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November 20, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-20

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0.

PAGE Two

THE MICHIGANDAILY

FRIDAY, NOV. 20- 21942 -

PAOE WO FIDAY NOV

SOME PETROL, PROFESSOR:
Prof. Gram to Aid University
Employes in GettingExtra Gas

If it's gas you're interested in-and
who won't be concerned about it soon
-then Prof. Lewis Gram is your man.
Hokvever, the Professor and his two
fellow committeemen can only help
you get extra gasoline allotments if
you're one of the University's em-
ployes and can prove that you've got
to have the fuel for essential driving
to and from work.
Reason for this is that Professor
Gram heads the University's plant
advisory committee on gasoline ra-
tioning and all applications for B or C
allotments to University employes
must first be certified by this three-
man board before the local ration
office can take action. Teacher, main-
tenance man, hospital workers, or
men and women connected with the
athletic associations or dormitories-
all must have their requests certified
by Professor Gram and the commit-
tee.
But, even if you do endorse a Uni-1
versity check every month or so, and
are listed on the employee roles,
they're going to ask you a lot of ques-

tions. Maybe in some cases they'll ask{
a man to forego peacetime customs
such as driving home to lunch at noon
time-all in an effort to conserve the
nation's vital rubber supply. This ad-
visory plant committee is similar to
many others which have ben estab-
lished all over the nation in every
plant employing more than 50 men.
In order to determine an employe's
eligibility for extra rations the com-
mittee will ask the principal occupa-
tion of the main user of the vehicle,
by whom that person is employed and
in what industry. Questions will also
be made concerning the miles driven
by the user in going to and from work
during the last month, and each ap-
plicant will be required to estimate
how many miles he intends to drive
during the next three months. All
these must be answered before cer-
tification can be made.
But, the main "hitch" in consider-
ing applications will come from the
requirement that each applicant for
a B or C ration book share his ride
with at least three other people.

Allies' African Successes Rrnise Fears of Counter-Move
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Success of American, Britishr and sympathetic French forces in two African war areas have led to fears
Igaini that Ad'olf Hitler might try drastic counter-moves to outflank the Allies. One such move might be
through Spain (1) and that nation's; sudden mome to bolster its armies .le~d to-belief it was preparing to resist
any such aggression. Nazi movements in Balkans re vived menage of drive (2) through Near East. The
British Eighth Army pu hed to within '70 miles of Deng asi (3) : American forces and British First Army drove
into Tunisia (4) where Axis forces were bracing to hold Tunis aid' Bizerte and control the narrow strait off
Sicily. Parachutists were dropped in southern Tunisia, with Tripoli as their objective.

.dol eof Coeds$
i War is Topic
of Conference
A conference entitled "College Wo-
men and the War" was held'last week
at Northwestern University to dis-
cuss and formulate training programs
which will effectively fit college wo-
men in the nation's war effort.
The Universitywas represented by
Dean Alice Lloyd, President of the
National Association of Deans of Wo-
men, Dr. Margaret Tracy of the Bus-
iness Administration School and Pro-
fessor A. E. R. Boak, member of the
curriculum committee of the literary
college.
Women Urged, to Join Up
Stressed at the meeting was the
importance of encouraging college
women to enter into the armed ser-
vices. Representatives of both the
WAVEs and the WAACs emphasized
the fact that a college training is
highly desirable in future officers.
Dean Lloyd urged coeds to take an
active interest in social service work,
teaching, and nutrition work. "It is
true that college women are being
urged to elect mathematics and sci-
entific courses but there is a, very!
great demand for college trained wo-
men in a wide variety of other fields.
The war has provided college women
with unprecedented opportunities to
succeed in their fields.
"In many instances, college women
will have to sacrifice their long term
plans temporarily in order that they
might better serve in the war effdrt.
Health and stability are most essen-
tial in filling any war-time positions,"
Dean Lloyd concluded.
Graduates Are Outstanding
Over 110 colleges and universities
took part in the conference; accord-
ing to reports of two representatives,
college graduates who have already
entered into national industry have
distinguished themselves with their
ability and service.
The immediate need for all college
students is a modification of their.
curricula so that each individual is
studying some field which is essential
in the war effort.
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE

Health Officers
toInspect Here
Latin-AAmericans to
Tour Sanitary Plants
Engineers from the health depart-
ments of 14 Latin American nations
will visit the University Sunday and
Monday as part of a nation-wide
study of public health practices.
Sanitary engineers Julie Jauregui
of Bolivia and Carlos Guardia of
Panama graduated from the Univer-
sity in 1933.
The nation-wide tour is conducted
by the Pan-American Sanitary Insti-
tute, a coordinator of health prac-
tice between the United States and
South America. The health officials,
now in Battle Creek studying rural
health facilities at the Kellogg Foun-
dation, will arrive here Saturday.
Their Ann Arbor tour will consist
of visits to the local sewage disposal
and water purification plants and the
new School of Public Health Build-
ing.
Representatives from the following
countries will be here: Chile, Guate-
mala, Honduras, Peru, Uruguay, Hai-
ti, Mexico, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ec-
uador, Dominican Republic and Bra-
zil. W N. Dashiell of the.Pan=Amner-
ican Sanitary Bureau will accompany
the delegates.

" .

;

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

J

FACES FROM HOME:
High School Principals Question
Freshmen on University Life

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES

i

Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (Iin-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assistyou in
composing your ad. Stop 'at
the Michigan Daily Business
Office, 420 Maynard Street.
- FOR SALE
FOR FULLER BRUSHES - Phone
6835-Dealers wanted part time.
PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Fraternity pin, Sigma Phi
Epsilon. Finder please call John
Mikulich, 2-3189. Reward.
LARGE zipper notebook and 4 text-
books-Calculus, English, Trigo-
nometry, German.-Contact Lea-
trice Amer-7672-Reward.
WILL TRADE one Harry Suffrin
camel hair overcoat for one Hart,
Schaffner & Marx camel hair over-
coat exchanged by error one week
ago. Call Jeff Solomon, 8518, 2108
Melrose.
MISCELLANEOUS
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.

In an attempt to better prepare
secondary school students for en-j
trance into the University, princi-
pals of eighty-four Michigan, Illi-
nois, Indiana and Ohio high schools
spent yesterday morning in the
Rackhan Building interviewing grad-
uates of their institutions who are
now University freshmen.
Questioning their former students
about scholastic and environnental
difficulties encountered in their first
semester at the University, the prin-
cipals discussed everything from
study habits to Ann Arbor housing
conditions.
The war's effect on high school

education was the subject of the
afternoon's panel discussion held in
they Hussey Room of the League. Led
by Professor Harold M. Dorr of the
political science department, the ford
um debated the lowering of Univer-
sity entrance requirements in order
to provide more young people with
war training, changes in high school
curricula, and efforts by secondary
schools to iiduce students to con-
tinue their education.
President Alexander G. Ruthven
welcomed the delegates to the 16th
annual conference at a luncheon in
the League Ballroom.

i

Reli gous Hea
Will Address
Youth Groups
Dr. George F. Thomas, Professor
of Religious Thought at Princeton
University, is being brought to Ann
Arbor by the Student Religious As-
sociation to lead the annual fall In-
ter-Guild Conference on the topic
"What Makes Christianity Distinc-
tive?" Saturday and Sunday at Lane
Hall.
Highlight of the conference will
be Dr. Thomas's address at 7:45 p.m.
Saturday, to which the entire campus
is invited, followed by discussion.
Federation of Groups
Because the topic, which is a di-
rect outgrowth of the problems of
Guild members, is considered of un-
usual importance, the conference
will be open tohall students for the
first time in the history of Inter-
Guild, a federation of youth groups
of several Protestant churches.
The conference, which will open
at 1 p.m. Saturday in the lobby of
Lane Hall, will include tea at 3 p.m.,
an address at 4 p.m., and dinner at
6:45 p.m. Saturday, followed by the
address and discussion.

Sh ortage

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Continuous Daily
from 1 P.M.

There's No,
Peaint

BAC:
Tin
Ai
da:
Yp

K NUMBERS Life, Geographic, HELP WANTED
me, in order of publication! Jr. - -- -
rcraft kits and supplies! Open PART-TIME student help, noons and
ily 4 and 7 p.m. 519 W. Cross, evenings. Miller's Dairy Store, 1219
silanti. S. University.
TWI N-FEATURE
IC I N* PROGRAM!

FRIDAY, NOV. 20, 1942
VOL. LIII No. 41
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30a.m.
Notices
By recent action of the Board of
Regents, the following regulation is
now in force: "That as a condition
to continued attendance at the Uni-
versity the course, PEM 31, be re-
quired of all male students who, at
the beginning of a particular term,
are regularly enrolled in the Uni-
versity." This regulation applies to
all students who have not been ex-
cused.
Even though each male student
registered in the University has seen
a copy of the regulation, not all have
complied. Somg students have dis-
regardedit. Those students who are
delinquent must confer immediately
with Mr. Kenneth Doherty (Room 5.
Waterman Gymnasium), and make.
arrangements regarding their make-
up work. Otherwise action must be
taken by the Dean's Office of the
College in which they are registred.
Alexander G. Ruthven
Christmas recess: By action of the
Regents the announced time of the
Christmas recess has been changed
to the following: Christmas recess
begins Friday evening, December 18;
classes resume after recess on
Wednesday morning, December 30.
Classes will be held on January 1.
The above changes are occasioned by
transportation conditions during the
holiday season.
If you wish to finance the purchase
of a home, or if you have purchased
improved property on a land contract
and owe a balance of approximately
60 per cent of the value of the prop-
erty, the Investment Office, 100
South Wing of University Hall, would
be glad to discuss- financing through
the medium of a first mortgage. Such
financing may effect a substantial
saving in interest.
Naval Reserve Class V-1: Students
enlisted in Class V-1 are reminded
that they are required by the Navy
to take P.E.M. 31 or its equivalent

and that they may not be excused
except by a duly authorized repre-
sentative of the. Navy Department.
Any V-1 man who is reported as de-
linquent by the Department of Phys-
ical Education will be called upon to
show cause why his name should not
be reported to the Navy Department,
with the recommendation that he be
called to active duty as apprentice
seaman.
B. D. Thuma,
Armed Forces Representative
German Table for Faculty Mem-
bers will meet Monday at 12:10 p.m.
in the Founders' Room Michigan
Union. Members of all departments
are cordially invited. There will be
a brief talk on' "Selbsthilfe und Pro-
zess" by Mr. J. Wolff.
College of Architecture and Design,
School of Education, School of For-
estry and Conservation, School of
Music, and School of Public Health:
Midsemester reports indicating stu-
dents enrolled in these units doing
unsatisfactory work in any unit of
the University are due in the office
of the school on Saturday, Nov. 28,
at noon. Report blanks for this pur-
pose may be secured from the office
of the school or from Room 4, Uni-
-versity Hall.
Robert L. Williams,
Assistant Registrar
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments has received notice of teach-
ing positions which will be open in
the public school system of Cincin-
nati, Ohio. Anyone interested in
teaching in Cincinnati may obtain
complete information and application
forms from the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 201 Mason Hall, office hours
9-12 and 2-4.
Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information
The Engineer Board, War Depart-
ment, Fort Belvoir,' Virginia, is de-
sirous of employing the .following:
Junior physicists; Junior Chemists;
Engineering Aides, Electrical & Me-
chanical; Scientific Aides.
Either male or female, civil service
rating is not required, but a four-
year college course with a major in
physics would be necessary.
Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments has received notice of the fol-

lowing civil service examinations.
United States:
Junior Chemist; until needs of
service have been met; $2,000 a year.
Chemical Aide; until needs of serv-
ice have been met; $1,800 a year.
Teletype Operators; until needs of
service have been met; (for Wash-
ington , D.C. & vicinity only); $1,440
to $1,620 a year.
Office Appliance Repairman (es-
pecially qualified typewriter repair-
men); $1,860 a year.
City of Detroit:
Technical Aide; until further no-
tice; Business Administration, Medi-
cal Science, Social Sciences, Public'
Administration, Psychology, Mathe-
matics & Statistics; 20 to 30 age
limit; male & female; $1,716 per
year.
Further information may be had
from the notices which are on file
in the office of the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 201 Mason Hall, office
hours 9-12 and 2-4.
Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information
Mechanical, Industrial, Chemical
and Metallurgical Engineering Sen-
iors: Aluminum Company of Amer-
ica, Pittsburgh, Pa., representative,
is interested in interviewing Seniors
of the above groups for prospective
positions with that organization to-
day.
Interview schedule is posted on the
bulletin board at Room 221 West
Engineering Building..
Interviews will be held in Room
218 West Engineering Bldg.
(Continued on Page 4)

She's a streamlined
Mata Hal with
bells on ... and
she kisses at
the drop of
a military
secret

Today and Saturday
d~l! hat a oma

i

0 0
-~-
oo C
Here's one rumor we're
stopping right now - there
is no shortage of Pontiac
Protective Coatings and no.
reason why you can't con-
tinue to keep your homes
bright and fresh-looking.
So drop in today and let us
help you make plans for re-
newing and repainting your
homes.

'" 'a'

i

Virginiawh James
BRUCE ELLSON
Also

WE DELIVER

Johnny "Scat" Davis
Beyond the Line of Duty
News - Popeye Cartoon
Coming Sunday
"You Can't Escape Forever"

Pontfiac

300 E. Wash. Ph. 2-1350

-t

jIV


_

The Tenth An-nual

r

1.

1)

FLETCHER HENDERSON

f

GOOD, PLAIN HEARTY
FOOD

and His

Orchestra

II

INTERFATERNITY PLEDGE SING DURING INTERMISSION

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I

E

I

10

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