100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1943 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. IJ 11 ,.-511- .trx.cz. i' si l'x . t- i; t

1 11 It A l i 1 t 1 f lV tit ! 1a 1

RATIONING lILEMMA: Diplomats Toast Lend-Lease Operations
Planning Menus for Stockwell . r
Presents PFroblem to Dietitian }

By BETTY KOFFMAN
How to best utilize a supply of four,
thousand two hundred and twenty-
one ration points each week is a prob-
lem that is worrying one young lady
on the campus.
She is Miss Rachel Kaufman, die-
tician at Stockwell Hall, and it is her
job to plan menus for the dormitory,
with the new rationing of food adding
to the complications of her task.
As former meals always required a
plentiful supply of canned goods, Miss
Kaufman is finding it rather diffi-
cujlt to maintain former standards in
filling nutritious requirements.
"The greatest difficulty is that we
not only have to take into considera-
tion the point value of all foods, but
we never can be sure of getting the
items we planned on," she said yes-
terday.
"One of the ways we have tried to

meet the limitations of the rationing
program is by serving more fresh
fruits and vegetables," she explained,
"but that, too, brings trouble, be-,
cause we are short of help and it re-
quires quite a bit of time to prepare
these fresh foods."
The dormitory's supply of meat has
already been cut, she said, to 80 per
cent of the beef, 75 per cent of theI
pork, and 75 per cent of the lamb
used last year.,
By some mistake, Stockwell was
omitted from the calculations for
chocolate milk, so that they share the
supply of Mosher-Jordon by using
its quota every other month.
"We have plenty of coffee right
now and are able to give it to the
girls twice a day," Miss Kaufman
said.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 6) ing beginning with supper at 6:00 p.m.
Program at 6:45 p.m. This is the first
discussion group this evening at 6:30 in meeting in the series "Planning a Civil-
the Russel Parlor. ized Future." The subject will be "Polic-
i ing the World" and will be introduced by
First Methodist Church and Wesley William Muehl, '43L.
Foundation: Communion Service for stu- Trinity Lutheran Church will hold its
dents and others of student age in the services at 10:30 a.m. today with the Rev.
Sanctuary at 8:30 a.m. Class with Pro- H. 0. Yoder speaking on "The Gteatest
fessor George E. Carrothers, leader, at Temptation of Life."
9:30 a.m. Subject for discussion: "Seek-
ing Happiness with the Epicurean." Zion Lutheran Church services will be
Morning Worship at 10:40 o'clock. Dr. conducted at 10:30 a.m. today with Mr.
C. W. Brashares will preach on "Treat- Elmer Christianson speaking on "Christ
ment for Tears." Wesleyan Guild meet- Fought Your Battle Too."
3 21

*
HORSES CAN'T CARRY
TALES .. .
Of course not, but here's some-
thing that really might inter-
est you.

NELSON

EDDY

u1

4

i
,I

NICETIES
f
LuxiLe's newest creation . . . a frilly
bit of femininity that hides be-
neath your frock the smooth way
tIat only a knitted slip can. Made
of fine Jersey tricot fabric trimmed
with embroidered net at top . - -
Embroidered net flounce. In peach,
black, or white, sizes 34 to 42.

,';
4 v Y
f. . f
~-0 :2K :.
, . '

Drinking a toast at a Washington luncheon observing the second
anniversary of lend-lease operations are (left to right) Maxim Litvinoff,
Soviet ambassador; Vice-President Henry A. Wallace, and Lend-Lease
Administrator E. R. Stettinius, Jr. The beverage is milk reconstituted
from dry whole milk such as is used in foreign shipments to conserve
space.
Eddy Closes Choral Union Series
In Hill Auditorium Wednesday

Nelson Eddy, renowned baritone
of radio, pictures and the concert
stage, will appear in the last Choral
Union concert of the current season
when he sings here at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday in Hill Auditorium.
The first part of Eddy's concert
will consist of "Lascia ch'io pianga"
by Handel, "Papagena! Cara! Belle
Tortorella" from the Magic Flute of
Mozart, (My Native Land" by Gret-
chaninoff, "The Bells of Novgorod",
a Russian folk song, "The Old Cor-
poral" and "The Miller" of Dargo-
mizhsky and "The Moon is High"
by Rachmaninoff.
After this group of songs, Theo-
dore Paxson, Eddy's accompanist,
will present three piano selections
by Debussy. These solos are "Pois-
sons d'Or," "Serenade a la Poupee"
and "Jardins Sous La Pluie."
After the intermission Eddy will
present a group of lighter selections.
These will include "As Then the
Tulip" by Lehmann, "You Are so
Young" by Erich Wolff, "Frog Went
A-Courtin'" a Kentucky mountain
song, and "Tomorrow" by Keel,
Eddy will, also sing selections by
MacGimsey, Weatherly and Lippe.
Eddy first learned to sing by lis-
tening to gramaphone records of

v
i
1
7

great operatic baritones. Encour-
aged by David Bispham, Eddy gave
up his work in this country and went
to Europe with his teacher, William
Vilonat, to study.
Returning to the United states,
Eddy did singing of every variety,
recitals in small towns, oratorio en-
gagements and appearances with
many orchestras. He soon became
well-known with all the local con-
cert managers.
It was while Eddy was on tour,
filling an engagement as soloist with
the Los Angeles Philharmonic that
movies entered into his life. Holly-
wood scouts in the concert audience
came to Eddy after that perform-
ance and asked him to make a screen
test. With his first picture, "Naugh-
ty Marietta" his fame began.
In what was probably the greatest
national poll of radio favorites ever
conducted, Nelson Eddy was elected
radio's "star of stars" for 1939, in
Radio Guide's annual contest last
summer. Eddy was also named, for
the fourth consecutive year, radio's
favorite singer of operatic and class-
ical songs.

04?

$3.00

WED.,,MAR.17-8:130
HILL AUDITORIUM
A limited number of tickets still available at offices of
University Musical Society, Burton Tower

34h VAN BUREN S0r
8 NICKELS ARCADE

I

Y x

10

sow*,s

' I ,

/ y,

SI,.r

80,

I

;>,

'round the Corner on State

,%I

1~ .~

C71

1) li

6"

w 1

6tv

I

t -C

4J ..

3+
ray: 3 a .PER

DID YOU KNOW...?
Nelson Eddy can come straight
to you, via the Columbia Mas-
terworks? The Radio & Record
Shop has an ideal group of
Patter Songs from Gilbert &
Sullivan, sung by the famous
baritone. The Chorus and Or-
chestra, conducted by Robert
Armbruster, and your favorite
tunes, and Mr. Eddy, for only
$2.98.
-I-
K M
DID YOU KNOW,...?
That a gorgeous new selection
of Mary Lynne Junior Orig-
inals has entered the Made-
moiselle Shop? You can have
lovely two-piece outfits in ray-
on and silk jersey . . . navy
with taffeta trim, or lace. The
fitted silk jersey dresses have
gay prints and huge floral de-
signs!
DID YOU KNOW...?
You can have foundation
make-up that won't dry your
skin? Calkins-Fletcher has a
treat for you. Campus Colo-
nial Bouquet make-up for only
50c. Something exhilarating . .
.. Pine-Scented Showerub that
soothes and softens the skin
with friction action and bil-
lowy suds. Wooden box, too
only $1!
DID YOU KNOW ...?
That plaid jerkin suits are
spring essentials? Stunning
plaids and plain wool outfits
from the Campus Shop come
in all pastel shades. Don't for-
get to top it off with a smart
sport shirt . . . long or short
sleeved, cottons and silks, in
all colors too.
DID YOU KNOW ..?
Diamond engagement rings
never depreciate in value? Eib-
ler's diamonds mounted on yel-
low gold or platinum are really
breath-taking! Starting at $50,
you can have plain or diamond
adorned settings . . . the dia-
mond or square cut. Remem-
ber that diamonds are sound
investments . .. they last for-
ever.

4i

Gabardines

* Twills
* Herringbone

7'

i

" Shetlands
* Flannels
e Men's Wear

ix

1 0

'(V

Id.

y: y

yve a serving' of beautiful new
ng accessories to whet any
-over's appetite.
BAGS to match your gloves or
shoes . . . from big soft pouches

a

SUITS for revery occasion, to carry you through a

Hansen's custom-made gloves in

long spring.
that are wea

Today smart women are picking clothes
arable, trim, and lasting. Navy, black,
Mostly 1OO% wools. Sizes -10 - 38.

19.9iO

up

a wide variety of styles ... leath-
to
ers, fabrics and colors, from 1.25 to
ety
to 5.00. 10
Slick, tailored or frothy, filmy bloc
and di kies . . . "tops" for any
Collar and cuff sets in white and pa

small envelopes . . in a vari

y of leathers.
.95.

From 3.00 to

L e

and pastels.

I

' ,
/1

,....... ,, . _ 1 .... .. ... . ,. .

uses
suit.
stels

I

DID YOU KNOW . .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan