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November 29, 1942 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-29

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THE EICHIGAN DAILY

STNT)AV, NOV. 2r, ifi i

Prof. Slosson
to Talk Today

MEDICS TURN SANTA:

Ordered Scuttling

I

Annual Galens Tag Day Drive
to Raise Funds for 'ShutT -Its'
0 -- - - - - -- - - -

"Problems of Nationality in the
Post-War World" will be discussed
by Prof. Preston S. Slosson at 7:30
p.m. night in the International Cen-
ter, at the regular Sunday program.
Following the speech there will be
the usual sing and snack hour at the
Center. Everyone who pis interested is
invited to attend.
The International Centerfs Post-
War Conference will hold the first of:
a. series of panel discussions, start-
ing with an analysis of Prof. Slosson's
speech. It was announced by Robert
Johnson that the first meeting of the
group will be at 2:30 p.m. December
5, when plans will be made for future
meetings.

By MARION FORD
Junior and Senior medical students,
members of Galens, honorary medical
society, will be on hand Saturday and
Sunday with buckets for contributions
to spell "Merry Christmas" for 150
shut-in kids.
The goal for this, the fourteenth
annual Galens tag-day, has been set
at two thousand dollars-the pro-
ceeds of which will go toward amusing
the young hospital inmates during
their enforced confinement.
Headed by Karle R. Slatmyer, sen-
ior medico, the drive will last two
days, the first being devoted to cam-
pus contributions, the second taking

____

THE NAME YOU KNOW

THE STOCKING YOU LOVE.

f

place in downtown Ann Arbor to en-
able the whole town to contribute.
Proceeds from the tag sale make
possible three programs designed to
amuse and shorten the stay of young-
sters ranging from six to fourteen
years of age. These include a work-
shop where the children learn to make
their own toys under the direction of
a part-time instructor, a lending li-
brary which furnishes books, games
and films to those unable to leave
their beds and a Christmas party for
all the children in the hospital.
The Galens workshop is unique
among hospitals throughout the coun-
try, and authorities are well pleased
with the results. Originated in 1927,
the drive has become so successful
that it has become an accepted cam-
pus institution..
Maintains Workshop
A majority of the funds collected
will be used to maintain and improve
the workshop situated on the hos-
pital's top floor. Through your con-
tributions, Galens is able to furnish
a supervised occupational and recrea-
tional program where, throughout the
year, handicrafts are taught, and
where, at present, the children are
busy working on Christmas toys.
Your help in filling the pails will
keep the workshop going and will add
many books and films to the chil-
dren's library besides bringing Christ-
mas joy to hospital-ridden kiddies.
In addition to Slatmyer, five other
senior medical students are heading
the drive. These include Ralph Bit-
tinger, production chairman, Edward
Nedwicki, advance sales chairman,
and Robert Mercer, Francis Ander-
son and Eldean Betz, publicity chair-
men.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
No. 51. Mr. George Faxon will speak
on certain aspects of Church Music.
Special Note: Monday (St. Andrew's
Day) the Holy Communion will be
celebrated at 7:30 a.m. in the Harris
Hall Chapel, and at 9:00 a.m. in the
Church.
Lutheran Student Chapel: Sunday
at 11:00 a.m. Divine Service in League
Chapel. Sermon by the Rev. Alfred
Scheips on "Jesus, the Name above
Every Other Name." Sunday at 5:30
p.m. Supper meeting of Gamma Del-
ta, Lutheran Student Club, at St.
Paul's Church, W. Liberty at Third.
First Presbyterian Church: Univer-
sity Student Bible Study Class at 9:30
a.m. under the direction of Mr. Malan
and Mr. Lampe. Course of study is "A
Harmony of the Gospels." Morning
Worship-10:45, "The Future Per-
fect," subject of the Advent sermon
by Dr. W. P. Lemon. Westminster
Student Guild-Supper and fellow-
ship hour at 6:00 p.m. At 7:00 p.m.
Dr. Lemon will talk on "What Do
'Fundamentalists' Believe?"
The Ann Arbor Friends Meeting
(Quakers) will meet for worship SLUn-
day afternoon at 5 o'clock at Lane
Hall. A Sunday School for children
will be held at the same time, fol-
lowed by a business meeting. All in-
terested are cordially invited.
Unity: Sunday service at 11:00
a.m. Subject: "Spiritual U iderstand-
ing"; Young People's Discusson
Group at 8 o'clock. This will be a

ADMIRAL JEAN DE LABORDE
A Vichy broadcast said Admiral
Jean de Laborde (above) issued the.
order which resulted in the scuttling
of the French naval squadron based
at Toulon.
War Activity
Is GargTheme
Beet Picking Junket,
First-Aiders Portrayed
A Nurses' Aid on the front cover
introduces to Garg's readers its theme
of the month-campus activities in
the emergency.
From frost-nipped beet pickers in
the Sandusky fields, to bandaged first
aiders taking their 'defense with gus-
to,' the December issue of Gargoyle
will cover innovations in University
war activities. A full-page of snap-
shots taken in Sandusky shows Uni-
versity students turning farmer to
help out the Manpower Commission
and Uncle Sam. The women at home,
cartooned in a maze of first aid ban-
dages are doing their bit, too.
Garg turns also to the post-war
prospect, with speculations and pro-
phecies by prominent University pro-
fessors. Professors H. M. Dorr, of
the political science department, -Ar-
thur Smithies of the economics de-
partment and Mentor Williams of
the English department, express their
views on the economical and educa-
tional problem in the post-war world.
Cremation in Furnace
Follows Funeral Service
Funeral service for Chris, a para-
keet mascot of the Student Religious
Association, were conducted at 11:30
a.m. yesterday at Lane Hall by Wil-
liam Muehl, 43L.
The bird, pet of Clarence O. Foster,
grad., died suddenly Thursday night
after being caught in a draft.
The acting clergyman was robed in
a sheet and red velvet stole. The de-
ceased, wrapped in a silk handker-
chief, was placed upon a makeshift
altar bedecked with snapdragons,
chrysanthemums and daisies.
Preceding the ritual Jean Wester-
man, grad, sang "Tit Willow." Jack
Muelh, '43, acted as pall bearer, and
chief mourner was Constance Taber,
'44.
A solemn procession marched from
the second story, to the basement,
where the bird was cremated in the
furnace.
Thanksgiving service, preeeeded by
a 6:30 dinner, to which visitors are
invited if they make arrangements
with Marie Munro, Leader, by noon
Monday. All meetings willmbe held at
the Unity Reading Rooms, 310 S.
State, .Room 31.

Highlights
On C ... S
Carillon Series Euds
Prof. Percival Price will bring to
a close his current series of pro-
grams on the Charles Baird Caril-
lon with a recital from 7:15 to 8 p.m.
today.
Professor Price's recital will con-
sist of compositions by Schdmann,
Borodin, Mendelssohn, Debussy, four
modern works and Beethoven's
"Moonlight Sonata," all of which
were originally composed for the
piano.-
Oriental Religions
Lao Tzu, school of thought con-
flicting with Confucianism, will
be the subject of a discussion led
by Gerald Tien, teaching fellow in
Chinese, at a meeting of the Ori-
ental Religions Seminar of the
Student Religious Association at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Lane Hall.
The teachings of Confucius were
the topic for the last two weeks.
Avukah Will MVeet
Avukah, student Zionist organiza-
tion, will hold its, study group on
"The Jew in the World Scene" at
8:15 p.m. Tuesday at Hillel.
Flint-Bound
Members of the staff of the
Speech Clinic will go to Flint on
Tuesday to examine clients of the
Flint Graduate Center. These cli-
ents are children of pre-school,
grade and high school age. The
Clinic serves as consultant in
speech difficulties for this Cen-
ter, which is also a m\Jnit of the
Institute for Human Adjustment.
Record Series
Second in a series 'f record con-
certs will be held at 8 p.m. Tuesday
in the men's lounge on the second
floor of the Rackham Building.
Group DiscussionE
The International Relations Club
will discuss "The Problem of Empire
in the Post-War World' at its meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in room
231 Angell Hall.

A gift to remind her of
you every day ... with
& exquisite Lifting Fro-
grance and fragrant
Talc . . . . . .$2.00
She'll fall in love with
this new fragrance-.
Skylark... give her this
gift set with Talcum,
Soap, Lilting Fragrance
and Perfume.. $4.00
ST
F 0 R .'r s
CHi STMAS

Give her Skylark-for it keynotes the carefree happi-
ness of Christmas ... a frivolous fragrance that lends
its gaiety to three new gift sets...priced from $2 to $4.
All prices plus tax.
mademoo
SHOPS FOR WOMEN
1108SOUTH UNIVE RS ITY
Telephone 937
Open Monday and Thursday 'til 9

ma emoie e

P

Karl Marx Society will meet
4:30 p.m. today at the Union.

----

o.

at

BUY WER BONDS & STRMPS

i

P. S. Nolde Stockings are the kind I weal
and love. They're such a precious gift and so
economical. And oh Santa, how I need them)
One dollar to
One thirty-five
UTZEL'S
H Main at Liberty

Let's give 1gilt sets.
BEAUTY BAG. March right intb her heart
< with this attractive carry-all for her purse.
Comes in velvet or rayon taffeta..,
assorted colors... holds famous
Revlon "stay-on" Nail Enamel
and Oily Remover.
GOODY&R'S
STATE STREET " DOWNTOWN

--

* THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION 4

VOL. I, No. 14

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

NOVEMBER 29, 1942

tion, interviewed a record
numbe of 558 men last
week and reports that the
Army Air Corps Reserve is
one of the moct consistent
question bringers.
BUT INTEREST was
greatest in the new mete-
oroligical training course
that willy be held on cam-
pus . . . The 15-month
course is open to freshmen
and sophomores and leads
to Army Air Force meteor-
ological offices and a com-
mission . . . Trainees will
receive $50 per month plus
ration and quarters allow-
ance.
RUMOR-MONGERS la-
bored overtime late last
week as students were first
told that there would be
no Christmas vacation and
then that they would be
asked to drive Army trucks
to Alaska during the va-
cation . . . Both rumors,
which somehow seem to
contradict each other, are
entirely unfounded . . . It
was shouted over academic
back fences that the Board
of Regents and the Uni-
versity War Board had

I

I

Picked'as All-Stars by Big Ten Coaches

George Ceithaml Julius Franks

Al Wistert

placed on the coaches' first
team ... Merv Pregu7man
was picked as center on
the second mythical all-
star eleven while Tom
Kuzma was selected as one
of the halfbacks on the
second team. Madar, Pri-
tula, Kolesar and Wiese
were given honorable men-
tion.
AL WISTERT received
an added honor this week
when he was selected by
the Wailing Wall, Chicago
football fans' luncheon
club, as lineman of the
year . . . He will travel to
Chicago next week to re-
ceive his award from Rob-
ert J. "Duke" Dunn, for-
mer captain and guard of
the Wolverines in 1921.
YESTERDAY'S game
marked the end of the
football road for six Wol-
verine regulars ... Al Wis-
tert, Phil Sharpe, Bob Kol-
esar, Elmer Madar and
George Ceithaml have all
played three years for
Michigan while Rudy Sme-
ja played with 'the Wol-
verines for the last two

student drivers were to
make, the trip in nine
days, receive $100, and be
flown back in Liberator
bombers to save time . . .
The rumor was success-
fully spiked when Mary
Borman telephoned Chi-
cago . .. The Army Chief
of Staff for the Sixth Corps
area knew nothing about
it and so students put their
long underwear back in
hock.
SEVERAL HUNDRED
University students will
undergo their first black-

patrolled by ,100 University
employes while forces of
650 air raid wardens and
100 auxiliary policemen
will patrol the streets dur-
ing the 15-minute black-
out which will cover the
whole of Ann Arbor Town-
ship ... Both of Ann Ar-
bor's hospitals are pre-
pared for the test and it
will not disturb their gen-
eral procedure . . . De-
fense factories will con-
tinue their work and all
traffic will be stopped ex-
cept trucks carrying vital
wa~~r sinnlies.hbuses and

ARTnUIISCHNABEL Pianist
Thursday, December 3, 8:30 P.M.
PROGRAM
SONATA IN C MINOR . . . Schubert SONATA IN D MAJOR.. ..Mozart
SONATA IN A MINOR . . . Mozart SONATA IN B-FLAT MAJOR ... Schubert
B-f6OSTON SYMP HON'Y _____
SERGE KOUSSEVTZKY, Conductor ARTUR SCHNABEL
PROGRAM
SYMPHONY No. 88 IN G MAJOR . .,..Haydn
SYMPHONY No. 7, OP. 60.. . Shostakovich
Wednesday, December 9, 8:30 P.M.

I

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