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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1943 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-03-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,

Michigan Students

Welcome

Military

Units to

University

Army Groups
In ect Chanoes
In Activities
Daily To Present News
Of Particular Interest
To Service Men's Units
To the men in khaki who have
come in hundreds to Ann Arbor this
winter, injecting a vigorous spirit
and military air into campus life, the
students of Michigan extend a hearty
welcome.
Marching columns and shouts of
"one, two, three-hup!" are rapidly
becoming familar to student who
once stared at a soldier's uniform
ald jumped aside with a start as
a unit went by. In a little over a
year a civilian-minded campus has
been turned into a vital manpower
plant, offering its educational, rec-
reational and living facilities to
the military men. Dorms which
were centers for 'Joe College' bull
sessions and swing fests have been
stripped and refurnished in army
style. Students are shifting their
classrooms to make space for sol-
diers. The entire campus has been
affected by these new conditions
and has been given a chance to
contribute to wartime adjust-
I ments.
In its pre-military days the Mich-
igan Daily, functioning as an organ
for student expression, had reflected
campus trends and activities. Now
that these trends are taking a def in-
ite military turn and a great part of
the campus has been turned over to
the army, The Daily wishes to incor-
porate the new trend in its policy.
It wishes to bring to readers a pic-
ture of life in the barracks as well as
in the dormitory, and to deal with
items that will interest the doughboy
and sailor, as well as the student.
It wishes to make this campus as
pleasant a place as possible for the
fighting men of our country to live
in while they are training.
The Daily brings students news of
both local and world events. Associ-
ated Press teletype machines have
enabled The Daily to bring the latest
national, state and international
news to .its readers, keeping them in
touch with world affairs. Other arti-
cles, covering all University activities,
have reflected campus life. Latest
sports events are covered daily and
all campus events are kept up-to-.date
for students. For its reporting, cover-
age and presentation The Daily has
consistently received top national
honors awarded to college news-
papers.
Wishing to maintain this stand-
ard in interpreting campus ac-
tivities, The Daily will be modified
to cover military as well as civilian
events. Through contributions from
soldiers, and by the publication of
a special weekly supplement espe-
cially for service men, The Daily
will reflect this new military trend.
In addition, world news, sports
events and local stories will con-
tinue to play a large part.
I It is hoped that this new policy
may bring a greater unity and under-
standing between students and ser-
vice men, and that through this
medium soldiers and civilian-students
alike may feel themselves co-part-
ners, .1haing together campus and
college facilities.
Rejectee Demands That
Brother Share His Fate

DES MOINES, Iowa, March 12.-
(A3)- State Selective Service officials
today received a letter from a rejec-
ted man who protested against a
ruling declaring him unfit for ser-
vice.
"Now that' you have turned me
down," the letter said, "you, in all
fairness, must discharge my brother
from the service. I never saw the
day that I couldn't lick him."
State officials said the brother
was overseas somewhere.
SEATTLE, March 12.-(AP)-An in-
terlocutory divorce decree granted
Mrs. Claude Bowers specified she
was to have sole custody of the 78
cans of food in the family pantry.

1694th ServiceUnit Marches to Class

Like visions of the SATC of World War I are the men of the 1694th
service unit, shown marching to classes from their headquarters in the
Union.
One of the first specialist units to arrive on campus as part of the
plan to take advantage of University facilities throughout the country
for the training of men in the armed services, this unit took over
a large section of the Union for barrack and study purposes.
Using the hotel facilities of the Union for sleeping quarters, the
soldiers eat and study in what were formerly private dining rooms
which have been converted for their use into a mess hall.
ATTENTION, SERVICEMEN!
Soldier, Add Your Contribution
To New Tabloid Service Edition
Servicemen on the University of Michigan campus, please note!..
Starting next Sunday The Michigan Daily will publish a weekly
tabloid supplement written for and by servicemen stationed on this
campus.
For a long while The Daily staff has sought a way to make the
paper of greater interest and importance to the soldiers and sailors
who are being trained and who will be trained on this campus. We
want The Daily to mean as much to you as it does to the other stu-
dents on campus. In the new tabloid service edition we think we
have found the answer.
What will be in the new service edition? The answer to that is
simple-what you servicemen want and are interested in..
This is a frank invitation to write your own newspaper.
This servicemen's supplement will appear each Sunday with the
regular Daily in an eight-page tabloid form. We hope that you ser-
vicemen, from general to rooky and from admiral to bluejacket, will
supply most of the writing for your paper, so that it will have the
news you want to read. This means opportunities for all kinds of
writing, coverage of your athletic program which promises to be very
active; sports columns of all sorts; news of happenings in your train-
ing; columns interpreting world affairs, editorials, humor, anything
you want.
For our part we will provide the articles of general interest to
servicemen that come through our wire service and through the sev-
eral news services which the Army and Navy supply. The tabloid will
include pictures, cartoons and all the features of interest, humor and
news.
We will welcome all suggestions on ways to make the tabloid
what you want, but most of all we want you to write it. Contact will
be made with those men interested in writing for the tabloid and
arrangements will be made wherever necessary. Any contributor is
welcome to use the typewriters and other facilities of the Publications
Building.

Servicemen
Are Offered
Amiusemients
Entertainment and Fun
Available for Soldiers;
Theatres Reduce Prices
Looking around for a way to pack
his few leisure hours off-post with
as much fun and entertainment as
possible, the serviceman will find
that Ann Arbor has a variety of sug-
gestions.
There are five motion picture
theatres, all offering special rates
to service men. The shows run at
1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m. daily and change
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Starting today at the Michigan,
603 E. Liberty St., is "Yankee Doodle
Dandy," starring James Cagney and
Joan Leslie. At the State, located
at the junction of Liberty and State
Streets, is "Reunion in France" star-
ring Joan Crawford.
The three downtown theatres are
the Whitney, 117 N. Main St., now
showing, "We Are the Marines" and
"Eye in the Underworld"; the Or-
pheum, 326 S. Main St., showing
"Wake Island" and "Small Town
Boy"; the Wuerth, 320 S. Main St.,
showing "Iceland," with Sonja Henie.
Bowling Alleys.Available
. Men who are bowling fans have
the choice of six different alleys. The
two largest are the Ann 'Arbor Rec-
reation building at 605 E. Huron,
and the Twentieth Century Recrea-
tion building at 214 W. Huron, each
containing 12 alleys. The Michigan
Recreation building, 525 E. Liberty,
has three alleys plus table tennis
and table pool facilities.' The Roll
Bowl Association, 209 E. Washing-
ton, contains eight alleys.
At the Michigan Union six bowling
alleys, plus table pool and table
tennis facilitiesbare available. The
Women's Athletic Building, contain-
ing four alleys, may be used by men
when accompanied by women.
At Barbour and Waterman gym-
nasiums (corner of N. and E. Univer-
sity) "Rec Rallies" take place from
8:30 to 11:00 p.m. on alternate Sat-
urday nights.
Golf Courses Nearby
Golfers will find six courses at
their disposal. The University Golf
Course, on Stadium Blvd., just south
of the stadium is one of toughest and
best-cared-for courses in the state.
Incidentally, its 18 holes have some
of the largest greens in the state.
Municipal Club, a flat 18-hole course
commonly referred to as 'the rock-
pile,' lies behind the University Hos-
pital. Ann Arbor Club and Stadium
Hills Club are both nine-hole courses
and lie south of the stadium. Huron
Valley Club (nine holes) and Bar-
ton Hills Club (18 holes), are both
several miles from the campus.
On warm spring days, soldiers will
like to spend the afternoon walking
and picnicking in Nichols Arboretum,
a natural park along the Huron
River. It can be entered just above
the junction of Geddes and Oxford
Streets.

(Editor's note: Following are ex-
cerpts from- The Outpost,' a monthly
paper published by American soldiers
in. Britain.)
A story was recently reported by
a neutral who was in Germany not
so long ago, which is going the
rounds in that country. It seems
that two officiais of the Nazi Propa-
ganda Ministry, who were rivals for
proinotion, encountered one another
in a Berlin station. Each immedi-
ately suspected the worst-which
was that the other was going to
party headquarters in Munich to
pull strings for advancement. Words

passed, and one-very casually-
mentioned that he was going to
Munich!
They parted, only to "meet again
on the Munich train. The one offi-
cial blurted out-"So! You are going
to Munich. You liar! You told me
you were going to Munich to make
me think you were going somewhere
else!"
* * *
It seems that the "rumor clin-
ics" in America are doing a good
job; and their classification of
these rumors, half of which are

Axis inspired, as "wedge-drivers,
fear-rumors, and pipe dreams, is
first-rate scientific analysis. Here
is one selection from the Axis-
controlled radio for your rumor
clinic:
"Every Englishman, from Chur-
chill to the most insignificant scribe,
is mobilizing for war. But this does
not mean that England is getting
ready for the supreme battle against
Germany, nor for the long-delayed
Second Front in Europe. Oh no!
The present push is directed against
the Americans."

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Japs at Custer
Are Termed*
MDel Soldiers'
FORT CUSTER, Mich., March 13.
- (iP) - Fifty-nine American-born
Japanese who have completed nearly
a full year of army service with the
post headquarters company here
were termed "model soldiers" today
by their company commander, Capt.
Bayard J. Alps, who declared their
military record was "probably un-
equalled by any other organization on
the post."
All of the men were born in this
country. Approximately a fourth have
had at least partial college educa-
tions. A few have visited briefly in
Japan prior to outbreak of the war.
They were assigned to Custer shortly
after the general exodus of Japanese
from the west coast area following
Pearl Harbor.
Capt. Arthur W. Clausen, company
officer, revealed that the skepticism
apparent upon arrival of the Japan-
ese a year ago was soon eliminated.

il - .__ .

THAT'S

LIFE!

you want to keep up on things
wether youre on K.P. or studying.
You'll want to know what's going on on Campus, in Washington,
on the Russian front, everywhere in the world. In Philadelphia
everyone reads the Bulletin, ON CAMPUS EVERYONE READS
THE DAILY.

III

t

YOU CAN READ all about the day's happenings.

The news is

.Wic/tiqan ten at Wa,'

briefly and concisely written so you get a complete picture in the
few minutes you can spare.
YOUR ACTIVITIES on campus will be covered in The Daily.
EVERY SUNDAY, the Service Man's Edition provides a synopsis

of the week's news.

You can clip it out to tell your folks what's

Capt. William H. Wittliff, '41, in a
recent engagement over the Mediter-
ranean, added two more Axis planes
to his list. Capt. Wittliff, a squadron
leader in ,the Interceptor Command,
pilots a Lightning P 38. The captain's
total score now stands at three. Last
month he shot down a German Junk-
er 88, which carried a crew of three,
and twelve machine guns. Capt. Witt-
liff was a member of Phi Eta Sigma,
l-111-an nnnn~r sniet. nd of

nomics and was a member of Inter-'
fraternity Council, and of Sigma Al-
pha Epsilon fraternity.
* * *
Ensign Warren R. King, '41, was
recently ordered to Floyd Bennet
Field, L. I. to await shipment over-
seas. An ensign in the Naval Air
Corps, King was enrolled in the Civil-
ian Pilot Training program while at
the University, and was a member of
the Flying Club. He is affiliated with

going on in Ann Arbor.
There will be special sections in
The Michigan Daily every week
written by you men on this post.

Subscriptions X1.75

for the rest
of the semester

In your mail box every day except Monday

Saleswomen in the East Quadrangle Tomorrow

1111

;I

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