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November 06, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRWIAY, NOV. 6,194"

THtlE 1IV ICHIGA N D AILY

tAGJ~ t1~REE

Hardee, Fekete Renew Fight for
Big Ten Rushing Title Saturday

,

IT'S HARLOW AND HIS LADS FROM HA'VAHD:

El B
BENCHCOM13E

Crimson Here Today; Practice at 2:30

CHICAGO, Nov. 5.- (R)- Fullback
Pat Harder of Wisconsin will be try-
ing to overtake Ohio State's Gene
Fekete for the Western Conference
rushing leadership Saturday when the
Badgers tangle with Iowa.
Fekete is the current leader with a
rushing average of 110 yards in four
games, according to official Big Ten
statistics. Harder has accumulated
an average of 98 in two encounters.
Elroy Hirsch, the Badgers' sopho-
more halfback, is in their place with
anl average of 84 yards, while Paul
Sarringhaus, Buckeye halfback, is
fourth with 77.7 yards.
Gophers Practice Passes
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 5.- (I)-
Minnesota's football team may *be

planning to fight Indiana Saturday
with its own weapon-passing.
Today the Gophers were put
through another long aerial drill in
a secret session. Bill Daley and Joe
Silovich did most of the passing for
the first two teams, while ends Jerry
Mulready and Herb Hein were on the
receiving ends most frequently.
* * *
New Wildcats to Play
EVANSTON, Ill., Nov. 5.-VP)-Two
players who never have started a
game for Northwestern, Bill Ivy and
Erv Weingartner will be at left tackle
and quarterback, respectively, when
the Wildcats meet Illinois Saturday.

Number 4 of a Series Appearing Each Friday
"The Story of the Allenel's Food"
Let's Hurry f r h
for that /
A T Etd
FRESH EASTERN HIALIBUT
ANOTHER ITEM from-the Allenel's outstanding Sea

By BUD HENDEL
Daily Sports Editor
TODAY'S human interest story isn't a pretty one, but all stories can't
have happy endings.
Lynn Riess, a laughing, gay, colorful Michigan sports figure for three
years, is dead. He was killed in a bomber crash over Great Britain, ac-
cording to the terse but meaningful newspaper statement.
Some of you don't remember Lynn. I don't myself, but I've talked
to those people who knew him best when he was on campus and
they've told me more than I need to know about one of the best-liked
Michigan athletes in recent years.
Lynn was on the golf team, and for three years he was one of the
standouts among the Wolverine linksmen. He won three letters, and he
left a mark of carefree cheerfulness which every person associated with
him never forgot.
He graduated in June 1941 after working his way through school.
A month later he enlisted in the Army Air Corps, and last August 11
he was married to a Shreveport, La., girl. He spent only a month with
his wife, being shipped overseas in mid-September.
Ben Smith, captain of the current Wolverine links squad, was one of
his best friends. Lynn spent some of his training time in Ben's home
town, Fort Myers, Fla., where he belonged to the 93rd Bomber Squadron,
the same squadron that made five successive daylight raids over the
heart of France this fall. Lynn took part in those raids.
Smith had been corresponding with him as much as possible, and
yesterday morning he was about to mail Lynn 12 letters that he had
reminded friends of the aviator to write. But before he dropped them
in a mailbox he picked up a Detroit newspaper and read of the account
of Lynn's death. Ben still has the letters, an even dozen written to
cheer Lynn up.
* * * *
B ELIEVE IT OR NOT, the fight is already on for the permanent pos-
session of the ball to be used in next Saturday's Michigan-Notre Dame
game, the first football cohtest between the two schools for 33 years.
The pigskin has been tossed into the war bond drive of St. Joseph
County in Indiana where the city of South Bend is situated. The ball
is to be auctioned off to the individual, group or concern buying the
most war bonds up to Nov. 13, the day before the fray.
Anyone is eligible to join the bidding, and to date the sales are over
the $17,000 mark, with $8,700 being credited to the children's ward of
Heathwin Hospital, a tuberculosis sanitarium near South Bend. Much
of the bidding is being done in the name of Michigan and Notre Dame
Alumni clubs, with each club promising to present the ball to its respec-
tive university as a trophy. Any Michigan alumhus, or student for that
matter, who wants to enter the bidding may do so by sending a check
to the circulation department of the South Bend Tribune. Your bonds
will be delivered by return mail.
MICHIGAN'S PACKAGE OF TNT:
Football First Love of Robbie,
Who also Stars on Diamond

Harvard's ponderous grid machine,
minus star quarterback Lloyd Ander-
son at the controls, arrives in Ann
Arbor at 9:30 a. m. today for the
Saturday clash at Michigan Stadium
with the high scoring Wolverines.

t'
n
v
v
Ii
s

two Michigan Red Shirts.
Tom Kuzma was kicking and run-
ning during practice. Though he fa-
vored his twisted ankle slightly, he
was still able to get away some excel-
lent punts, and his speed does not
seem to be lessened perceptibly. Don
Robinson's shoulder gave him no
great difficulty either, and both boys

Beaten four times and tied once in
six games, the Crimson warriors andg
Coach Dick Harlow will find refuge
at the Law Club and Michigan Union.
The Harvard pilot plans to send his
squad through a practice session at
the Stadium at 2:30 p. m.
A backfield composed largely of
freshmen and sophomores will hold
the hopes, already slim because of the
loss of Anderson, of the Cantab ele-
ven.
Chief of these is a young freshman,
Jack Comeford, who has had the
Eastern writers predicting great
things. Comeford is the leading score
producer for the Crimson with touch-
down passes against Penn and Prince-
ton, the latter a 49-yard heave which
gave the Crimson a last-second vic-
tory over Princeton a week ago.
Comeford is one of Harvard's best
runners.
Another sure starter is Wayne
Johnson at fullback. Although un-
spectacular, he has started every
game and seems to have that post all
to himself. One of the most colorful
men on the whole squad is Cleo
O'Donnell, a junior weighing only
147 pounds, whose passing produced
one of the five Cantab touchdowns
made this season and whose defen-
sive play is probably the best of any
Crimson back.
The fourth likely starter will be
Hank Goethals an untried veteran of
the squad who will have the big task
of replacing Anderson.
But it is a trio of youngsters, Paul
Perkins, Leo Flynn,' and Don-Rich-
ards, who may prove the big guns for
the Crimson with Comeford. Each of
these has at one time or another
stood out this season" with perhaps
hard-running Perkins as the best.
Facing a Harvard, line which out-
weighs the highly touted oak posts by
about. 11 pounds per man, apparently
causes Head Coach Fritz Crisler some
anxiety. So, yesterday's practice was
mostly devoted to line drill. However,
even, with two men concentrating, on
Julie Franks, the hefty guard, man-
aged to get through on almost every
play, and even a burly Harvard liie-
man can't have more' weight than

STn ..: : '
{vA'>:.

HANDKERCHIEF TEST PROVES VITAL ZONE
NO MATTER HOW OFTEN YOU SMOKE it
Uwi.

appear to be ready for Saturday's
game.
Elmer Madar, left end who has es-
caped the injury plague so far this
year, was in Health 'Service with a
severe cold Thursday, but Dr. A. W.
Coxon, team physician, said it was
probable that he will be in the start-
ing lineup Saturday.

4

L

RABI DEAU-HARRIS

COAT WEEK

Food Menu - our native Eastern Halibut.

One of

the largest of our 'Eastern specie is emphatically a
cold water fish . feeding on cod, haddock and
herring.
Delicious in flavor, the ineat is .,pitr. white and
very flaky. Marinated in -a th of -lemon juice,
broiled to a nice brown" and garnished with parsey
and lemon; Allenel Halibut . makes a
most 'tempting dish.
ALLEL

'".

,

I

Cr v i
th1~
cuWoO~
y 'ot pt

eW

By JOE McHALE
Football is his first love, athletics
his harem. Add the spirit and coor-
dination of a natural athlete to a
lifelong desire to come to Michigan,
and you'll see that the Wolverines

PHONE 4241

126 EAST HURON STREET

would be bound to
That something is a

have something.

rC/

_

3

5' 11", 167-lb. junior.
named Don Robin-
son: ever heard of
him? Not if Robbie'
had much to say
about it, for he's as;
modest and unas-
fuming a young gen-
tleman as ever you
will see. So let oth-
ers speak."
Ray Fisher, base-
ball coach, was lav-
ish with his praise ROBINSON
of him. "Much of
the credit for the showing of Michi-
gan's 1942 team that tied with Iowa
for the Big Ten championship
should hang on Don's shoulders,"
stated Fisher. "Besides leading all
Conference regulars in hitting, Rob-
bie was considered such a leader as
to be elected captain for his junior
year. If the Army Air Corps Reserve
doesn't take him, I look for him to
be the greatest shortstop I have ever
had at Michigan"-and that is nigh
on to twenty years.
Take it from Earl Martineau, who
has worked as Robbie's backfield
coach for two years, that no finer

guy ever shone in the football lime-
light. Don is a fighter who never
gives up, a hard worker who is bound
to improve, for form is inherent in
him and his efforts are bound to
bring it out. Most of all, Robbie is a
team player, wrapped up in the team
and devoted to the "kids"-and no
one on the squad is better liked than
Robbie. "If he only had a little more
weight, he could really tear 'em
apart," declared Marty.
Those of us who watch from the
stands never cease to wonder at the
amount of "tearing 'em apart" that
Robbie does. Who can forget the
play in the Great Lakes game when
Robbie, blocked out, still managed to
throw himself on Pete Kmetovic to
tackle him as he was touchdown-
bound; this was called by Crisler
"the most important play of the
game." What about his perfect pass
to Bob Wiese for Michigan's first
score against the Seahawks? A speed
merchant, Robbie returned a punt
for a beautiful 37-yard gain in the
Wildcat fray. Most of all, remember
the reverse on a punt in the waning
fourth quarter of the Minnesota
game when Robbie scampered for 52
yards to set up the Wolverines' sec-
ond, ineffectual touchdown? Playing
last week with a badly bruised
shoulder, Don still managed to aver-
age five yards every time he took the
ball.

WINGS WALLOP RANGERS-
DETROIT, Nov. 5.- (P)- 'The De-
troit Red Wings :buried -rookie- net
minder Steve Buzzinski of the New
York Rangers under a.12 to 5 defeat
in a National Hockey League 'game
tonight. It was the largest total ever
scored by a Detroit team.
UWM

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0 gOup

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Friday and Saturday
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3i

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