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November 24, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PP

PAGE TWO'
Technic Goes
on Sale Here
Issue Out Tomorrow
Will Feature Contest

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOV. 24, 1942

IMMIGRANT SEEKS MELTING POT:
Author Louis Adamic to Speak
as Third Oratorical Lecturer

l #Ueigan Iten at Wap

ASME Will See Arc Welding Tomorrow

A 15-cent investment will reward
some engineer with five dollars when
the ethics question featured in the
November Michigan Technic is. an-
swered after the magazine goes on
sale tomorrow in the lobby of the
East Engineering Building above the
arch.,
Held up by printing difficulties
and delays with cuts, the new Tech-
nic will appear featuring for the first
time a contest on an ethics question.
The solutions to the problem must
be submitted to a special committee
chairmanned by Prof. Donald L. Katz.
First scheduled to be released two
weeks ago Monday, the Technic will
include an article by Blaine Newman
on "Polaroid." Also featured are
articles on "Acid Control of Oil
Flow," "Cooperation- Production-
Aircraft," and "Theory of Limit De-
sign," written by John G. Standt,
'31E, Jack T. Gray, '39F, and Robert
Kay, '43E.

Louis Adamic, author of "The Na-
tive's Return" and "My America"
and at present Consultant for the
Defense Commission in Washington
as an expert on new-immigrant and
related matters, will speak here Mon-
day in the third Oratorical Associa-
tion lecture.
Adamic is now engaged in writing
a series of five books, the aim of
which is to end the "psychological
war" in America. The first of these,
"From Many Lands," won the $1,000
Anisfield Prize for 1940 and the sec-
ond has just been published under
the title "Plymouth Rock and Ellis
Island."
Believing that many of us, espe-
cially some of those whose families
I have known for two centuries or
more the privileges of citizenship in
this country, have forgotten the
American dream, he wants to re-
awaken in us the same sense of de-
mocracy which guided the first pion-
eers.
The basis of what Adamic has
termed America's "psychological
war," which he says was going on
long before Nazism became a threat

to this country, is simply that the
"melting pot" isn't doing enough
melting.
"Today," he says, "the melting pot
is used to fry the good out of a lot
of people in it. The possession of the
name Starziniski instead of Hamilton
and an inherited taste for pigs'
knuckles rather than prime ribs of
beef, is a source of a feeling of in-
feriority that millions suffer," he
states.
He believes, and points out in his
books, that America's social and ra-
cial tensions must be eased if Amer-
ica's defense effort is to be total.
Now is the time, he believes, to make
the best of this opportunity to weld
together all groups and all races
and to create a new national solid-
arity.
To obtain material for his five-
book series, he and his assistants have
traveled over 100,000 miles, distrib-
uted 250,000 questionnaires and writ-
ten about 20,000 letters. His thesis
is simply this-that the concept of
Americanism be broadened to in-
clude the non-Anglo-Saxon Ameri-
cans who comprise roughly one-third
of the nation and who have contrib-
uted so much to the development of
this nation.
To aid him in collecting data on
the contributions to American life of
various racial and foreign groups,
especiallysthose that have comehhere
in the past 100 years, he now has a
staff of workers traveling over the
entire country. The material which
they uncover he uses in his books
and in the magazine "Common
Ground," which he edits and which
is published by the Common Coun-
cil for American Unity.
Adamic believes, and in his dis-
cussion here will show, how the pres-
ent crisis can be turned to solidifying
and uniting this country rather than
dividing and breaking it up as the
Nazi propagandists have boasted that
it would.

Paul E. Hoeper, who enlisted in the
Afmy at Ann Arbor last May, has
recently been promoted to the rank
of First Lieutenant in the Army Air
Force. Lieut. Hoeper was a student
at the University for three years. HeI
is a member of Alpha Tau Omega
fraternity and Mimes, honorary dra-
matic club for men.
Another Michigan man now serv-
ing in the commissioned ranks of
the Army Air Corps is Lieut. Wil-
lard M. Freehling, stationed at the
Army Air Base in Walla Walla,
Wash. Lieutenant Freehling, who
spent three years at the University
and was a member of Zeta Beta
Tau, serves as rail transportation
and base salvage officer.
* * *
Now attending the U.S. Offictr
Candidate Infantry School at Fort
Benning, Ga., is Candidate Clark V.
Whitehead, who graduated from the
University in 1937. While attending
the University he served for four
years as assistant director of Physi-
cal Education. He won the all-around
gymnastic championship of the Uni-
versity and is past chairman of the
area A.A.U. Gymnastic Committee.
Candidate Whitehead expects to
graduate from the school this No-
vember.

Edward K. Swain of Willoughby,
Ohio, has recently joined the At-
lantic Division of Pan-American
Airways as a junior pilot and is
now completing his aviation train-
ing before being checked out on
the giant ocean-flying clippers.
Swain, who was a student at the
University from 1934 to 1938, took
a government-sponsored civilian
pilot training course before enroll-
ing in the school.
Also serving at the Pecos Army
Flying School, Capt. Donald H. Ford
was recently appointed Judge Advo-
cate. He graduated from Oregon
State College and received his law
degree from Michigan. Captain Ford
is a member of the California Bar
Association.
Royal A. Buehler of Detroit re-
cently received his "Navy Wings of
Gold" and was commissioned an
ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve
at the Naval Air Training Center
in Corpus Christi, Tex. Ensign
Buehler, who volunteered for flight
training in August, 1941, is a for-
mer student of the University Law
School. He is a mnember of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon fraternity.

An educational feature, "The In-
side of Arc Welding" will be shownl
7:30 p.m. tomorrow in 318 Union toI
the student branch of American So-
ciety, of Mechanical Engineers.
This 60-minute sound picture illus-
trates by full color animated charts

and drawings what actually happens
inside the arc and molten pool. De-
signed to show the correct procedure
for welding and how bad welds are
made this open meeting is of spe-
cial interest to all engineers enrolled
in welding courses.

WAR BONDS ISSUED HER
Week Days 25c to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW PLAYING!

Day or Night

AHAABOR:S *'E'ST TEATA'1

WARNER BROS: BIG NEW HIT!
withGENE LOCKHART-ROSCPE KARNS-EDWARD CIANNELLI
Directed GRAHAM Screen Play by Fred Nibio, Jr. and Hector
by JO Chevigny . From a Story by Roy Chanslor

Extra Added

TI TO'S
GUITAR

RAY McKINLEY
ORCHESTRA

WINTER
SPORTS

ii

WORLD
NEWS

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Coming
Thursday!

DON AMECHE - JOAN BENNETT
"GIRL TROUBLE"

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES

HELP WANTED
TWO dishwashers, Chi Omega, 1503
Washtenaw, Phone 2-3159.
TWO BOYS to wash dinner dishes.
Fine dinner as pay. Call 4089 or
5718.

Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at
the Michigan Daily Business
Office, 420 Maynard Street.
FOR SALE

WA NTED TO BUY

PHONOGRAPHIC Spanish course:
Name course, price, etc., with or
without phonograph. Daily Box
102.

MISCELLANEOUS

CHRONOGRAPH, one year old,
reasonable price--Call at noon
six-2-2551.

at
or

IDENTIFICATION PHOTOS-24-hr.
service. 802 Packard. 6-7:30 week-
days.
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
A GIRL STUDENT wishes a ride to
Grand Rapids or Muskegon Novem-
ber 27. Will help pay expenses.
Phone 2-6159.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful- work at low price.
ALTERATIONS
STOCKWELL & MOSHER-JORDAN
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678.

CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
BACK NUMBERS Life, Geographic,
Time, in order of publication! Jr.
Aircraft kits and supplies! Open
daily 4 and 7 p.m. 519 W. Cross,
Ypsilanti.

u
T HE TAVER N
338 MAYNARD STREET T
extends to all
its Best Wishes for a
MERRY CHRISTMRS 0
AND A
HAPPY NEW YEAqR U
o = o o<; >o<== 3>+UG o= o t>.:Jo t 0
MICHIGAN HON
SHOWING

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
TUESDAY, NOV. 24, 1942
VOL. LIII No. 44
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
Will all members of the staff trav-
eling on University business please
notify all ticket agents that the tick-
et to be purchased is exempt from
the tax imposed by the Revenue Act'
of 1941. Do not wait until the tick-
et has been stamped before giving
this information as it then neces-
sitates the invalidating of the first
ticket. This notice grows out of the
large proportion of cases where, in
the past, time and a ticket form
have been wasted by not specifying
in the first place that the ticket
wanted is to be tax exempt.
Shirley W. Smith
Naval Reserve Classes V-1 and
V-7: The height-weight requirements
for enlistment in' Classes V-i (S),
V-1 (G) and V-7 (S), V-7 (Q) have
recently been modified. It is sug-
gested that all those who have been
rejected, because of failure to meet
the minimum or maximum weight re-
quirements, apply again for enlist-
ment. The new age-height-weight
standards are on file in 1009 Angell
Hall.
B. D. Thuma
Preforestry Students: A meeting
for all preforestry students will be
held at the Michigan Union tonight,
7:00-8:00. Prof.-William Kynoch will
explain briefly some of the wartime
work of foresters in the wood prod-
ucts industries and several other
members of the faculty of the School
of Forestry and Conservation will be
present to meet the students and to
answer questions. Adjournment will
be prompt.
- S. T. Dana, Dean
College of Architecture and Design,
School of Education, School of For-
estry and Conservation, School of
Music, and School of Public Health:
Midsemester reports indicating stu-
dents enrolled in these units doing
unsatisfactory work inany unit of
the University are due in the office
of the school on Saturday, Nov. 28,
at noon. Report blanks for this pur-
pose may be secured from the office
of the school or from Room 4, Uni-
versity Hall.
Robert L. Williams,
Assistant Registrar
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts:
Midsemester reports Are due not
later than Saturday, November 28.
Report cards are being distributed
to all departmental offices. Green
cards are being provided for fresh-
men reports; they should be re-
turned to the office of the Academic

eD
.-41 1. ,. -W
WAHR' S
BOOKS Are Ideal Qifts!
A Few Best Sellers Are Listed Below:
THE ROBE SEE HERE, PRIVATE HARGROVE
b Lloyd C. Douglas by Marion Hargrove
SONG OF BERNADETTE SUEZ TO SINGAPORE
by Franz Werfel by Cecil Brown
THE PRODIGAL WOMEN LAST TRAIN FROM BERLIN
by Nancy Hale by Howard Smith
DRIVIN' WOMAN LEE'S LIEUTENANTS
by Elizabeth Chevalier by Douglas Souhalt lreen'tan
THE VALLEY OF DECISION VAN LOON'S LIVES
by Marcia Davenport by Hendrick Willen van Loon
THE CUP AND THE SWORD THE COMING BATTLE OF GERMANY
by Alice Tisdale Hobart by William B. Ziff
THE SEVENTH CROSS I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER
by Anna Seghers by Andre Maurois
LOOK TO THE MOUNTAIN WASHINGTON IS LIKE THAT
by LeGrand Cannon by W. M. Kiplinger
GENTLEMAN RANKER STORM OVER THE LAND
by John Jennings by Carl Sadburg
THE UNINVITED = GET THEE BEHIND ME I
by Dorothy Macardle by Hartzell Spence
THE DAY MUST DAWN _ TEXAS: A WORLD IN ITSELF
by Agnes Trnbu by George Sessions Perry
THE HORN OF LIFE PAST IMPERFECT
by Gertrude Atherton by Ilka Chase
MICHIGAN SONG BoOK LEATHER BILL FOLDS, WALLETS
and ZIPPER CASES
DOOKREN"D
MUSICAL POWDER BOXES STATIONERY by CRANE,
MUSICAL CIGARETTE CASES MONTAG, and EATON
MICHIGAN JEWELRY and many other items

4 J. ANE WYATTI ° IACIEtCOOPERittand ICARL ESMOKI'U MAX BAR K

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