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March 05, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Bomber Fund
Total Increased
By Fraternities
Interfraternity Ball
And Panhellenic Ball
Donate Total Profits
Much of the $3,000 in cash and
$2,000 in pledges that the Bomber
Scholarship has received during the
current school year has been due to
sorority and fraternity cooperation
with the organization, according to
Coral DePriester, '43E, chairman of
the fund.
With the 25-50 cent plan of con-
tributing a certain amount per mem-
ber for each dance, each house has
made a sizable addition to the Bomb-
er total, DePriester said.
Interfraternity Ball donated $1,000
to the fund, all its profit over ex-
penses. Panhellenic Ball, to be held
in the spring, has pledged all it takes
in, minus expenses.
Victory Vanities, held for the ex-
press purpose of netting cash for the
Bomber fund, was organized and put
on primarily by campus fraternities
and sororites.
One sorority, Delta Delta Delta,
has pledged the sum of $50 per,
month to the Bomber Fund, instead
of contributing only when it holds a

Black Market
Barbers Wield
Bowl, Shears
The black market in barbering is
looking up this week- since Ann Ar-
bor's modest tonsorialentrepreneurs
made their contribution to the high
cost of living.
Illicit baroershops have sprung upI
in dim dormitory and fraternity
rooms where amateur shear-wielders
ruin wavy pompadours, and the only
password is "I brought a bowl."
The Ann Arbor Barbers' Associa-
tion last week reviewed their in-
creased living costs, their shortage
of help, and announced their most
recent rise in the price of haircuts.
But their customers don't realize
it until the last curl is clipped and
the last cowlick slicked down.
Then, the barber smiles, puts the
chair between himself and you and
says casually, "That will be seventy-
five cents, Mister."
And the student walks out of the
shop, wishing he once more was un-
der twelve years old-when he only
would have to pay sixty-five cents
for a head-trimming.
dance. A few other houses, accord-
ing to DePriester, pledge a fixed
amount for each dance, instead of
operating on the 25-50 cent plan.

Mississippi River Ice I'rheaker

NO MORE ICE-BOX RAIDS:
Fraternities Revise Budgets
Because of High Cost of Living

By AL RAYMOND
The advent of rationing has em-
phasized the shortage of food, the
high price of food, and the great
demand for food. Particularly is the
pinch around the belt being felt in
the fraternities, where the former
plentiful supply of food has been
drastically cut.
A canvass of several Washtenaw
fraternities revealed that ninety per
cent of the houses have taken meas-
ures to combat their high food costs,
both by waiting upon themselves,
and by increasing their board bills.
Phi Delta Theta, a pioneer in the
waiting field, began its own waiting
system long ago, and during last
fall's rushing, the "kitchen quartet"
offered barbershop harmony to the
prospective pledges.
Another early entry into the wait-
ing field was Lambda Chi Alpha,
which initiated a waiting system at
the beginning of this semester. Ac-
cording to President Joseph Gwinn,
'44E, this system enabled the house
to operate without raising the board
bill.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, feeling the
pinch more than most fraternities,
because of their former plentiful
meals, employed a dietitian to plan
their meals. Mrs. Marian George, a

dietitian for many years, was for-
merly a captain in the U.S. Army,
and during the World War Mrs.
George cooked for 210 officers and
over 300 women- With years of train-
ing, she has established a balanced
diet with the proper number of vita-
mins, and thus cut down on cost and
quantity without cutting down on
the necessary food for proper nutri-:
tion.
Mrs. George, stating that she prob-
ably realized more than any other
cook, how bad things would eventu-
ally become, wished to "impress upon
them (students) that there are defi-
nite sacrifices needed, and the boys
must cooperate and must under-
stand." With the added physical
exercise off PEM, Mrs. George said
that {a proper diet was even more
essential and made the position of
dietitian even more trying. She em-
phasized that "food must be brought
down to the feeding of the times."
NOTICE
A meeting for the election of
officers of the Wolverines will be
held at 3:00 p.m.-$undgy in Room
304 of the Vnjon All members
must be present.

Scholarships
Are Available
For Lit School
Application plans for special schol-
arships in the College of Literature.
Science and the Arts- are available in
Room 1208 Angell Hall, Dean Lloyd
S. Woodburne, head of the literary
college scholarship committee, said
yesterday.
These scholarships will be. awarded
for the -summer term as well as the
fall and spring terms of 1942-43. All
blanks must be returned to Dean
Woodburne's office not later than
April 1.
Some of the scholarship funds
available have been maintained by
contributions from private individ,
uals and contain certain stipulations
regarding racial and regional factors,
he said.
However, the special faculty schol-
arship fund provided by University
faculty members is awarded to stu-
dents on the bases of mental apti-
tude, academic merit, and actual
need.
Dean Woodburne advised interest-
ed students to consult a.special book-
let available in Room 4 University
Hall, which contains specific data
and the requirements for each- award.

The Mississippi River ice-breaker,"Del Commune," which will
smash river ice between St. Louis and St. Paul, Minn., is readied at
St. Louis for its trio up the river to break a passageway through the
ice and permit early spring navigation by barges.
Educator Lands Kelly Surveys
School System Costs of Lvig

CLASSIFIED ADVERITISING

n

Jligh School Teachers
Doing Excellent Job
In spite of criticisms by employers,
college professors and parents, Dr.

Problems of Grocers,
Consumers Studied

I
1

CLASSIFIED
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words-)
Contract Rates on Request
HELP WANTED
BOOKKEEPER WANTED to handle
small set of books. Good oppor-
tunity. Follett's Michigan Book-
store. 322 S. State.
GU[OMAR
NQAVAZES
BRAZ ILIAN
PIANIST I

WANTED
WANTED-Radio Victrola combina-
tion or small Victrola. Notify Box
Number 14.
WANTED: Used clothes. Best prices
paid. Ben the Tailor, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. Phone 5387 after 6 p.m.
WANTED - Part time teacher for
bookkeeping, typewriting, business
English or allied subjects. Call 3330
or 2-4682 for interview.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
TYPING
MISS ALLEN--Experienced typist-
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
LOST and FOUND
PLEASE return photograph of my
sister taken from Pi Phi house Jan.
8. Barbara Hulbert.
LOST-B6nrus gold band watch be-
tween South Wing and University
Hospital. Call 8598, Margaret Heise.'
MISCELLANEOUS
PARTY PHOTOGRAPHS and IN-
FORMAL PORTRAITS by appoint-
ment only. Phone 2-4726.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought,
rented, repaired. Student and Of-
fice Supplies. O. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.
MICHIGAN
THE GREAT HEART
STORY OF OUR TIME I

LANSING. March 4-R)--Gover-
nor Kelly moved in today on prob-

George E. Carrothers, Bureau in Co- lems of mounting cost of living and
operation with Other Institutions, farmers' complaints that the national
opertionwithOthe .~government while calling upon them
stated in a recent grticle in the Sec- for increased production has placed
ondary School Principals' magazine stumbling blocks in their path.
that the quality of work done in high The Governor offered his office as
school is better today than at any a forum for complaints of the con-
suming public, specifying that he
previous time. Iwould receive only letters properly
Many criticisms of the school sys- signed and stating specific incidents
tem can be explained by the addi- of asserted unjustified rises in food
tional load now handled by teachers prices.
taking over the duties formerly cared On a third tangent, he assailed
black market practices and promised
for by the home, church and commu- to throw full weight of his office in
nity, Dr. Carrothers said. The article; the fight against them.
placed the responsibility for the in- Declaring he was impressed with
adequate system on the following assertions that cost of non-rationed
points. foodstuffs soared with advent of ra-
"The Santa Claus Notion"- mod- tioning of other foodstuffs, the Gov-
TnecatrsasorigtonDr-marenor created a special fact finding
en educators, according to Dr. Car- committee through which chain and
rothers, are now giving too much to independent grocers will be allowed
students. They allow students of less to voice their views on the subject,
ability to be admitted to normal and announced he would give con-
schools rather than into other profes- sumers an active unit in the defense
sional schools. council to fight their battles for

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE OROANIZATION AT TflE. UNIVERSITY orv MICIiGAN
ANN 'ARBOR, MICHIGAN
,znnonces
A FRTEE L ECTUiRt ON CI4RISTIAN SCIENCE
cnlified
Christian $cience: The Revektion o:f he Rights and tCharacter of Man
by
JAMES G. ROWELL, C.S. .
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church, The First Church
of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
at
The lydia Mendelssohn Theatre in the Michigan League
Monday Evening, March l, 1943, at 8.:00 o'clock
TIE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND

i!

The article condemned the currentI
emphasis on teaching instead of
learning and the constant tutorial
presence of teachers. "Secondary
schools," Dr. Carrothers said, "are
falling down by allowing the annual
'let down' take place in the senior
year.-
War Activities Films
Will Be Presented
A series of Sunday evening movies
on war activities will be presented by,
the University Extension Service and
the Michigan Union at 8:15 to 9:15
p. m. beginning March 14 in the aud-
itorium of the Kellog Dental Build-
ing.
These films, furnished by the Bu-
reau of Visual Education film library,
have been chosen because they are,
of special interest to service men
and reservists as well as to the cam-
pus and community. The programsI
will feature movies of campuses "on
the march" throughout the country.I
The programs for the March ser-
ies are: March 14, "Campus on the
March," "Negro Colleges in War-
time," "Manpower" and "Battle is
Our Business;" March 21, "Airplane
Changes Our World Map," Youth
Takes to Wings" and "Weather;"
March 28, "Target for Tonight" and
"Food Convoy."
The movies to be shown in the Ap-
ril programs are: April 4, "Divide
and Conquer," "Listen to Britain,"
tMen and the Sea" and Price of Vic-
tory;" April 11, "Mexico Builds a

them.
He appointed Willis R. Keasey, of-
ficial of food trade organizations, to
a seat on the defense council and
chairman of the merchants' fact-
finding group, declaring "I am con-
vinced that a majority of the food
and meat industry is just as anxious
as the consuming public to prevent
gouging of consumers." He said Kea-
sey was in position to difect inquiry
into the reasons behind rising cost
of non-price-fixed foods, that the
group's report would be valuable in
attacking the problem, but that its
report would not of itself constitute
the answer.
Episcopal Church To Hold
Confirmation Sunday
Seven University students and one
professor will be admitted to full
I membership of the Episcopal Church,
St. Andrew's Parish, at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, it was announced yesterday.
The eight who will be confirmed
with twenty-eight other young people
include Lieut. A. H. Atkinson, USN,
associate professor of Naval Science
and Tactics; Leroy S. Brooks, '44E;
Catherine E. Butman, '43Ed; Miriam
H. Chapin, '45; Carolyn R. Man-
chester, '46; Emily Ann Park, '46;
Suzanne van Dyke, Grad, and David
A. Wolaver, '46.
Democracy," "Peoples of Canada"
and "Great Lakes;" April 18, "Treas-
ure Trove of Jade" and "Western
Front."

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