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November 18, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-18

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. I$; 1942
I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

eDNSANV 8 92?G ~

Michigan RanksFourth In Nation; Ohio State

Takes Fifth

4,'

Georgia and
Georgia Tech
Top AP Poll'
Boston College Holds
Third Place Position
NEW YORK, Nov. 17.-P)-The
best college football team in the land,
i the opinion of most of the 126
sports writers who voted today in the
Associated Press weekly poll, is un-
beaten, untied Georgia, but 37 of the
voters aren't convinced that the Bull-
dogs are as good as the Eagles 'of
Boston College.
Winners of nine straight games in
which they piled up 320 points' to 49,
for .opponents, Coach Wally Butts'
Bulldogs landed in the No. 1 spot,on
69 ballots to hold their place at the
head of the list of the nation's top
ten teams. .
Boston College, which walloped
Fordham, 56-6, last week, polled 37
first-place votes but still remained in
third place behind Georgia Tech, a
team that drew first-place mention
on only 13 ballots but had enough ad-
ditional support to hold its No. 2
rating.
A week ago, Georgia was picked
first on 85 of the 112 ballots, while
Tech polled 14 first-place voteĀ§ and
Boston College 10.
Michigan skipped from sixth place
to fourth on the strength of its con-
vincing victory over Notre Dame, but
the biggest jumps were made by Ohio
State, Tulsa and Minnesota. Tenth
a week ago, Ohio State moved up to
fifth place toddy after trouncing Illi-
nois. ,
Tulsa, only other team in the first
ten besides Georgia, Georgia Tech
and Boston College to boast a perfect
record, blanked Baylor, 24-0, and
jumped from ninth to sixth. Minne-
sota came up from 16th place to take
over the No. "10 spot.
The standings of the first ten
teams (first place votes in parenthe-
ses, points figured on 10-9-8-7 etc.,
basis):

II ' iifih e
BENCHCOMBEBR
By BUD HENDEL
Daily Sports Editor

* * * *
IN ORDER TO satisfy those people Just
who have been writing in and ask- Brown
ing about this business of a trophy Fieldin
between Michigan and Ohio State, teamn
and in particular to satisfy the edi- meet t
tors of the Ohio State Lantern, we phers.
print below the story of "MO." nothing
"MO," a harmless, red plaster that he
bull, was the invention of the in- But th
ventive genius of the Michigane
campus, Buck Dawson. Upon the offens
receipt of a letter from the Ohio aquaa
State Student Senate asking that fromnus
something be done about establish- Brown
ing a grid trophy between the two each
schools, Dawson went to the work eac
of having "MO" brought into this the oth
world. But a hitch in the proceed- SO WE
ings, namely the termination of the delib
trophy idea by the Buckeye menate, between
resulted in the end of "MO." Today eyes? If
he rests in peace in the Michigan pearanc
equipment room and Hank Hatch, delibera
Wolverine equipment manager, lulls Daily a
him to contentment with tall tales certain
of the great rivalry he almost sym- editorsc
bolized. by sayin
NVOW, NOBODY can deny that the is the o
Michigan-Ohio State grid rivalry a luable
is one of the most tradition-steeped in vam B
the entire country. Nobody can deny tom Bt;
that it produces some of the best tuis yea
pigskin spectacles ever to be seen on fute p
the gridiron. And nobody can deny attempt
that it has continued and flourished tured a
in spite of the drawback of not having the Micr
a trophy set up to impart its glorious dition
tradition. The glorious tradition seems T'RIF'
to take care of itself without the aid V A
of any piece of crockery. Magaz;
But this year the editors of the ance o
Ohio State Lantern bombarded this week
newspaper with letters requesting pictu:e
that a, trophy definitely be estab- have &
lished. Quite frankly, the gentle- Collier
men in charge of your favorite the la
American collegiate, daily could not lens lio
see any sense to the idea. Julie F
And here's why. A trophy, as far as Kuzma
we can .discover is not just estab- there i
lished. Something must lie behind it. wouldi
Now we know all about the rivalry Still
that lies -behind Michigan. and Ohio game .
State, but no trophy is needed to ce- touchdo
ment it. Every successful trophy, or urday a
at least the ones the most noted, are seven o
not just set up by two colpeting col- fall .
lege newspapers. No indeed. boys we,

glance at how the "Little
Jug" came into existence.
g H. Yost took a Michigan
northward to Minnesota to
he might of the Golden Go-
So particular was Yost that
g should disturb his players
e even brought along a Jug
Arbor water, clear and pure.
e students of Minnesota took
e to this smirch upon their
and they stole the jug out
nder the ever-watchful Wol-
. Today we call it the "Little
Jug" and the winning team
ear keeps it until it loses to
her. '
HAT WOULD there be behind
berately establishing a trophy
the Wolverines and Buck-
f one ever does make its ap-
e, it won't be because of any
te effort on the part of The
nd the Lantern. Spirit, that
intangible something that the
of newspapers don't produce
ng, "We now have a trophy,"
nly thing that can transform
red piece of nothinginto a
e something. And if the boys
uckeye town have the spirit
ar, there may be a trophy in
years. But we won't make any
s to have an object manufac-
rnd set it up as the symbol of
Lhigan-Ohio State rivalry. Tra-
means more to us than that.
t
FTWOOD AND SPLINTERS:
photographer from Colliers
ine made his annual appear-
n the Michigan campus this
he came here to snap the
es of those Wolverines who
, good chance of making the
s' All-American team
ds who were niugged by the
on of Colliers were Al Wistert,
ranks, Merv Pregulman, Tom
a and Elmer Madar ... and
sn't a coach in the land who
n't like to have them.
can't forget that Notre Dame
Michigan scored as many
wns against the Irish last Sat-
as the combined total of the
ther Rambler opponents this
. no wonder the Notre Dame
ere talking about a landslide
e flats of Michigan.
k Anderson, coach of the
ul Chicago Bears and for-
entor of the Irish, gives ere-
ere credit is due ... says the
"George Ceithaml means a
that team. ' He's the greatest
and smartest quarterback
en this season, and it was
ocking that made Michigan
. .and nobody will dis-
with him on that.

Bucks Boast
Power-Laden
Ground Game
Sarringhaus, Fekete
Spark Ohio Offensive
By BOB SCHWARZKOPF
It'll be a case of the irresistible
force against the immovable objectI
when Ohio State and Michigan meet
Saturday, for the Wolverines' Seven
Oak Posts will be up against a team
which has averaged over 300 yards1
rushing in Big Ten games this year.
This remarkable offense is chiefly
the work of the Buckeyes' two world-
beaters, Gene Fekete and Paul Sar-
ringhaus, who between them have
rolled up a rushing average of 187.7
yards per game, Fekete leading the
Conference with an average of 110.
But it won't be as easy as all that
this weekend if the Michigan line has
something to say about it. As other
Wolverine opponents will readily
point out to the Ohio backs, the Sev-
en Oak Posts have given up an aver-
age of only 85.3 yards on the ground
in conference games-and they don't
plan to let anybody ruin that average.
OSU Backs Powerful
Michigan's two main,.worries in the
Buckeyegame, Fekete and Sarring-
haus, not only rank first and fourth
in rushing yardage but they are one,
two in the scoring column and Sar-
ringhaus is fourth in total passing
yardage in Big Ten games. These two
boys, without any help from other
Ohio State backs, have scored more
points in conference games than has
any other Big Ten team with the sin-
gle exception of Michigan.
They have pushed the Buckeyes to
top spot in scoring and have helped
the Bucks'considerably in maintain-
ing their conference-leading pace of
18 first downs per game.
Sarringhaus Leads Attack
Sarringhaus is Ohio State's ace
passer and has tossed for an average
of 34 yards per game. In rushing, the
Buckeye halfback has an average
per try of 5.9 yards, while Fekete's
average per try is 4.6 yards. But it
isn't only these two that comprise the
Buckeyes' powerful offensive, for a
third member of that backfield, Les-
lie Horvath, has averaged 4.5 yards
rushing per try but has not com-
piled enough total yardage to be up
there with the Big Ten rushing lead-
ers.
That's the story of what is keeping.
the Ohio State eleven on top in the
Western Conference, the story of why
the Buckeyes were for three straight
weeks the nation's top team.
Wolverines Prepare
In preparation for the newly-de-
veloped Buckeye passing attack, the
Wolverines concentrated on pass de-
fense in yesterday's practice. Coach
Fritz Crisler also drilled his charges
in several new secret plays which
have been especially designed to meet
the Ohio State type of defense.
All members of the Michigan squad
were in uniform for, the first time
j in several weeks.

By BOB SHOPOFF
That blond kid is on the loose
again!
Tom Kuzma has fully recovered
from his early season injuries and is
now staging a belated, one-man cam-
paign for All-American honors. And
from all appearances the campaign
is gathering momentum like a snow-
ball rolling downhill.
Bothered by an ankle injury which
he suffered two days before the open-
ing game of the year, "Terrible Tom"
didn't get a taste of action until the
Northwestern battle. In that game he

trotted out on the green turf of the
Notre Dame Stadium.
Coach Paul Brown, and the Ohio
State team shouldn't need to be
warned of the power of Michigan's
flashy left half. Last year, playing his
first year, Tom was very much in mo-
tion as the Buckeyes tied the Wolve-
rines, 20 to 20. He personally account-
ed for one of the Maize and Blue
scores and passed for one of the oth-
ers.
Fans to Get Treat
This Saturday at Columbus the
80,000 that will witness the battle be-
tween Ohio State and Michigan
should get a treat if Kuzma lives up
to his usual form. When he gets those
piston-like legs moving, Kuzma com-
bines power and .drive with speed
which means he is tough to bring
down. Add to that passing argd kick-
ing ability and savage tackling and
you have a likely choice for an All-
American back.
MICHIGAN LEADERS

RUSHING'
Bob Wiese, fb ....
Paul White, hb .. .
Tom Kuzma, hb ..
Don Robinson, hb.
Bob Chappuis, hb .
Don Lund, fb .... .
Frank Wardley, hb
* *

'TERRIBLE TOM' ON THE LOOSE
Kuzma Opens Belated Drive
To Gain All-American Honors

OSU Frosh
Rated Best
In Ten'Years

TC
94
74
62
47
48
29
15
*

YG
362
410
230
228
242
141
83

YL
18
86
9
8
25
1
13
I
4
0
0
2
1
2

NG
344
324
221
220
217
140
70
NG
233
134
112
7.2
61
22

By AL STEINMAN
When Michigan's frosh football
team takes the field to battle the
frosh of Ohio State in Columbus this
Friday afternoon, it will be facing the
best Buckeye yearling squad of the
last decade.
Paul Brown, who handles the reins
for the State varsity, says that the
freshman team has the cream of all
the high schools in Ohio.
The Wolverine yearlings will be at
a definite disadvantage because Ohio
State has already played two games
and has had more of a chance to test
its stars under fire. They wn their
first battle from the Pittsburgh frosh
by the score of 21-7. Their secpnd tilt
was waged with Indiana and again
the Buckeyes emerged victorious, this
time 13-7.
Backfield Looks Good
Tomhny Phillips has sparked the
Scarlet and Gray attack thus jar, be-
ing hailed as thegreat'est passer in
many a year to hit Columbus. Along
with Phillips in the backfield, :is Rus
Wolfe who broke loose for many long
gains in both their games, and Joe
Whisler, a line breaking fullback. All
three of these men are capable of
making monkeys of the enemy de-
fense. Lou Groza, sensational place-
kicking tackle, is rated the main
troublemaker in the line.
Coach Wally Weber has been work-
ing his freshmen at a stiff 'pace in
an effort to speed up the team attack,
and supply the punch that was lack-
ing in the Michigan State game last
week.
Michigan Frosh Drill
Yesterday the squad drilled both on
offense and defense. Ralph Chubb,
hard-charging fullbackl, did not par-
ticipate because of a. sore foot, but he
should be all right by today or, tomor-
row. Outside of Chubb, .the teams was
at full strength.
Dick Walterhouse looked very good
as he connected time after time with
his passes. Art Renner, tall, lanky
end, was loking better than at apy
time this season, and back George
Guerre was ripping the line on off
tackle smashes.
Captain George Ceithaml and
Bob Kolesar received an invItation
yesterday from .VOach. Lyon Wa of
dorf of> Northwestern to play, for
the Blue in the annual North-
South gridiron battle to .be held
in Montgomery, Ala., pec. 26.
Neither of the two seniors have
decided whether or not they will
accept.

1.' Georgia (69)...........
'2. Georgia Tech (13).......
3.; Boston College (37).. .......
4. 'Mlchlgan '(3) .. .. ... .. .. .. .
5. Ohio State (1) ...........
6. Tulsa (2)................
7. Wisconsin...............
8. Notre Dame... . ...... ..
9. Alabama.................
10. Minnesota'.. .............

1171
1095
1025
827
609
532'
408
279.
266
150

TOM KUZMA
hard-hitting halfback who
got back into the form he showed
as a sophomore in pacing last Sat-
urday's attack against Notre Dame.
scored .one of the five Wolverine
touchdowns. The next week against
Minnesota he crossed the double line
twice for Michigan's 'only scores. He.
added another matker in the Harvard
walk-away.
Kuzma Scores Twice
Last week the Gary youngster said
his ankle felt the. best that it had all
year. He wasn't fooling either as he
went to work on tne Irish of Notre
Dame like a Marine takes to a Jap.
He racked up another :pair of, touch-.
downs and sparked the Wolverine de-
fensive play. Many of the nation's
top sports writers at the fracas stated
that Kuzma was the outstanding back
on the field Saturday. That is quite a
declaration when one stops to con-
sider the array of backfield men that

PASSING
Bob Chappuis, hb
Don Robinson, hb
Cliff Wise, hb .....
Tom Kuzma, hb .. . .
Paul White, hb ..
Frank Wardley, hb

PUNTING Kicks Av.
Cliff Wise, hb............4 40.4
Bob Wiese, fb...........15 35.3
Tom Kuzma, hb.1.......11 33.8
Don Robinson, hb.........4 26.5
Don Lund,fb ...........2 21.5
* * *

At,
50
29
15
18
12
3

C
19
10
7.
5
4
1

SCORING T
Paul White, hb ... 7
Tom Kuzma, hb . . 6
Jim Brieske, c ....
Aob Wiese, fb .... 3
Bob Stenberg, fb . 2
Elmer Madar, e ... 2
Don Robinson, hb. 2
George Ceithaml,

CA, CMFG Pts
42.
36
26 21 1 24
18
12
12.
12
Bob Chappuis,

Membersof the 2:15 PEM sec-
tion are asked to bring their blue
shorts to swimming class today
as pictures will be taken of the
group. Coach Matt Mann

You'll
Daily

like Samuel Grafton's
Column . . . on the
Editorial Page.

h ji

from th
Hun
powerf
mer m
dit wh
Hunk,
lot to1
leader
I've se
his bl
click."
agreev

FINEST P TURES FIRST

Frank Wardley, Warren Yaap, Mer-
vin Pregulman have scored one
touchdown each.

Goebel brewing Co., Detroit, Mich'
pill, _ __-____ _II___

LASTING
SENTIMENT
endures in precious metals.
Hand crafted gifts to your
special taste and for a
very special person.
Please order extra
early this season.

Big Ten Highlights...
Buckeyes Stress Passing to defensive measures today with con-
siderable stress being placed on a de-
COLUMBUS, O., Nov. 17.- (P)- fensive against the passing of Notre
Ohio State gridders got back to heavy Dame's Angelo Bertelli. Although the
work today and took a look at Michi- Wildcats have lost their last six
gan's powerful offensive plays. games, the squad is now at perhaps
After two days of rest, the Bucks its best physical shape since early in
were put through stiff workouts on the season and figures to be trouble-
the blocking sleds and tackling dum- some for the Irish Saturday.
niies. Michigan plays brought back * * *
by Scout Fritz Mackey were run Gophers Back in Lineup
against the Western Conference lead-
ers by a freshman team. MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 17.-(P)-The
* * * usual Tuesday lineup was posted in
Purple in Good Shape the Minnesota football team's dres-
sing room today, and it found big Bill
EVANSTON, Ill., Nov. 17.- (A)- Baumgartner and Don Nolader back
Northwestern devoted a full practice on the first team.
Be Prepared for the
Coming Cold Weather
A Few Suggestions. .
O'COATS - TOPCOATS
Finger-Tip All-Wool Coats
CORDUROY and WOOL REEFERS
LEATHER and SUEDE JACKETS
PLAID and SOLID COLOR WOOL SHIRTS
WOOL SWEATERS W- OOL HOSE
WOOL SCARFS - WOOL GLOVES
CORDUROY TROUSERS, ETC., ETC.

This is AP photographer Jak Rice in 'action "some-
where in the Pacific." He is one of many cameramen
covering the world's fighting fronts and the hoe
fronts for this and hundreds of other Associated
Press newspapers. These pictures - on the war,
sports, personalities, general news-are flashed to
this newspaper in record time daily. They pre
known as Telemats - the world's fastest matted

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