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November 26, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIAN DAILY-

THURSDAY, NOV. 2,1942

77 -77,- 7 .-=-

....
___.._
_- - _ .,

Polish Arts
to Be Shown
Tomorrow
Polonia Society Will
Present a Program
of Slides and Music
A program designed to show some
of the contributions of Poland to
world culture will be given by the
Polonia Society from 9 to 12 p.m. to-
morrow in the International Center.
This is the first of a series of cul-
tural parties to be presented at the
Center under the auspices of the In-
ter-club board.
Slides of Poland will be. shown by
Mrs. Felicia Turyn in the first part
of the program. Mrs. Turyn, a master
of law, practiced in Warsaw and is
also known as a literary critic and
author. She came to this country in
March 1941 from German-occupied
Poland.
An all Chopin-Paderewski piano re-
cital will be the second portion of the
evening's entertainment. It is to be
given by Miss Lucille Dlugoszewski, a
seventeen-year-old compose and poet
from Detroit, who is a pre-medical
student at Wayne University. In-
cluded will be Chopin's "Mazurka in
D," "Nocturne in D Flat," "Prelude in
G," "Polonais in A Flat," and "Valse
in E Flat," and Paderewski's "Polo-
nais in B."
Polish dances by a dance group
inder the direction of Mr. Jean Jay
Jalmuzynski will complete the pro-
gram. Mr. Jalmuzynski is a dancing
master and teacher of the ballet and
a former member of Serge De Diagi-
lieff's Ballet Russe and the Anna Pay-
lova-Company. He was recently with
the Metropolitan Opera of New York
City.

Naval Base Shifts to Darlon's Control

The strategic naval base of Dakar (above) and al the rest of French West Africa has come under the
control of Admiral Jean Darlan, the former Vichy defese chief himself announced. The statement indicates
that Dakar, for two years a potential dagger pointed at the Western Hemisphere, has fallen to the Allies
without bloodshed.
. o
TheyHad Dolar-Day 'Expenditures
But Wshed he Afer-Dnnerf Dihe

By BUD BRIMMER
Three bucks for board and six bits
for weekly room rent, with a Univer-
sity estimate of the average collegian's
yearly expenses as $300. No, that
wasn't heaven, brother, it was only
Ann Arbor in 1907.
And, in that "Golden Age," the Uni-

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

MISCELLANEOUS
iDENTIFICATION PHOTOS-24-hr.
service. 802 Packard. 6-7:30 week-
days.
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
WANTED
GRADUATE STUDENT seeks warh
room in quiet house near campus,
preferably with some sort of ac-
commodation for auto. Phone 5089.
MICHIGANI
I Now Playing!I

FOR SALE

CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town: All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
WANTED TO BUY
PHONOGRAPHIC Spanish course.
Name course, price, etc., with or
without phonograph. Daily Box
102.
HELP WANTED
TWO dishwashers, Chi Omega, 1503
Washtenaw, Phone 2-3159.
TWO BOYS to wash dinner dishes.
Fine dinner as pay. Call 4089 or
6718.
WANTED, girl student to stay with
year old boy from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.
Salary plus breakfast. Call 2-4821.
LAUNDERING-
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
LOST and FOUND
THREE ladies' Shagmore coats were
exchanged at Presbyterian church
supper Nov. 5. Call 2-4466.
LOST-Liberty silk scarf, paisley, red
border-at Union November 13.
Anne Stanton, 2-4514. Reward.
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING.
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want -Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at
the Michigan Daily Business
Office, 420 Maynard Street.

versity's official bulletin of general
information not only quoted these
figures, but emphasized that the $300
one included clothing and incidentals
books, lab fees and a $10 matricula-
tion fee, to boot.
But, as Mrs. Camilla B. Green, the
former assistant secretary of the en-
gineering college who retired last
month after 35 years of. service, read-
ily admitted when she revealed the
foregoing statistics, those days are
gone forever.
Metamorphosis Under Way
As a matter of fact, by 1912, the
metamorphosis of annual expenses
has gotten under way. Then another
100 bucks had attached themselves
to the average collegian's annual ex-
pense account, while the student had
to shell out four bucks for his 21-meal
week.
Mrs. Green, in recounting her mem-
ories of the collegian's expenses dur-
ing heryears, ofassociation with the
University, mentioned that in World
War I years-1917-1918 to be exact--
the average annual expense was over
$500. It was then that the engineer
was paying $49 tuition if he came
from Michigan, and $89 if he claimed
some other state as home. The lit
man's tuition was $44 and $64 for
state and out-state students respec-
tively.
No Dormitories Then
Board and lodging in 1918 were esti-
mated at eight silver dollars per week,
and since there were no dormitories
or commons, the student's eating and
sleeping problem was solved by room
and board with Ann Arbor's private
families.
The town, of course, wasn't exempt
from the 1929 boom times, Mrs. Green
recounts. By then the University's
official calculations for the Michigan
student's annual expenses, not includ-
ing clothing and railroad fares to and
from here at vacation time, totalled
$818.
Non - resident students' expenses
were estimated exactly 40 dollars
higher. And, $3,000 for four years
of college was then considered a pret-
ty liberal estimate of the "squeeze"
to be put on the folks back home.
However, things have since been
Soviets Seize
Don Junction
in Offensive
(Continued from Page 1)
dead and 51,000 captives. In addition
the Russian said they now have cap-
tured 1,300 guns of all calibers, 5,518
trucks, 62 ammunition dumps and
vast quantities of equipment and food.
Inside Stalingrad, the regular mid-
night communique reported, Russian
troops had cleared the Germans from

modernized, for today such fees as
the matriculation fee which entitled
students to the privilege of permanent
membership to the University, the
diploma fees, and fees for special cer-
tificates had been abolished. Of
course, in the engineers' plight the
$120 fee for an out-stater and the
$65 for a resident student absorbs
these extras.
In the case of board, there's a cur-
rent rumor that the official estimate
is -about six of the long green with
"One" mark. However, the so called
informed students usually subtract a
unit or so from this figure and in the
case of room rent tliey tell:us that it's
anywhere from $2.50 to $5.
And, the estimated average expense
for the engineer is supposedly around
$600. But, then again as some obscure

Grocery Chain
to Be Probed
as Monopoly
Government Charges
A&P with Food Plot
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.-P)-Th
government accused the nation
largest food chain today of drivir,
competition out of business throug
systematic domination of local area
and drew a reply that every char
would be disproved.
The charges were made in a tw
count indictment voted by a Feder
grand jury at Dallas, Tex., against1
companies in the Great Atlantic an
Pacific Tea Company group; 16 off
cials in that group; Business Organ
zation, Inc., and its president, Ca
Byoir of New York, public relatio
representative of the chain.
The prime corporate defendant w
the New York Great Atlantic and P
cific Tea Company, Inc., parent of ti
11 other companies.
The individuals indicted imclud
George L. Hartford of Montclair, N.
and John A. Hartford of Westchest
County, N.Y., president and first vic
president respectively of the top com
pany.
The indictment was announcedi
Washington, where the investigatio
had been directed. by the Justice D
partment's anti-trust division.
The charge was made that the e
fect of the alleged conspiracy wast
"injure and destroy food manufa
turers, processors, canners, whol
salers and thousands of independe:
retail food dealers; to depress pric
paid to growers of fresh fruits, veg
tables and other farm crops; and
make, it impossible for thousan
non - integrated independents a
small chains to remain in compet
tion with tie defendants."
Also in Washington, Carl Byoir
Associates replied for the A&P gro
that the anti-trust division "is no
J attempting to create further cha
by an attack upon the methodsc
doing business which have won t
greatest approval from consume
farmers, labor and the great mass
our people."
Defense Course
Graduates HWorl
On Many Jobs
Michigan engineers, like the we
known paint, have long been kno
to "cover the earth," but Prof. R.E
Sherlock, coordinator of the ESMW
program reports that even graduat
of the University's 10-week war-trai
ing courses are seeing their share
the world.,
Professor Sherlock recently receiv
information that two hardy wom
graduates of Prof. Edward Youn
surveying, topographic mapping a
photogrammetry course are now e
gaged in stereographic mapping
the world's deepest gorge, the Gra
Canyon of the Snake River in Was
ington's Wallowa Mountains.
Employed by the army enginee
corps, Miss Mildred Butler and M:
Margaret Steeve, both of whom fi
ished their training here Oct. 1, a
now charting this chasm from stere
scopic photographs made from ai
planes.

'e
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Swollen Purses,
Tuthey Scarcity
Mark Holiday
Traditional'Pixins' Out
Because of Shortages
By The Associated Press
America observes its first wartime
Thanksgiving in 25 years today with
swollen pocketbooks and shrinking
larders.
For the first time in years, many.
with the money to buy were unable to
get the traditional turkey and some of
the "fixin's" because of local shortages
due to the war emergency.
Flush with war funds, millions
crowded food stores throughout the
country in a last minute rush to stock
up for the holiday. Agriculture offi-
cials reported that never before had
there been such a demand for food.
But because of Lend-Lease require-
ments and the need for su plying
hundreds of thousands of troops over-
seas, there were shortages of meats,
poultry, dairy products, eggs and some
vegetables.
Missing from many tables will be
the after dinner coffee (sales were
halted last week as a. prelude to ra-
tioning) .andl the piece de resistance
of some pumpkin pie eaters-whipped
cream.
The war production board issued an
order yesterday halting sales of whip-
ping cream in order to conserve fluid
milk.
MVIE
- I
At the State
Using dimmed-out Manhattan as a
background, 20th Century-Fox's "Girl
Trouble" opens today at the State
Theatre. The film stars Don Ameche
and Joan Bennett with Frank Craven
and, Billie Burke in the supporting
roles.
The story involves the troubles of
Miss .Bennett who has, just lost her
income and finds that she must reit
out her apartment. Don Ameche is
cast as a rich.South American coffee
and rubber planter. who. sub-lets the
apartment and takes Miss Bennett as
his maid.
The situation gets all tied up in
double crosses which are overheard by
the right people at the. wrong time,
but everything works out well despite,
the snarled plot. Ameche finds out
'that Miss Bennett isn't really a maid,
but a poor little rich girl .and winds
the film up in..the traditional manner
of love and kisses.

T oday's News
On Campus.
Forum to Be Held
A discussion on "Chinese Philoso-
phy-Influence of Ways of Thought
on Action" will be led by Miss Sui-chi
Huang at the meeting of the "China
Today" Forum at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Room 302 of the Union.
This group was organized by the
students of the classes in the Chinese
language and Chinese literature to
introduce American students to the
culture, history, and politics of China.
Nursing Courses Offered
Desiring to cooperate with a gov-
ernment request that at least one
person in every home be trained for
home nursing, the local Red Cross
office is now offering courses in nurs-
ing.
The classes are spread over a 12-
week period with one hour of instruc-
tion a week. Afternoon and evening
classes will be formed according to
the demand expressed in future regis-
trations.
Postal Help Needed
An appeal was issued by the Ann
Arbor post office yesterday for a large
number of helpers to handle the
usual, Chrishnas deluge of mail.
Postmaster Earl Knight especially
pointed out to University students
that no recommendations or special
qualifications are required. He urged
that all persons interested in a job
register immediately at the post of-
fice.
* *
Accounting Sessions Held
At the recent session of the Detroit
Comptrollers Group held at the Mich-
igan Union Professors William Paton
and E. H. Gault took an active part.
Professor Paton was toastmaster for
the dinner which preceded the eve-
ning meeting, and Professor Gault
spoke to the afternoon session on bus-
iness principles.
35 Engineers from Chile
1o Take Training Here
Chile will be well represented in the
University next semester when 35
engineers, the entire graduating class
of the engineering school at Santiago,
will enroll here for advanced training
in various fields.
ETA KAPPA NU INITATES
Eta Kappa Nu, junior and senior
electrical engineering honorary soci-
ety has announced the initiation of
thie following: John M. Norton, '43E,
Melvin Fronties, '43E, Thomas F. In-
man, '43E, Richard C. Drutowski,
'43E, George M. Snow, '44E, Lee C.
Verduin, '43E, and Roger K. Higgins,
'43E.

sage once remarked, "Times
change."

will

Union Offers
New Course
Registration is still open in the new
leadership course being offered by the
Michigan Union, it was announced
yesterday by Art Leib, '44E, chairman
in charge.
Stressing the fundamentals of war-
time and post-war leadership, this
program will begin on Thursday, Dec.
3 and will run for five consecutive
weeks.
Dr. Norman Maier of the Psychol-
ogy department will direct all sessions
in the series.
Each session will be conducted in
laboratory style giving each partici-
pait an opportunity to participate
actively, Geib stated.
The program is open to both men
and women enrolled in the University.
Men may register any afternoon from
3 to 5 p.m. in the Student Offices of
the Union. Registration of women is
being taken in the Social Director's
Office in the League.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

.. . .

I

$ with PAT
O BRIEN
GEORGE
MURPHY
JANE WYATT . JACKIE COOPER
CARL ESMOND . MAX BAER
--ALSO -
Pete Smith's
"LISTEN BOYS"
"BLITZ WOLF"
COLOR CARTOON
"FAMOUS BONERS"

War Bonds Issued
While You Wait!
Continuous from 1 P.M.
WP7~~ANNARBKORA!'fW'F YFA7fF
---,

THURSDAY, NOV. 26, 1942 1
VOL. LIII No. 46
All notices for the Daily official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form, by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
Selective Service Questionnaire: If
you expect a notary public to sign and
seal your Selective Service Question-
naire, please do not sign the document
except in the presence of that offi-
cial, who must by law actually see you
attach your signature to any legal

TODAY
WHAT

r, Adults
" 40c All Day
T,
When Don's valet
turns out to be..
Joan! It's a comedy
of terrors-for Don!

an
g's
nd
,n-
of
ndr
h-
ars
iss
re
.o-. .
r-
Sabtge Sata
This year more than ever it is necessary
that we shop early.. Transportation and
postal facilities Will be strained to the ut-
m0.st. Shop early and mail early to be sure
your gifts get to their destination.
Cl I\fl~ ~AfI \/

ONE NIGHT ONLY
Wed., December 2nd
(Curtain at 8:15 Sharp)

GUTHRIE McCLINTIC presents
THE 1942 PRZ-WINNING
COMEDY HIT
16 }..~ "k"\

several gun emplacements and strong document.
points, killing 300 Nazis in one sector -Herbert G. Watkins
and putting out of action some enemy Assistant Secretary
artillery and mortar batteries.
The Red Stalingrad garrison now Enlisted Reserves:.It has come to
is fighting with the aid of a Russian my attention that some students who
column that was reported yesterday have enlisted in one of the enlisted
to have driven southward along the reserve programs have failed to return
Volga to join Soviet units in the their draft questionnaire on the as-
northern factory district. (Continued on Page 4)
MICHIGAN WOLVERINE
209 SOUTH STATE
SPECIAL THANKSGIVING DINNER
SERVING HOURS FROM 12:15 to 2:00 O'clock
(Guests Invited) Price $1.00

. I

gaN
toV
F
G r ...
f

,Ai1]

2o*.

with BILLIE BURKE . FRANK
CRAVEN . ALAN DINEHART
Directed by Harold Schuster
Produced by Robert Bassler

i ,_

AlI-,n _ __ _

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