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November 29, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE -TRRE3

T HE MtC1tM-A N- VA IY-

_C,

...
i .

Broadway Hit,
Sprig Again,'
To Play Here
Guthrie McClintic's comedy stage
hit, "Spring Again," starring Grace
George and C: Aubrey Smith in the
roles they made famous last season on
Broadway, comes to the Michigan
Theatre Wednesday evening, Dec. 2,
for a single performance direct from
its Detroit run at the Cass.
Grace George, noted star and top-
flight comedienne returned to the
field of light comedy as Nell Carter
in "Spring Again." In recent years
Miss George has starred in the somber
melodramatics of "Kind Lady" and
the involved doings of Somerset
Maugham's "The Circle" on Broad-
way.-
C. Aubrey Smith, stalwart repre-
sentative of the British Empire in
scores of Hollywood products, made
his first Broadway appearance as
Halstead Carter in "Spring Again"
in thirteen years. McClintic, who pro-
duced and staged the prize-winning
comedy, much to the surprise of the
New York theatre public, cast C. Aub-
rey Smith as an American in "Spring
Again," not just an ordinary Ameri-
can either, but the son of a fire-eating
Civil War General, who devotes his
long life to commemorating his belli-
cose parent's memory with suita e
plaques, monuments and other pu ic
effusions.
The play ran for a full season on
Broadway last year with Grace
George and C. Aubrey Smith as the
battling and beloved Halstead Carters.
happily married couple whose lengthy
marital career is nearly wrecked with
Mr. Carter's devotion to his father's
memory.

Where Battle Rages in Mediterranean
TRIESTE
FRANCE
GENOA YUGO-
WI " SLAVIA
tosPEZIA
M REt '"
ITA L Y
SPAIN ARALa
CORSICAR
................................. .....R O M E .
.
*rARANTO
SARDINIA
ISLANDS . ..-..
SP.- -
-w
ALGIERS ZRI L
-MALTA
A LGE RIA sx
TUNISIAS
T S00
STATUTE MILES LIB Y A

Another in the series of events started by the Allied invasion of
French North Africa was the seizure of Toulon, last free French city
and naval base. The French offered brief resistance while scuttling the
home fleet of 62 warships. In Tunisia the Allies were reported closing
in on Nazi defenses at Bizerte and Tunis.

EDUCATION TAKES A STEP FORWARD:

High School Victory Corps'
Plan Would Train Six Million

Cam pus Will
Join Drive to
Aid Charities
Goodfellow Campaign
Aiming at New Record,
A campus organized for war will
put aside its grim business Monday,
Dec. 14, and join forces in the 1942I
Annual Goodfellow Drive to raisei
funds for local charity organizations.s
Planned to encompass the campus,
downtown and factory areas, the,
drive will combine sales of the Good-
fellow edition of The Daily with vol- i
untary contributions in this signifi-r
cant humanitarian campaign.
The eighth drive in campus andt
city history, this year's movement9
aims to top all former campaigns by
the volume of its total returns. Fra-t
ternities and sororities, dormitories
and independent houses and the
faculty are expected to swell the
fund by selling the Goodfellow edi-
tions of The Daily and making and
soliciting voluntary contributions.'
War Agencies Help
A new factor operating to insure1
the success of the 1942 Goodfellow
Drive will be the recently organized
campus war agencies. Their role in
putting the drive across was indi-
cated by Mary Borman, director off
the Student Manpower Corps, whot
said yesterday, "Of course you can1
be sure that the Manpower Corpsi
will give the Goodfellow Drive all of
its support."t
Started by The Daily in 1935, thet
Goodfellow Drive has become tra-
ditional, its all-time high in 1936
being reached with a total of $1,675.
goal of the 1942 drive.
Cooperate
Among the campus organizations
which have cooperated in the past
have been the League, Union, Pan-
hellenic Association, Assembly, In-
terfraternity Council, the Student
Religious Association, Women's Ju-
diciary Council, Congress, and Wom-
en's Athletic Association.
Other campus organizations tak-
ing part in the campaign in previous
years have been: Senior Society,
Scroll, Mortarboard, Wyvern, Sphinx.
Michigamua, Druids, 'M' Club, Tri-
angles, Men's Judiciary Council,
Vulcans, the Engineering Council.
SPEECH CONTEST
Seventeen students, representatives
from the various Speech 31 classes,
will participate in the elimination
contest of the annual Speech 31 con-
tests at 4 p.m. Monday in Room- 4203
Angell Hall.
Members of the faculty will serve
as judges for the eliminations, from
which six students will be chosen to
appear in the final contest.

i
i

now

.:..

Louis Adamie, noted author of, such tenor
best-sellers as "'The Native's Return," Rhea
"Two Way Passage" and "Plymouth gani;
Rock and Ellis Island" will be pre- tra;
sented Monday evening as the third Van
number of the current Oratorical all c
Lecture Series. Mr. Adamic will speak 30c a
in Hill Auditorium at 8:15 and his the 1
subject will be "Tolerance Is Not ton P
Enough." Tickets will be on sale
Monday at the auditorium box offie.
Slosson Lecture: Tonight at 7:30
in the regular series of Sunday Eve-
ning Programs at the International
Center. Professor Preston Si-sson
will speak on "Some Problems of Na-
tionality in the Post War World."
This will be followed by the usual
"sing" and "snack hour." Anyone in-
terested is invited.
Academic Notices
Biological Chemistry Seminar will
meet on Monday, November 30, at
7:30 p.m., in Room 319 W. Medical
Building. "Polysaccharides. Chemistry
and Occurrence of Glycogen and
Other Polysaccharides" will be dis-
cussed. All interested are invited.
Phi Eta Sigma will conduct a review
session in Chemistry 5E, Monday, Nov.
30, Room 244 West Engineering Buil-
ding, at 7:30 p.m. This is a part of
the free tutoring service offered by
the society. Tutoring in freshman en-
gineering math and Ch. E 1 will bf-
conducted Tuesday, Dec. 1, same roon'
and time.
Concerts
University Musical Society Con-
^erts: The following concerts are'an-
nounced for the month of Decembe °
'n Hill Auditorium :
Artur Schnabel, Pianist, Thursda
December 3, 8:30 p.m.
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge

..
s

DAILY OFFICIAl
BULLETIN

Cer
{ ayd
vich
An
Han
noon
form
Eilee

(Continued from Page 2)

s vit,,ky, Conductor, Wednesday,
imber 9, 8:30 p.m., Program:
dn Symphony No. 88; Shostako-
Symphony No. 7.
nual Christmas performance of
del's "Messiah," Sunday after-
, December 13, 3:00 p.m., Per-
ers: Marjorie McClung, soprano;
n Law, soprano; Harold Haugh,
r; John Macdonald, bass; Mabel
ad, pianist; Palmer Christian, or-
st; University Symphony Orches-
University Choral Union; Hardin
Deursen, Conductor. Tickets for
oncerts on sale (Messiah concert:
nd 60c including tax) at office of
University Musical Society, Bur-
Memorial Tower.
-Charles A. Sink, President

Carillon Concert: Pr oes Per cival
Price, University Carpillonneur. con-
cludes his fall series of programs with
the playing of his recital at 7:15-8:00
this evening. It will consist of works
of Schumann, Borodin, Mendelssowli,
Debussy, four short modem composi-
tions, and will close with Beethoven's
Moonlight Sonata.
Events Today
Varsity Glee Club: Rehearsal will
start at 3:30 p.m. sharp in the Glee
Club Rooms today. Be on time.
Michigan Outing Club will go on a
hike today, leaving Hill Auditorium
(Continued on Page 4)

0 . I

,

HIM with a monogrammed
handkerchief suited to his own
taste in coloring, size and pat-
tern. Fine quality linen with
hand-rolled edges.
HER with handkerchiefs that
she'll love because they are ini-
tialed. She'll want several in
varying colors and patterns to
go with all of her best outfits.
GAGE
LINEN SHOP
10 NICKELS ARCADE
"Alvays Reasonably Priced"

The Victory Corps, proposed orga-
nisation to give high school students a1
part in the war effort and to prepare
them for their part in the armed
forces, received additional impetus
last week at a Washington, D.C. meet-
ing attended by Dr. Raleigh Schorling
of the University's education school.
Dr. Schorling was called to Wash-
ington to join a group working under
the joint direction of the War Depart-
ment and the Office of Education.
The specific task was to edit copy for
a forthcoming bulletin to implement
the Victory Corps, by which it is pro-
posed to unite six and a half million
high school students and give them a
vital part in the war effort.
The Corps, already in operation in
several thousand high schools, is de-
signed also to meet a shortage in
training for young people about to go
into the services, as revealed in a
recent survey. Latest data show that
86, perhaps 87, out of every 100 sol-
diers selected by the draft, need some
kind of technical training either in
pre - induction or post - induction
courses. The War Department insists
that in many of these training courses
from one-third to one-half of the
work could be taken care of by sec-
ondary schools, relieving valuable
army officials. The Victory Corps pro-
vides an opportunity for youth to have
a part in filling this shortage by ser-
vice appropriate to their abilities and
training.
"The military officials have gone
no farther than to point out the gap,"
states Dr. Schorling. "The schools
must meet this shortage in training.
There is no evidence that anyone in
Washington is trying to impose the
Victory Corps on high schools; it is
advocated as a wholly voluntary pro-
gram. Then, too, the responsibility of

administering the local Corps lies en-
tirely with the individual community."
The most common objection to th"
Victory Corps, that it will be a 'second
Hitler Youth,' is met by asserting
that, after all, the. community will
design its own pattern of Victory
Corps and proceed to administer it ir
its own way. The army is by no mean-
pressing military drill in schools, in
fact they are damning it by faint
praise and they are not, in any case.
going to furnish any leadership, for
such a program. Their interest is that
a physical hardening program be en-
forced to enable students to advance
more, quickly, once they get in the
army.
Guerrilla Brigade'
Is Next Cinema Film
With the purpose of aiding the
Russian War Relief Society of Ann
Arbor, the Art Cinema League wit'
present its third foreign film of thej
year, "Guerrilla Brigade" at 8:15 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday in thf
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
In addition to this picture which is
a saga of Soviet fighters behind the
enemy line, the League will also show
three shorter films. One, "Soviet Wo-
men in War" depicts the experiences
of the Russian women under fire, and
another, "Under Siege" pictures the
battle put up by the citizens and sol-
diers of Tula. The third film to be
shown will be "Front Line Hospital."
The action of these shorts will be de-
scribed by a narrator.
"Guerrilla Brigade" was photo-
graphed in July, 1939, just before the
Nazi-Soviet mutual non-aggression
pact was signed and was released sev-
eral months thereafter.

I'

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