured in Toronto last Saturday.
Manager Jack Adams said Howe
would be used on the liniment line
with Don Grosso and Eddie Wares.
On the other hand, the Bruins will
be strengthened, too, by the return
of Jack Crawford, who has been out
with an ankle injury.

Whiz Kids are
formed us.

in Camp," he in-

(I'
Ate-
1rtion-
V ,Ourecoop burden
nnecessarr we
e na ne norder 6
bese b~e pto
of these iur 01o
rnoy s dc
s uce yoressc
SerVlc
needs
Lree"~C6
I . . .....
X-4:

rul

Sunday, April 4

FREE 8:15-9:15 P.M.

Contributed by THE MICHIGAN UNION

F-

a

V

1 ,
*

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11

PITCH
I N...t
Spring brings thoughts of
BASEBALL. Start off the
season right with some good
equipment. It's a prime fac-
tor in bringing up your bat-
ting average for this season.
Fine equipment for all of
your baseball needs. BATS,
BALLS, SHOES, GLOVES,
SQCKS, CAPS, and other
necessary items. Come in
and get yours now.
--____TUE RFCT EI.M. KPATI M.InI l

T he
Go es
Due to the new

Allenel

to

War

TRACY AND HEPBURN
ARE TOGETHER AGAIN!
The stars and producers of "Woman
of the Year" again combine their
talents to bring you the Picture of
the Year . . an intriguing romantic
story beautifully told and acted!
EGdURN
in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's

9

rationing regulations we must

reduce the amount of meat to be consumed at the
Allenel. This means that you may not be able to
obtain one of our famous meat dishes at the par.
ticular time you may desire it. However, lobster
and seafood are not rationed and you may still
enjoy the best of fish served in tht unforgettable
Allenel manner.
A though you may not receive all the meat
you may desire, you will still receive the

/

/

M Ag

FLAME

WITH
RICHARD WHORF
MARGARET WYCHERLY
FO RREST TUCKER

"DUMB HOUNDED"
Volor Cartoon

11

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11

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