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January 14, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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AL GROUPS COOPERATE:

City Organizations PoolDrives
for Fall War Chest Campaign

Ann Arbor will pool its major
money-making drives this fall in one
giant war chest campaign, John F.
Moore, representing the Community
Fund and the city USO announced
last night.
Preliminary plans for one grand-
scale community wide campaign were
laid after the whirlwind $98,200 joint
USO-Community Fund drive last No-
vember, Moore said. Incorporated into
the new war chest will be the USO,
Community Chest, state war chest
organizations and major foreign re-
lief agencies.
Chairman of the war chest com-
mittee will be Earl H. Cress, also head
of last November's joint drive.
The new, combined drive, according
to Moore, probably will be, held in
October as a part of the nation-wide
National War Fund campaign sug-
gested. by President Roosevelt.
The, American Red Cross drive for

funds, scheduled for early Spring,
probably will not be affected by this
pooling, committee members said.
The new campaign will be pat-
terned after a report from Joseph E.
Davies of the War Relief Control
Board, suggesting time-saving reor-
ganization of social collection agen-
cies during the war emergency.
POOR LITTLE FISHIES!'
KANSAS CITY.- (,P)- Three lit-
tle goldfish, complete with bowl, were
abandoned on the doorstep of the
Red Cross women's motor corps of-
fice.
Attached was this note: "We aref
unable to care for them. Will you
please adopt them?"
The corps did.

PR/VIS
At the Michigan .
"Pacific Rendezvous," starring Lee
Bowman and Jean Rogers, is a drama
of espionage and counter-espionage
involving the efforts of the Navy to
stop the sinking of American ships
in the Pacific by Jap submarines.
Paul Cavanagh has invented a new
code that is being used in the dis-
patching of troop ships but which
is somehow allowing information to
leak out to the enemy. He is killed
when he discovers that Mona Maris
has been opening his dispatches.
Bowman, as a lieutenant in the In-j
telligence Department, gets on the
track of the enemy, with the help of
Cavanagh's niece, Jean Rogers. When
they are captured, he is forced to re-
veal the new Pacific rendezvous loca-
tion, but it all comes out right in the
end.
At the State * * -
Starting a three-day run at the
State, "Seven Sweethearts" is a ro-
mantic little story which has as its
setting a tulip festival in the town
of Little Delft, Michigan.
Covering the festival, reporter Van
Heflin takes a room in an inn run
by an eccentric old Dutchman and
his seven daughters, all of whom, ex-
cept the eldest (Marsha Hunt as
Regina), have boys' names.
Heflin is attracted to the stage-
struck Regina at first but soon real-
izes he is really in love with Kathryn
Grayson. However, it is a tradition
in the family that none of the girls
may marry until the eldest is wed,,
and he is tricked into "eloping" to
New York with Regina.
S. Z. Sakall, playing the father of
the seven girls, finally takes matters
into his own hands and straightens
the situation out to everyone's satis-
faction.

Petrillo Questioned

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

1 , --------

. ,

. ..

ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents

HAROLD LLOYD in

"THE

FRES
plus Five Shorts

Waving his upraised finger like
a seasoned hep-cat, James C. Pe-
trillo, president of the AFL musi-
cians union, clashed frequently
with Senators as he testified be-
fore the Senate Interstate Com-
merce sub-committee in Washing-
ton during a probe of the ban on
recordings by AFL musicians.
ill Says U.S. Can
Aid French Peace
Solution of the French internal
conflict between the Fighting French
.and Giraud factions in internal.
North AfricA is the task of the United
States and Great Britain, E. W. Mill
of the political science department
told the International Relations Club
last night.
The struggle is one of the rightist
and leftist factions, he said, in anal-
yzing the-question of a united France.
He pointed out that the Giraud pol-
icy of cleaning out the dissenters and
fascists before invitinm unity with
De Gaulle was one calculated to
bring permanent peace.

THURSDAY, JAN. 14, 1943
VOL. LIII No. 75
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
Classes in all schools and colleges
will be suspended on the morning of
Saturday, Jan. 23, to permit students
and faculty members to attend the
Midyear Graduation Exercises.
-Alexander . Ruthven
Midyear Graduation Exercises:
The Midyear Graduation Exercises
for all students who are candidates to
receive degrees at the end of the fall
term will be held in Hill Auditorium
at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, January 23.
The members of the faculty and of
the- graduating classes and the audi-
ence should be in their seats by 9:50
a.m. in order that the Exercises may
begin promptly as scheduled. Aca-
demic costume will be worn but there
will be no preliminary procession.
Further details will be announced
later.
Faculty Concert
Will '1 Be Tonight
Prof. Joseph Brinkman, pianist,
and Prof. Wassily Besekirsky, violin-
ist, members of the music school fac-
ulty, will present a recital at 8:30
p.m. today in the Assembly Hall of
the Rackham Building.
A featured work of this recital will/
be the Sonata in E-flat major which
was written by Eric DeLamarter now.
visiting professor at the University.
A sonata by Veracini and by Brahms
will make up the balance of the pro-
gram.
This recital is open to the general
public, but small children will not be
admitted.

Ticket Distribution - Midyear
Graduation Exercises; Hill Auditor-
ium, January 23: The admission tick-
ets for the Midyear Graduation Ex-
ercises will be ready for distribution
on January 12, 1943. Each of those
whose names appear on the list as en-
titled to receive a degree at the end
of the fall term should procure one
ticket for himself and he may also
have two others for relatives or
friends. Apply at the Information
Desk in the Business Office, Room 1,
University Hall. Please present your
identification card.
-Herbert G. Watkins,
Assistant Secretaryj
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting of
February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or summer session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the close of
business on the last day of classes
will be reported to the Cashier of the
University and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or summer session just completed will
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or sum-
mer session until payment has been
made."
-Shirley W. Smith,
Vice-President and Secretary
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Stu-
dents: All students who eventually ex-
pect to apply for entrance to a medi-
cal or dental school are requested to
register in Room 1009 Angell Hall as
soon as possibvle.
-Burton Thuma,
University Armed Forces Rep.
School of Music Assembly: By di-
rection of the Faculty, an assembly

for students and faculty of the School
of Music will be held in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre today, at 10:00 a.m.
President A. G. Ruthven will speak.
Classes in the School of Music will
be dismissed at this hour to enable
all students to attend. Students in
this School having classes at this hour
in the College of Literature. Science,
and the Arts or in the School of Edu-
cation will be excused upon applica-
tion to Dean Walter or Dean Edmon-
son. -Earl V. Moore, Director
Pre-medical students: The Medical
Aptitude Test of the Association of
American Colleges will be given at the
University of Michigan on Friday,
January 22. Any student who is plan-
ning to enter a medical school and
who has not previously taken this
test should do so at this time.
Further information may be ob-
tained in Room 4. University Hall,
and tickets should be purchased im-
mediately at the Cashier's Office.
Attention February Graduates:
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts, School of Education, School of
Music. School of Public Health-Siu-
(Continued on Page 4)
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented, Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. ". MJR"111
314 S. State St.
MICH IGAN
NOW SHOWING

Sunday, Jan. 17 7 and 9 P.M.
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Box Office Opens TICKETS - 40c
2 P.M. Sunday (including tax)

Lld

Horsepower is

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CLASSIFIErD ADVEUTISING

WAR POWER

ii

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-eq.'

CLASSIFIED
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion. for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional:
5 words.
Contract Rates on Request
ANNOUNCEMENT
SECOND SEMESTER Public Evening
School begins Monday, January 18,
at Ann Arbor High School. Busi-
ness, cooking, sewing, Americaniza-
tion, music, red cross, language,
mathematics, arts, crafts,. dramat-
ics and recreation courses offered.
A small fee will be charged for
some courses. For further infor-
mation call 5797.

MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
TYPEWRITERS-All makes bought,
rented, repaired. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St., phone 6615.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
FOR SALE
IDENTIFICATION PHOTOGRAPHS
y-Any size. For 1-day service come
to 802 Packard. 6-7:30 weekdays.
FOR SALE-Choral Union ticket for
rest of year's series. Main floor,
9th row. John Zugich, University
Hospital, Ext. 268.
HEL P WANTED
COLLEGE or high school students to
deliver Michigan Dailies. Good sal-
ary. Call 2-3241, ask for Mrs.
Mosher.
HELP WANTED-Male or female;
two meals for 2% hours, no Sun-
days or holidays; Lantern Shop,
6282.
SALESMAN for men's clothing store
to work afternoons and all day
Saturday. Permanent position. Call
at 224 S. Main or phone 9686.
WANTED: Student, male or female
for cafeteria cashier, daily from
6:30 to 8:30 a.m. Additional hours
available on week-ends. Apply Per-
sonnel Office, University Hospital.
LAUNDERING

MISCELLANEOUS

THIS THEATRE IS NOW AN
OFFICIAL. ISSUING AGENC Y
KATHRYN VAN MARSHA
GRAYSON - HEFLIN - H UNT
FRANK BORZAGE PRODUCTVIO N
Directed ky FRANK BORZAGE
COMINGHSUNDAY
ATHRYNONANDMASXPECE
-o
OCCU4"Y
COMING SUNDAY
"THE MOON AND SIX PENCE"

th ona
Carl ESMOND
Paul CAVANAGH
Blanche YURKA
Russell HICKS
Directed by Gmoge Sidney
Produced by B. F. Zeidman
MAV-

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TYPING

Producin for ictory!
Back of every tank anid plane and gun produced
in Michigan is the weapon that makes all the
rest possible . . . horsepower. And as scientists
have so aptly pointed out-horsepower is WAR
POWER.
Our nation alone has more horsepower than
the combined total of all our enemies. A single
turbo-generator, like the one shown above, pro-
duces enough electricity to supply the normal
needs of 250,000 average families. A new gen-
erator like this one will shortly be added to
Detroit Edison lines,, and most of its power will
go to producing the weapons of war. And that
generator represents less than 7 per cent of the
entire Detroit Edison capacity.
Today The Detroit Edison Company's total
generating capacity is 5 times as large as during
World War I, and more than half of this enor-
mous power is being used in war production.
During 1942, power for war production, totaled
over TWO BILLION kilowatthours. In the most
important weapon of all-POWER-we are,
well armed. Electricity must keep the war plants
humming . . . and for that vital job we are
prepared.

MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
LOST and FOUND
LOST: pair ladies amber rimmed
glasses in soft brown leather case.
Call M. Carlisle, Mich. Union.
LOST-Stainless steel wrist watch
with black band near Deke house.
Reward. Jim Herbst, phone 7217.
SHELL RIM GLASSES in leather
case. Lost Saturday between Na-
tural Science Bldg. and Stockwell.
Return to 2043 Stockwell.

r r1=11

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LAUNDRY - 2-1044.
Careful work at low

Sox darned.
price.

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
presents
PLAY PRODUCTION
in
"TAGEP DOOR"1
Comedy Hit by Geo. S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber
ONLY THREE MORE PERFORMANCES
Tonight thru Sdat., 3:30 P.M
Tickets 83c - 55c - 39e (inc. Fed. Tax)

U c BIL L SAWYER
Both
g SWEET
I AkAIFr

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