100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 1942

PAGK TWO SATURDAY, OCT. 10, 1942

vacArthur Honors AP Correspondent In New Guinea

DAILY OFFICIAL B

SATURDAY, OCT. 10, 1942
VOL. LII No. 6
All notices for -the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Noties
To the Members of the University
Council: The October 12 meeting of
the University Council has been can-
celled.
Faculty, College of Engineering:
There will be a meeting of the Faculty
on Friday, October 16, at 4:15 p. m.,
in Room 348, West Engineering Buil-
ding. Routine business will be the
order of the meeting.
A. H. Lovell, Secretary
For underheated or overheated
rooms, call the Buildings and
Grounds Department, Extension 317.
Do not in any case open the windows.

Help in the war effort by conserving
fuel.
E. C. Pardon
Notice Concerning Telephone Serv-f
ice in the Residence Halls:
The switchboards in the following
buildings close at 10:30 p.m.:1
Stockwell Hall; Mosher-JordanX
Halls; Betsy Barbour lhouse;- Helen
Newberry Residence; East Quadran-X
gle; West Quadrangle; Victor C.
Vaughan House.
Karl Litzenberg
All students registered with the
Student Employment Bureau are re-
quested to bring their records up to
date by adding their Fall Term{
schedules, and also any changes ofr
address. THIS IS IMPORTANT. 1
Student Employment Bureau,
Room 2, University Hall'
Registration for jobs will be held
Monday, October 12, in Room 205
Mason Hall at 4:10 p. m. by the Uni-

JLLETIN
versity Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information. This reg-
istration comes earlier this year than
usual because the demand from em-
ployers for personnel is greater, and
we are asked to furnish candidates
now. Only, one registration will be
held, and everyone who wants em-,
ployment at the end of the February,
June, or August terh is 'urged to ap-
ply now.
This enrollment applies to teachers
and to all interested in business and
other professional positions, and is
open to seniors, graduate students
and staff members interested in full-
time work. There is Ono charge for
registration. It should be noted that
everyone who is a candidate for a
Teacher's Certificate is required by
the School of Education to be regis-
tered in the Bureau before the certifi-
cate can be granted.I
University Burea of Appointments
& Occupational Information
LAbrary Service for the Fall Term:
The schedules p-rinted below show'
some changes from those which have!
been in force in recent years. Mem-j
bers of the staff and the student
body are asked to note the hours of
the libraries in which they are par-
Lcularly interested.
Angell Hall Study Hall:
7:45 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
7:45 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30.-Fri-
day.
7:45 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Architecture Library :
8:30 a.m.-12:00; 1:30-5:00; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
8:30 a.m.-12:00; 1:30-5:00.-Friday.
8:30 a.m.-12:00.--Saturday.

CDVO Offers
Useful Home
StudyCourse
Women Will Be Trained
As Handymen By Local
Defense Office Experts
Based on the assumption that al*
though husbands may be in the Army,
Ann Arbor's homes will still have
need of handymen around the house,
the Ann Arbor division of the CDVO
has initiated a training program de-
signed to instruct women in the fine
points of fuse installation, furniture
repairing and other household arts.
The further object of the course is
to diminish calls upon over-busy ser-
vice men, thus aiding the nation by
conserving both manpower and trans-
portation.
Planned by Mrs. H. V. S. Ogden,
chairman of the CDVO training cour-
ses for this area, the course is under
the active leadership of A. K. Stevens
of the University English department.'
Experts in such practical fields as

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Gen. Douglas MarcArthur (right) in an unprecederted action somewhere in New Guinea pins the U.S.
Army's silvcr slar award on Vern Haugland, the Associated Press war correspondent, who fought his way out
of the dense New Guinea jungle after having been lost for 43.days when forced to bail out of an Army plane.
The plans ran out of fuel between Australia and Por t Moresby, New Guinea, during a storm. MacArthur
said he made the award to Haugland " ... as an outward symbol of the devotion and fortitude with which
you have done your duty." The ceremony took place in a U.S. Army hospital. This picture was radioed from
Australia to San Francisco.

1
i
l

ALTERATIONS
STOCKWELL & -MOSHER-JORDAN
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678.
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION
PIANO INSTRUCTION by dith
Koon, formerly on faculty of the
University Music School. Call
2-3354.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
MAKE MONEY-on your used cloth-
ing by phoning Claude H. Brown,
2-2736, 512 S. Main.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112.
FOR SALE
FOR FULLER BRUSHES - Phone
6835.
PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
SITUATIONS WANTED
COLORED CHEF wishes position inI
fraternity house; good buying ex-
perience; can furnish references.
Box 38.
HELP WANTED--FEMALE
STUDENT HELP WANTED. Kitchen
and dining room work. Meals and
compensation. 407 N. Ingalls.
WOMAN STUDENT, part or full
time. Prefer someone who knows
music. Apply Radio & Record, 715
N. University.
YOUNG LADY to work spare time
and all day Saturday. Must have
ready-to-wear selling experience.
Top hourly rates. Dixie Shop, 224
S. Main. 9686.
YOUNG LADY FOR PART TIME
SELLING IN LADY SPECIALTY
SHOP. APPLY IN PERSON. MAD-
EMOISELLE SHOP. 1108 S. UNI-
VERSITY.
STENOGRAPHER AND TYPIST-
PART TIME OR FULL TIME PO-.
SITION. PLEASANT SURROUND-
INGS. APPLY IN PERSON. MAD-
EMOISELLE SHOP, 1108 S. UNI-
VERSITY.

HELP WANTED
TWO STUDENTS for part-time work
-The Beer Vault, 303 N. Fifth
Ave., Phone 8200.
STUDENT HELP WANTED, part
time. Gauss Baking Company, 300
Hill St.
ROOM and BREAKFAST in ex-
change for services. Walking dis-
tance to campus. 12 Geddes Hgts.
2-2473.
HELP WANTED-MALE
WAITERS WANTED-Pretzel Bell.
BOY to help in kitchen for board.
Hours are short, work is easy. Call
2-1682.

STUDENT HELP WANTED-Kitch-
en and dining room work. Meals
and compensation. 407 N. Ingalls-
sorority.
HIGH SCHOOL or college student
for morning paper route. Apply
StudentrPublications Building, 420
Maynard.
YOUNG MAN to work in spare time
and all day Saturday. Must have
clothing selling experience. Top
hourly rates. Dixie Shop, 224 S.
Main. 9686.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Silver pen in shape of bird.
Reward. 1320 Olivia. Phone 2-2357.
LOST-K & E, Log Log Slide Rule
Wednesday in 348 or 223 W. Eng.
Reward.. Call Dams, 8751.
LOST-Yellow gold women's Gruen
with leather band. Campus vicin-
ity. Box 38, Daily. Reward.
FOUND: Brown tweed coat on Sun-
day at Kappa Alpha Theta House.
Owner, by mistake, must have
taken grey tweed coat belonging to
Marion Curtis, Mosher-Jordan.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
PERSONALS
WARREN: Please return my hat.
That Friday at the Bell. Remem-
ber? Bob Lutz, 2-4401.
WANTED-NAME OF BEAUTIFUL
BRUNET. FRESHMAN OR SOPH-
OMORE. I HAVE A DATE WITH
YOU, BUT FORGOT YOUR NAME.
Bob W. Burroughs, 409 Wenley,
2-4401. 1

Business Administration Library :
8:00 a.m.-10:00.-Monday through
Saturday.
2:00 p.m.-6:00; 7:00-10:00.-Sun-
day.
Chemistry Library:
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00.-Friday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
East Engineering Library:
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00-Friday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00-Sat-
urday.
Economics Library:
7:45 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
7:45 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30-Friday.
7:45 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Education Library :
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00.-Mon-
day through Friday.
8:00a m.-12:00.-Saturday
Graduate Reading Rooms:
9:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:30-5:30.-Mon-
day through Friday.
9:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Library Extension Service:I
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30.-Mon-]
day through Friday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Map Room:
2:00 p.m.-4:30.-Monday through
Friday.
10:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Museums Library:
1:30 p.m.-4:30.-Monday through
Friday.
9:00 a,m.-12 :00.-Saturday.
Music Library:
9:30 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:30.-Mon-
day through Friday.
9:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Observatory Library:
1:30 p.m.-4:30.-Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday.
10:00 a.m.-12:00.-Wednesday, Fri-
day, Saturday.
Physics Library:
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00; 7:00-
10:00. Monday through Thursday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00-Friday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Rackham Educational Memorial
Building Library (Detroit):
10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.-Monday
through Thursday.
10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.-Friday and
Saturday.
Science Library:
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00; 7:00-
10:00.-Monday through Thursday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00; 1:00-5:00-Friday.
8:00 a.m.-12:00.-Saturday.
Study Hall:1
7:45 a.m.-12:00; 100-5:30; 7:00-)
10:00. Monday through Saturday.
Sunday Library Service: On all
Sundays from October to June, ex-
cept during holiday periods, the Main
Reading Room and the Periodical
Room of the General Library are
kept open from 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Books from other parts of the
building which are needed for Sun-
day use will be made available in the
Main Reading Room if request is
made on Saturday of an assistant in
the reading room where the booksI
are usually shelved.
Warner G. Rice,
Michigan Dailies Wanted for Mich-
igan Students in the Services: Mrs.
Ruth B. Buchanan, Museums Library,
is making weekly mailings of the
Michigan Daily to former students
now in the armed services. These are
much appreciated by the recipients,
and Mrs. Buchanan can use more
copies of the Daily for the purpose.
Faculty members and students who

Resolution Passed
At its first meeting of the new se-
mester, the Executive Committee of
the Inter-Racial Association passed a
resolution to send a telegram to the
House of Representatives favoring
the passage of the Anti-Poll Tax Bill,
scheduled to be proposed on the floor
of the House next Tuesday.
Personal Impressions" (illustrated),
under the auspices of the Department
of Political Science, on Wednesday,
October 21, at 4:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The public is
cordially invited.
Academic Notices
Those with Commissions, USNR,
Those in Class V1, V-5, V-7, USNR:
Commencing on Wednesday, Octo-
ber 14, at 4:15 p.m., there will be a
series of lectures and instruction
drills in Naval Science at the Naval
R.O.T.C. Headquarters (North Hall)
for the benefit of students now en-
rolled in the USNR with commis-
sions, those in Glasses V-1, V-5, and
V-7. Attendance at these lectures
and instruction drills is entirely vol-'
untary but should be of value to
those interested.
R. E. Cassidy, Captain, U. S. Navy,
Professor of Naval Science and
Tactics
Navy Flight Training in Ann Arbor
sponsored by the Civilian Pilot Train-
ing Program. 16-week program is of-
fered during the Fall Term for V-1
or V-5 Navy enlistments while at-
tending University. 72 hours of eve-
ning ground school in University
classrooms. Flight training includes
35-40 hours at Ann Arbor Airport
between classes at University. No
enrollment fee. Applications are still
being accepted for a quota of 20 Uni-
versity boys. There are four open-
ings. Classes to begin as soon as quo-
ta is filled. Tentative date for start
of program has been set for October
19. For further information, call at
Room B-47 East Engineering or tele-
phone 4121, Extension 2113. Get your
application in now before it is too
late for this program.
School of Education Students-
Changes of Elections: All changes
of elections of students enrolled in
the School must be reported at the
Registrar's Office, Room 4, Univer-
sity Hall. After October 10 such
(Continued on Page 4)

United Nations
Aircraft Stage
Daylight Raids
(Continued from Page 1)
It also brought from the German
radio the threat tonight of "reprisals"
for raids "instigated by Roosevelt."
The raid moved the German High
Command to mention Flying Fortres-
ses for the first time, although this
was their fourteenth mission over
western Europe. Presumably the Ger-
mans have not been telling their peo-
ple of the activities of American
bombers for reasons of their own.
The Germans claimed 16 Allied air-,
craft were shot down including
"some" Fortresses and tried to mini-
mize the damage done as compared
to the number of planes in operation.
With elaborate advance prepara-
tion and amid fine visibility condi-
tions, squadron after squadron of
Fortresses and Liberators soared to
great heights from this and other
newly laid fields and then crossed the
channel to reduce the Lille railroad
yards to wreckage and pound with
tons of explosives the Lille Steel and
Engineering Works, one of the most
important locomotive building plants
in France.
As the bombers battled their way
out through Nazi fighters and flak
screens a pall of smoke hung over
Lille and great fires were observed.
Some of the fighter attacks were
of diversionary character. While the
American bombers were dealing their
explosives across the invasion coast,
single RAF bombers also spread their
fire to the Rhineland. '
120 Finish State Bomb
Reconnaissance Course
EAST LANSING, Oct. 9.-(/P)-Ap-
proximately 120 law enforcement, fire
and utility representatives "graduat-
ed" today from a two-day bomb re-
connaissance course at the State Po-
lice headquarters here.
The school was the second of four
_ being conducted in Michigan under
the joint sponsorship of the sixth
Army Service Command and the
Michigan Council of Defense. A sim-
ilar course will be held in Marquette
for more than 100 upper peninsula
civilian defense volunteers, the De-
fense Council announced.

Lieut. Swyler
Joins-Military
Science Staff
Instructor From Fort DixE
Replaces Maj. Houston,
Former Infantry Mead
First Lieut. E. L. L. Swyler recently
arrived from Fort McClelland, Ala.
has joined the staff of the military
science department to replace Major
K. R. R. Houston who has been trans-
ferred, it was announced yesterday
by ROTC officials.
Having spent a year and a half at
the induction center at Fort Dix,
Lieut. Swyler will assume the duties
of instructor to infantry students.
Born in Philadelphia, Lieut. Swyler is
a graduate of the rifle and heavy
weapons course at Fort Benning.
Lieut. Swyler is replacing Major
Houston who has been stationed at
the University ROTC unit for the
past two years. Before the arrival of
Col. Egger at the campus post, Major
Houston acted as the head of the in-
fantry staff.'During his stay on cam-
puts the Major was active in the mili-
tary curriculum, actively supporting
and training the provisional rifle
company. A short time before receiv-
ing his transfer orders, the major was
raised from the rank of captain.
At the time of Major Houston's
promotion, three other officers of the
staff of the military science were also'
promoted. Captain R. L. Kolb, Cap-
tain J. A. Lohla, and Captain L. W.
Peterson were promoted from the
I rank of first lieutenant.
Hillel Scholarship Given
The Hillel Hostess Scholarship for
this year has been awarded to Elise
Zeme, '44, the Foundation announced
yesterday.

appliances, furniture and general car-
pentry are called in to give house-
wives a working knowledge of these
practical aspects of home life.
The course was begun Sept. 21, de-
signed to run for 10 weeks. The en-
rollment is limited to 25, but the
course will be renewed after the first
10-week period is completed to talke
care of a waiting list of applicants.
Persons desiring to be put on the
waiting list may do so by calling local
CDVO headquarters.
According to Mr. Stevens, coordin-
ator for the course, "this program is
characterized by extreme interest on
the part of both students and teach-
ers, the latter teaching on an entirely
voluntary basis."
Four Vacancies To Be
Filled In CPT Program
Four vacancies remain to be filled
in the fall term's Civilian Pilot Train-
ing Course for those students en-
listed in Navy V-1 or V-5.
Information about the 16-week
course can be obtained by calling
Room B-47, East Engineering Build-
ing, or calling 4121, Ext. 2113.
The program consists of 72 hours
of evening ground school in Univer-
sity class rooms followed by 35 to 40
hours of flight training at the Anh
Arbor Airport. The program's quota
is 20 members, with four openings
remaining. The classes are expected
to start about Oct. 19.
IS THIS WAR
NECESSARY?
PUBLIC LECTURE BY
S. H. WYLIE
The Theosophical Society
in Ann Arbor
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Sunday at 8 P.M., Oct. 11, 1942
Admission free . . . Collection
Sunday, Oct. 18,
AFTER THE WAR, WHAT?
Sunday, Oct. 25
THE THtOSOPHICAL
SOCIETY
Time and place as above.

. I

r r

we've got classes, too
We would like to be out on campus so that
you could conviently subscribe to The Daily.
But we have to go to classes, too.
So will you just drop up to the Student
Publications Building on Maynard Street, and
come up to The Daily offices. We'll be here
to serve you.
SUBSCRIBE NOW to

Last Thimes
Today r

"Wake Island"

Shows Continuous
From 1 P.M.

dNY1RBORSNIf'fT Tr/.rF.r'

Tomorrow! Starts Sunday!
54; 4tom h eer 97, sa!:$
DIANA ROBER
rw}i 4cw

I

DIANA ROBE RT
BARRYMORE CUMMINGS
KAY FRANCIS

I

John BOLES Andy DEVINE . I

I

I I WU *

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan