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October 09, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PRIDAV, OCT. 9, 1942

r s ; ea ee-ea .a u uwr.

Survivor Given First Aid

A survivor of the U.S. Navy auxiliary vessel Calhoun, sunk by Jap
bombers early in the fighting in the Solomon Island area, is given first
aid at Guadalcanal Island, after his rescue.

Health Service
Is Kept Busy
Medical Men Get Brunt'
Of War Examinations
With the impact of the war gradu-.
ally affecting every part of campus
life, University medical men in Health
Service are beginning to feel the re-
sults of the extra load.
Taking on the examination of men
for the draft, Health Service doctors
receive a steady stream of patients
averaging between three and four
hundred a day. All draft examiners,
the doctors give the preliminary
screening exam for the draft and the
regular standard exam for the Army,
Navy, Marines, and Enlisted Reserve
Corps. All of these are through War
Board Appointments. "Although each
doctor already carries a large assign-
ment," says Dr. W. M. Brace of the
Health Service, "more are expected
as a result of the recent war rally in
Hill Auditorium."
A further addition to the medical
schedule are PEM cases excused for
physical defect or put in the correc-
tive group. Cooperating with Mr. Ross
Allen, of the physical education de-
partment, Health Service plans to
give more attention to special classes
for the modified or corrective group.
A special attempt has been made to
make all new students better suited
for military service. Registrants were
given a special blank calling attention
to defects and their cure.
Stern Ti Broadcast
Tomorrow's Game
Bill Stern, well-known radio sports
commentator, in town to broadcast
the Michigan-Iowa Naval Cadets
football game over the entire Na-
tional Broadcasting Company net-
work Saturday, has made arrange-
ments with the University to broad-
cast his regular Friday and Saturday
sports news program from Morris
Hall.
Stern's Friday show will be heard
on NBC stations at 6:45p.m. and his
Sports Newsreel of the Air will be
heard from 10 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday.
Coach Fritz Crisler will be inter-
viewed by Stern on the Saturday
show and will -tell some of the more
interesting happenings of the game.
Also included on the program will be
two dramatic incidents, Stern's res-
ume of exclusive sports news and the
University male quartet.
LEAVE GRANTED
Miss Laurie Campbell of the phys-
ical education department in the
School of Education, has been grant-
ed leave to complete her doctorate
at New York University. Her place
will be taken temporarily by Dr.
Lera B. Curtis, recently of Oberlin
College.

War Problems
To Be-Stressed
In Field Course
Problems that have been created
or intensified by the war will be em-
phasized in the School of Education's
1942-43 field course.
In cooperation with the University
Extension Service, the education
school has designed a course called
"Problems in Classroom Teaching",
which will be offered in nine evening
meetings. Topics to be discussed are
"Assisting Pupils and Teachers to
Adjust to New Conditions and Addi-.
tional Strains of the War Period",
"Motivating the Work-of Pupils in a
War Period" and "Conserving Teach-
ing Time Through the Use of Effec-
tive Techniques of Classroom Teach-
ing."
The instruction in the field course
will be given by staff members of the
School of Education in eleven Michi-
gan cities. It will carry two hours of
extension credit, provided the re-'
quirements are fully satisfied.
While the course is designed pri-
marily for those having administra-
tive, supervisory or teaching duties
in the schools, it is also open to social
workers, clergymen and officers of
parent-teacher associations.

CONTINUOUS SHOWS DAILY FROM 1 P.M.

lVou? Playingz~t!

Union Council's
Book Exchage
To Close Today
One of the most successful ex-
changes of recent years will end to-
morrow when the Student Book EX-
change closes at 5:30 p. m., having
sold approximately $1500 worth of
used books.
A non-profit organization, the Ex-
change is operated solely f.or the ben-
efit of. the students, under the chair-
manship of C. Richard Ford, '44, of
the Union Executive Council. Ford
was assisted by members of both the
Union and the League stlpdent staffs.
Next week- checks will be sent to
students whose books were sold and
postcards telling them to pick up
'books which were not sold. Books will
be returned at-the Student Offices in
the Union any afternoon from 3-5.
from Monday, Oct. 12 to Friday, Oct.
16.
Directors Will Meet
The regular fall meeting of the
Alumnus Association Board of Di-
rectors will be held here next Friday
with a luncheon at the Union '

i4AN F! ..B ('!S EWESTfiHEAfTk~r

Total Seizure
Of D enmark
Thought Likely
(Continued from Page 1)
port of Molde, a fjord below Trond-
heim where the Germans have de-
clared martial law in an effort to stop
sabotage on military projects. Many
hundreds previously were arrested.
The Nazi pressure on Denmark was
most critical.
Efforts to obtain the consent of
King Christian for the idea of a so-
called Germanic confederation of
Denmark, Norway and the Nether-
lands having failed, it was reported
in a roundabout way that Hitler has
summoned Herr Kanstein, the Gesta-
po chief for Norway, in order to make
him Reichscommissioner and impose
the full collaboration which the Nazis
demand.
Within the kingdom, Norway is
likely to be a critical day. Then a new
group of Danish Nazis is due to de-
part for the Russian front to fight for
Germany. But recently returned pup-
pet troops of this nature have been
treated with scorn by patriotic Danes,
and the new contingent may be kept
at home to help in nazification of the
kingdom.
The Copenhagen newspaper Politi-
ken has been saying that "all respons-
ible Danes are against reckless actionk
which might endanger the country."
Club Organizes
Cheer Section
Rounding out plans for Saturday's
big game with Iowa Pre-Flight Train-
ing Squadron, the Wolveries, stu-
dent pep organization under the lead-
ership of Bunny Crawford, '44, met
last night to distribute special cheer-
ing section seats for the contest.
All Wolverines who have not yet
exchanged their coupons for tickets
in the special section are urged to
see Bob Wiley, '45, from 3 to 5 p.m.
today and tomorrow until noon in the
student offices of the Union. The
seats are on the forty-yard line.
All second semester freshmen and
sophomores who are interested in
joining the Wolverines are asked to
watch The Daily for announcement
of -a membership meeting in the near
future.
Nutrition Campaign
Will BeginMonday
The role of. proper ;nutrition in the
nation's war effort, as well as -n its
peacetime pursuits, will be brought
to the attention of the citizens of Ann
Arbor and University students with
a special Nutrition Week drive during
the week of Oct. 12-17.
This drive is the outgrowth of Pres-
ident Roosevelt's action in calling the
first national conference on nutrition
ever held in this country in Washing-
ton last May.
In emphasizing the importance of
the movement, Mrs. Ruth aBush
chairman of the city committee stat-
ed, "Since this winter may find us
doing with less of the foods to which
we are accustomed, it is urgent that
we learn what we require for normal
living and what alternate foods may
be used.
Wylie Will Speak Sunday
For Theosouhical Society

U.S. F orce
Lashes Japs
In Solo mons
(Continued from Page 1)'
to mean not that a great armada was
massing there but that on frequent
occasions large numbers of enemy
vessels put in. These probably were
engaged in the work of supplying andI
reinforcing enemy troops on Guadal-
canal Island, site of the main Amer-
ican base 259 miles to the south, as'
well as on Japanese islands nearby.
On Oct. 5, the carrier task force
under general direction of Vice Ad-
miral R. L. Ghormley, Navy Chief in
the South Pacific, moved -in to the
attack, which was coordinated with
attacks on other Japanese centers in
the Southwest Pacific by heavy bomb-
ers from the Australian command of
General Douglas MacArthur.
The communique reported that
these results were observed: one crui-
ser and one transport damaged by
heavy bombs, one seaplane tender
and two cargo ships damaged by
light bombs, one cruiser and one de-
stroyer strafed in Shortland harbor.

Mad 11aE~
FOIt
~AII~Y AbREXrXt
- A a~4 f..

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Extra Added

AMERICA SINGS WITH KATE SMITH

-I

HEDDA HOPPER 4 NEWS OF THE DAY

Coming
Sunday!

DIANA
BARRtYMORE

"BETWEEN
UJS G IRLS"

di

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

MANY
which were -out of stock earlier,
have now been restocked.
Come in now! to
BOO KSTOR E

':-<fi

WANTED
ROOMMATE for girl graduate stu-
dent. Attractive room; convenient
location. 1137 E. Ann St. 8674.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION

PIANO INSTRUCTION by
Koon, formerly on facultyt
University Music School.
2-3354.

Edith
of the
Call

MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112.
FOR SALE
FOR FULLER BRUSHES - Phone
6835.
CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
HELP WANTED-FEMALE
STUDENT HELP WANTED. Kitchen
and dining room work. Meals and
compensation. 407 N. Ingalls.
GIRLS wanted for part-time work in
our receiving department. Apply in
person. GOLDMAN BROS. CLEAN-
ERS, 214 S. State St.
YOUNG LADY to work spare time
and all day Saturday. Must have
ready-to-wear selling experience.
Top hourly rates. Dixie Shop, 224
S. Main. 9686.
HELP WANTED

LOST and FOUND
LOST: Alpha Xi Delta sorority pin
with name Bette Sachs on back.
Phone 2-5579. Reward.
LOST-K & E, Log Log Slide Rule
Wednesday in 348 or 223 W. Eng.
Reward. Call Dams, 8751.
LOST-Yellow gold women's Gruen
with leather band. Campus vicin-
ity. Box 38, Daily. Reward'.
LOST-Clinton =17-jewel wrist watch,
pig-skin strap, Saturday at Sta-
dium. Reward. Call H. Scott,
2-4591.
LOST: Norma pencil. Four colors.
Initials R. K. D. Probably in vicin-
ity of 318 W. Engineering Bldg.
Call 325 Wenley. Reward.
FOUND: Brown tweed coat on Sun-
day at Kappa Alpha Theta House.
Owner, by mistake, must have
takengrey tweed coat belonging to
Marion Curtis, Mosher-Jordan.
HELP WANTED-MALE
WAITERS WANTED-Pretzel Bell.
BOY to help in kitchen for board.
Hours are short, work is easy. Call
_2- 1682.
STUDENT HELP WANTED-Kitch-
en and dining room work. Meals
and compensation. 407 N. Ingalls-
sorority.
HIGH SCHOOL or college student
for morning paper route. Apply
Student Publications Building, 420
Maynard.
MEN WANTED for part-time work in
our receiving department. Apply in
person. GOLDMANBROS.-CLEAN-
ERS, 214 S. State St.

LIBERTY MUSIC SOP
SU6GESTS
THE ALBUM Of THE MONH
VAUGHN WIMAMS
LONDO-1N SYMPHONY
(j0ooi'eni and 6L' icinnati Symptony,
Or reviewer ays -- "A superbly play-
ed and recorded version of a fausingt-
ing arge-scale jnpdern work."
11iet' -Il-916. .$7
AVE ERUM ADEREMUS TE C I1S-E
Strassbourg Cathedral Chair
Cai.umbia n -9488 ... -i.45

YOUNG MAN to workin spare time
and all day Saturday. Must have
clothing selling experience. Top
hourly rates. Dixie Shop, 224 S.
Main. 9686.

I

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