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November 08, 1942 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE II Hi IA DILY11

P; ke-lr stvrx

,... . -,., ti , .u ..
.

A

II If .

Illinois .... 14 Ohio State . 59
Northwestern. 7 Pittsburgh .. 19

Notre Dame
Army.....

13 Colgate ......35
0 Columbia ... 26

LSU . .
Fordham

... .26 Oregon ......14 Navy
.. .13 UCLA...... ..7 Penn

7

Corne

ll ......13 Georgia
.7 Florida

... 75
.. . . 0

0 I Yale

I

r +' T

Iowa

Upsets

Wisconsin, 6-0; Indiana

I

Whips Gophers,

7-0

I S

r

|

SIDELIGHTS

W. Gordan Lyle, reserve Harvard
halfback, suffered the most serious
injury incurred at the Michigan kta-
dium this year when he probably
broke a leg as the result of being hit
by three Michigan tacklers. The 170
pound senior was taken to the Uni-
versity hospital for X-rays before the
Crimson squad left for Cambridge.
The kicking was probably the
worst that Michigan fans have wit-
nessed in many a day with the Wol-
verines having a punting average of
16 yards and the Ilarvards a slight-
ly better 21 yard average.
Coach Fritz Crisler had to send in
Merv Pregulman in the fourth period
to center the ball, because Jim Brieske
had to leave that position to attempt
the conversion. Bob Chappuis held the
ball for Brieske on one of the conver-
sions because Don Robinson was get-
ting his shoulder taped.
Forty-four Wolverines participated
in yesterday's game which is more
players than Crisler has used in a
single contest since he arrived at
Michigan. Crisler used nearly this
number in the Chicago game of four
years ago when the Varsity won 85-0.
25,534 -fans saw the Wolverine-
Harvard game. This is the smallest
number ever to see a clash between
these two teams. In 1929 85,042
persons jammed the Michigan sta-
dium to see the Crimson and the
Wolverines.
Field attendants are still having
quite a bit of dog trouble. The game
was held up twice all on account of a
black cocker spaniel who wanted to
play in the Wolverine backfield. One
radio announcer told his audience,

. . . . By Mike Dann1
"At least the dog knows what side to
play on."
Dick Harlow, Harvard coach,
makes quite an impression on all'
who meet him. After the game yes-
terday he was so willing to talk and
discuss the game with reporters
that the press wondered if they
were in the right dressing room.
There was plenty of excitement- in
the Michigan dressing room after the
game, but when Jim Kline, football
manager, announced the defeats of
Minnesota and Wisconsin the boys
nearly went wild. Bob Kolesar, Wol-
verine guard, hollered across the
room, "I never realized what lovely
people the Hoosiers are."
James Masker, the referee who
made quite a name for himself at
Minnesota last week, officiated the
game yesterday. Nobody seemed to
have any objection to his being there;
and from all indications Masker did
a fine job. Anthony Haines, the head
linesman also, was at Minnesota two
weeks ago.
Michigan incurred more major
pvnalties yesterday than any other
time this year. Four 15 yard penal-
ties and a five yard penalty cost
them 65 yards.

Farmer

's

Pass Brings

Hawkeyes Great, Victory
Outplayed Hoosiers Score Winning Points
on Hillenbrand's Pass To Stop Minnesota
- - f r

IOWA CITY, Ia., Nov. 7.-(P)-
Iowa sent Wisconsin's proud Badgers
reeling from the nation's undefeated
football ranks today.
A trigger-like touchdown toss by
Tom Farmer and a dramatic goal-
line stand gave Iowa a stunning 6
to 0 upset victory that severely shook
Wisconsin's hopes for its first West-
ern Conference championship in 30
years and carried the inspired Hawk-
eyes into a first place tie with Illinois
and Ohio State.
Iowa, given a tremendous inspira-
tional lift by a cheering homecoming
crowd of 32,700, outplayed the Bad-
gers, who went into the slam-bang
battle with six victories and a tie in
seven games. The outcome gave Iowa
its third Big Ten triumph in four
contests.
Badgers Below Par
Only three times did the Crimson
clad Badgers, apparently operating
below the standard set in their 17 to
7 victory over Ohio State a week ago,
penetrate beyond midfield, and one
of those advances resulted from a
recovered fumble.
Iowa's hard charging line and alert
backs stifled the running attempts of
sophomore Elroy Hirsch and Pat
Harder and cut down desperate Wis-
consin aerial attempts as the Hawks
snapped the Badgers' victory string.
The only touchdown came after 10
minutes of play in the second period,
Farmer finishing an Iowa advance
from the Hawkeye 45-yard line with
a touchdown toss to Bill Burkett, big
senior end. The payoff throw was
good for 21 yards and the six big
points that Wisconsin couldn't quite
match.
The Badgers, however, made a
brave attempt immediately after the
following kickoff, but were halted
by the gun one foot short of a score.

MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 7.-(P)-In-
diana knocked Minnesota, the de-
fending Big Ten champions,, out of
any chance for a share in the 1942
title by defeating the Gophers, 7 to
0 today, on a touchdown scored with
only three and a half minutes to go.
The trusty right arm of Billy Hil-
lenbrand turned the trick for the
Hoosiers. The stage was set for Hil-
lenbrand's tosses when Bob Cowan
intercepted a Minnesota pass on the
midfield stripe and ran it back to
the Gopher 25.
Hillenbrand Takes Over
Hillenbrand made six yards in two
rushes and then shot a pass which
Pete Pihos took off his shoe tops as
he fell on the eight yard line. The
Hoosier Hot, Shot then pitched an-
other one to Pihos, who caught it on
the Gopher 5 and was tackled im-
mediately.
He wriggled free and after stumbl-
ing and touching one hand to the
turf, regained his balance and loped
across the goal line. Lou Saban
kicked the extra point.
With slightly more than three min-
utes left, the Gophers made a real
bid to tie the score after Indiana had
kicked off out of bounds. With Bill
Daley and Dick Luckemeyer throw-
ing the ball, the Gophers advanced
55 yards to the 10 yard line, where
the gun ended the game.
Gophers Boot Chance
The Gophers had other scoring
chances, the best of which came
when Herman Frickey ran a punt
back 75 yards to the Indiana 13.
Two plunges put it on the one but
a pass from center went wide and
resulted in a 12-yard loss.
Minnesota had the edge in the
statistics, scoring 11 first downs to
eight for Indiana, making 156 yards
by rushing to the Hoosiers' 124.

I Rejuvenated Illini Hand Wildcats Fifth Straight Defeat, 14-'7

EVANSTON, Ill., Nov. 7.- ()--v
Northwestern found out the hard way
tcday, where Elmer was when a guy
named Elmer Engel, senior end for
Illinois, cantered 53 yards for a third
period touchdown which pushed
Coach Ray Eliot's rejuvenated Illini
into a 14 to 7 victory before 35,000.
The win, Illinois' first over North-
western since 1937, placed the Cham-
paign in a three-way deadlock with
Ohio State and Iowa for the Western
Conference lead with three triumphs
and one loss. It was Northwestern's
fifth consecutive setback, the worst
losing string Coach Lynn Waldorf has
ad in 18 years of coaching.
Engel's game-busting run was ma-

nipulated when a bewhiskered statue
of liberty play fizzled for Northwes-
tern. Nick Vodick, coming around to
take the ball from Otto Graham's
hands, bobbled, and Engel stepped in
to snatch it from mid-air and gallop
to glory.
Illinois held a 7-0 lead at the half
afterSophomore Ray Florek carried
to the Northwestern 8. From there
Don Griffin tossed the ball to Red
McCarthy over the goal line. McCar-
thy placekicked both extra points.
Northwestern counted in the third
period following Engel's run. Aided
by a 15-yard clipping penalty against

v e
t

the Illini, Graham whipped up an
aerial assault by connecting to ITob
Motl and Lynne McNutt in succession
for 18 yards. Ed Hirsch knifed the line
for 15 more before Graham passe6 to
Vodick for 10 and the score. Guard
Al Pick went in to boot the point.
Rangers Top Canadiens
Fighting bitterly after the stubbrn
Montreal Canadians had sent the
game into overtime east night, the
New York Rangers came back to vin
finally, 4-3.

I I

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Ohio State ...
Illinois ......
Iowa .........
MICHIGAN..
Wisconsin.
Minnesota ...
Indiana.....
Purdue......
Northwestern.

..3
..
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1
2
2
3
5

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85
60
40
76
30
48
41
14
42

OP
44
55
32
46
13.
48
46
58
94

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Cougars Down Michigan State, 25-13

SPOKANE, Nov. 7.- (AP- A bril-
liant running and passing attack un-
leashed by Washington State brought
the Cougars a 25 to 13 victory today
over a crippled Michigan State team.
Neither Ed Ripmaster nor Walter
Pawlowski, injured last week in the
Temple game, saw action for the
Spartans today and quarterback Rus-
sell Gilpin went out of the game after
the first few plays.
Michigan State's star halfback,

Dick Kieppe, lived up to advance no-
tices, sharing honors with fullback
Morgan Gingrass.
Kieppe and tob Otting, substitute
quarterback, engineered the most
spectacular play of the day in the
last 10 seconds of the first half.
Kieppe took a punt on his own 10-
yard line and raced to the 30, lateral-
ing to Otting, who skipped clown the
sideline for 70 more yards to score.

Who Said Figures Tell the Story?

1.
Q 1'
,"
\\
fir... .
fi P ' '

First Downs .... .................................
Yards Gained Rushing (Net) .........................
Forward Passes Attempted ............................
Forward Passes Completed .......................... .
Yards by Forward Passes .... ...................... .
Forward Passes Intercepted by .......................
Yards Interceptions returned .........................
Punting Average (from Scrimmage) ............... .
Total Yards, All Kicks Returned ................... .
Opponents Fumbles Recovered ........................
Yards Lost by Penalties ..........................

11
156
15
5
67
1
10
21
70
2
45

14
280
17
5
88
4
97
16
19
0
65

%ZIYZ yy}1} l i } 1,11'"" .

: :

I

m..

CL VELAND
ARTJR RODZINSKI, Conductor

SYMPHONY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8 at 8:30 P. M.

- - - - - - .--Clip Here And Mail To A U.-M. Man In The Armed Forces- - - - - - - -
SERVICE tw A ,
EDITION NAO MICHI NEF 4
VOL. I, No. 12 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN NOVEMBER 8, 1942

ARTUR RODZINSKI,

Conductor of the

Cleveland Symphony Orchestra which
will give a concert Sunday, November

8 at 8:30 p.m.

in the Choral

Union

BIGGEST PROJECT yet
to be attempted by the
Student Manpower Corps
gets under way tomorrow
when 300 volunteers travel
to Sandusky, 12 miles
north of Port Huron, to
help labor-shortaged farm-
ers harvest a frost-threat-
ened beet crop . . . un-
precedented was the con-
sent by deans of lit, en-
gine and forestry schools
to a three-day official
"leave of absence" for all
volunteers beginning Mon-
day . . . each worker will
be paid government-set
wages and will room and
board with regular beet
workers . . . sobering note
for students eyeing this
chance to skip school work
and get paid for it was
Dean Erich A. Walter's
statement that "students
who contribute their labor
should feel that, even
though they have made
such a contribution, they

Michigan Wallops Harvard, 35-7
All Harvard's nightmares came true yesterday as
Michigan's mighty Wolverines roared the length of the
field four times in the first half and then sat around on
the bench during the second half to watch the reserves
swap touchdowns with the Ivy Leaguers to mark up
another impressive win, 35-7.
Speed merchant Paul White, powerhouse Tom
Kuzma and fighting Elmer Madar racked up the Wol-
verines four scores in the first half . . . mighty Bob
Stenberg, 170 pound fourth string fullback hit the Har-
vards for Michigan's last score in the final quarter....
Jim Brieske, the man with the golden toe, ran his
record for conversions up to 19 out of 21 tries, the last
12 of these in an unbroken string . . . Harvard got its
touchdown late in the third period when halfback Don
Richards set up a drive by intercepting Cliff Wise's pass
and returning to the Wolverine 43 . . . Richards then
tossed a 30-yard pass that set the Crimson up on
Michigan's one.

lieving the Majestic of its
scrap.
SPEAKING PUBLIC L-
for the first time since his
University war policies
were assailed last mor th,
President Alexander G.
Ruthven Friday defen led
his stand that the Univer-
sity's job is not "to develop
soldiers alone" before a
meeting of the Univer;;ity
Press Club . . . said she
president, "Our colleges
and universities seem to
be in danger of losing
sight of the basic concp-
tions" of democracy." . .
"The chief business of
schools in a democracy,"
he said, " . . . is the form-
ing of creative minds, 'he
study of human problems
and the preparation of
citizens to govern them-
selves intelligently." .
spew~ing to ;those who
doubt "the appreciation of
the nature and conse-
quences of the war by uni-
versity nrofessor."Ruth -

Series, Hill Auditorium,

Ann Arbor,

Michigan.
Tickets on Sale.
at the University Musical Society, y

scrap ... Lambda Chi was
close behind with a terrific
30,410 pounds. . . third
was Theta Xi with eight
tons to their credit . . . in
the sorority league, Alpha
fli I4'. I ra ..- n by l...rl

pily at the total tonnage
and aimed confidentlysat
the campus scrap and sal-
vage goal of 400 tons .. .
still untapped were such
reservoirs as the now con-
Rayv.pa 'N a*,n r. hrp~.,

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