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October 25, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SAE TWO

T''E MICHIGAN DAtIly

SUNDAY, OcT. 25, 1942

IF _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _I- I_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two *daya (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on Reques.
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.
FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM in approved, quiet
home. 308 E. Madison. 2-2447.
FOR RENT: Half of large front suite
to girl student. One-half block
from campus. Mrs. Wood, 725
Haven Ave., phone 5938.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
ALTERATIONS
STOCKWELL & MOSHER-JORDAN
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678.

MISCELLANEOVS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 'S.
State.
MAKE MONEY-on your used cloth-
ing by phoning Claude H. Brown,
2-2736, 512 S. Main.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
LOST and FOUND
FOUNTAIN PEN-Brown Schaeffer
imprinted with M. E. Decker. Call
2-1405. Reward.
LOST.- Wallet, black. Containing
cash and checks. Substantial re-
ward. Finder return to Margaret
Warren, Mosher Hall.
HELP WANTED
DISHWASHERS WANTED. Meals
and compensation. Sorority. 407
N. Ingalls. 2-3119.
TYPIST. Male or Female. Accurate
with fair degree of speed. High
School or Commercial College
trained preferred. Permanent full
or part time position with long
established State Street Store, An-
swer fully. Box 38 Michigan Daily.
War Personnel Course
Given For Detroit Area
The fourth round table discussion
of the University of Michigan's course
in war industry personnel manage-
ment will get under way at 4 p. M..
tomorrow at the Rackham Educa-
tional Memorial in Detroit.
To date, fifty representatives of
war industries in the Detroit area
have signed up for the course, spon-
sored by the School of Business Ad-
ministration.
Professor John W. Riegel, Director
of the Bureau of Industrial Relations
and a member of the faculty of the
School of Business Administration, is
in charge of the course.

Big Campus
Scrap Drive
All Set To Gop
(Continued from Page 1)
tory of the University of Michigan--
is expected to pile up more than 40
tons" of scrap whch wil, be' turned
into the bullets, guns and tanks so
important to Uncle Sam in this war.
Drive Divided Into Sections
The voluntary scra p cllectors will
be divided into seven sections. They
will include fraternities, sororities,
rooming houses, Leage houses, men's
dorms, women's dorms and co-op
houses.
Each house-within-a-section will
compete for a special "excellency"
pennant which will be awarded be-
tween the halves of the Michigan vs.
Harvard football game on Nov. 7 to
the house collecting the most scrap in
the one week period.
It's a no-holds-barred campaign
where anything goes.
ile Srapt#In Frnt Of House
The cou tiy needs scrap and if you
have to pillage your neighbor's cellar
for junk, you'll be helping your house
win a special pennant and your coun-
try win a special war.
After you dig up all the scrap you
can find, pile it in front of your house
whether it's' Helen Newberry or a
rooming house on Packard Street.
Make the scrap-pile go higherthan
an elm tree'stopthe sky'sthe li'iit.
If 'you havetrouble fidin'srp
call either Bob Preiske or Bob aon
tho at The Daily, telephone 2-4-1.
Or you can call Al Anders atUni-
versity extension 21-9.
Totals To e Per Capita
Call 'thee felows up and say:
"Where can I find more scrap?"
They'll tip ou off to hidden loot be-
cause they've had their fingertips in
this scrap pile from the word "go."
This is strictly a per capita affair.
If you come from a rooming house
with ten male roomers and you col-
lect more scrap per head than the
fellows in the biggest rooming house
on campus, the pennant is yours.
The Manpower Corps, Mary Bor-
man says, will come around in trucks
and pick up the scrap from your frnt
door-step. It will be collected and
weighed on or before Tuesday, Nov. 3.
To Award Arm Bands
Manpower Corps members who turn
in a minimum of ten hours' work for
Uncle Sam will be given special work-
distiffction arm-bands.
HERE'S ANOTHER ANGLE YOU
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT.
Every organization on campus is
going to be given special salvage pro-
jects to do. For example, the Union
may be assigned to load up trucks
with the millions of tin cans scattered
around the University dump.
For another example, the IFC
might be directed to spend an after-
noon cleaning up all the metal in the
Engine Building.
#AILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SUNDAY, OCT. 25, 1942 .
VOL. tIll No. 19
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the 'day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.'
Notices
Faculty, School of Education, meet-
ing will be held on Monday, October
26, in the University Elementary
(Continued on Page 4)

SWARTMOUT
Has everything-
Voice, beauty, brains and
Fdusfry."

Caiillon Recital Today
(ttures Vocal Forms

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Featuring a series of vocal art
forms, Prof. Percival Price will pre-
sent his weekly Sunday recital at
7:15 p. m. today from Burton Tower.
'Professor Price will open his pro-
gram with two ariettas, a type of song
which marked the introduction of
modern singing. These will be fol-
lowed by two madrigals which are a
combination of independent melodies
sung together.
Three other ,groups of songs will
conclude the recital. Two of these, the
ie'der and the chanson, are the Ger-
man and French adaptations of the
seventeenth century arietta form.
Two-part songs, "Cofe Follow Me"' by
Henry Bishop and Brahms "Lullaby",
will complete the program.

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Prize Picture
In First Garg
With this month's issue of the Gar-
goyle, the photographic work of Miss
Nancy Hays, '45' will be shown for,
the first time as the campus humor
magazine prints her picture of a cam-
pus scene.
Miss Hays' 'photo of the month'
was chosen by th' Garg editors as
the best picture submitted for this
month. Anyone interested in entering,
the contest for next month's cover
photo should have his entry in by
November 11.
Inside the Garg in, its first issue1
this fall will be features and candid
photos centering around the football
theme. Gridiron favorites will be on
display in three pages of pictures,
and Captain George Ceithaml's 'In-
side Football' will give the news on
what goes on behind the scenes.

A special shelf of recent books on,
the war has been made available to1
students for home use, Prof. Warner'
G. Rice of the University library an-
nounced yesterday.
Dealing with almost every phase of1
the war effort, most of the books have
been published since Pearl Harbor.
However, many older books that have
special significance at this time are
included in the selection.
At present almost 150 volumes are
on the shelf and the library expects
to continue purchasing new books of
interest as they come, out, Prof. Rice
said.

The case is located at the head of
the stairway on the second floor near
the circulation desk.
Among the books represented are
biographies of Gen. Douglas MacAr-
thur, Sir Stafford Cripps, Secretary
of State Cordell Hull, Winston Chur-
chill and Generalissimo Chiang Ka-
Shek. Volumes dealing with all the
branches of the service are there ih-
cluding Col. William A. Ganoe's "His-
tory of the United States Army."
There are many editions dealing
with the place of women in the war.

Library Sets U p New War Case

Y

MOIEPREV IE WS.

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At The State . .
Two famous laugh-producing
teams combine in "Here We Go
Again," the new picture which
opens at the State Theatre today,
to follow up their previous comedy
with moire of the same.
Edgar Bergen and Charlie Mc-
Carthy vie with Fibber McGee and
Molly for the most laughs in this
picture that takes place in the neigh-
borhood of, a swank mountainresort
somewhere in the West.
The story involves most of the
characters of McGee's radio pro-
gram,e including the great Gilder-'
sleeve, Mrs. Uppington and Wimple.
The wealthy Bergen. who is search-
ing: for a rare American moth, be-
comes 'mixed up with Fibber when
he buys some synthetic gasoline that
later turns out to be fake. Fibber
himself was fooled and he spents
most of his time trying to get Ber-
gen's money back for him.
Ginny Simms shares romantic hon-
ors with Bergen in the picture and
Ray Noble and his orchestra furn-
ish the musical setting.
Mort Greene and Harry Revel com-
posed the two, songs of the film, "Till
I Live Again" and "Delicious Delir-
ium."

At The Michigan .. .
With a cast that seems to include
almost every actor and actress of
note in the cinema capital. "Tales
of Manhattan" opens at the Michi-
gan Theatre today.
A partial list of the stars in this
picture reads like a casting director's
dream. Charles Boyer. Rita Hay-
worth, Ginger Rogers. Henry Fonda,
Charles Laughton, Edward G. Rob-
inson, Paul Robeson, Rochester,
Thomas Mitchell and Cesar Romero
all play parts in a story that traces
the life of a full dress suit from Park
Avenue to Hell's Kitchen.
Ten well-known writers combined
ito write this biography of a coat.
It starts out on the handsome shoul-
ders of Boyer and ends up as a
scarecrow on sharecropper Paul
Robeson's farm. But' to get there,
the coat has to hang in a hock shop,
rip on the back of Charles Laugh-
ton directing a concert in Carnegie
Hall and play a vital role in a crime
plot.
Many stars in the picture had a
chance to interpret, and in some cas-
es, revise their own part, an unprece-
dented privilege granted by director
Julien Duvivier.

To Soldiers and Sailors Overseas ....
THIS IS WHAT YOU D0:1 Use official "VMail"form only. MAKES THE
Don't mark your regular mail "V Mail" as it won't get you t
this service. 2 Seal letter and address in usual manner. '
3 Put on same amount of postage as on regular domestic
letters. 4 Drop in any mail box or post office. .
THISIS WHAT HAPPENS:1"VMail"getspreferenceover
all other classes of overseas mail. 2 Government photo.
graphs your "V Mail" letter at their expense. (No one i
else sees it.) 3 Film is flown overseas or goes. by fastest
avaiable means of transportation. 4leter is delivered in
a fraction of the time usually required.
means ofieTiee n~ i A

SHOWS CONT INUOUS FROM 1 P.M.
WARFBONDS ISSUED WHILE YOU WAIT!

322 NORTH STATE

v

THURSDAY, OCT. 29,
8:30 P.M.
WTT T A T TThT'T n D TT T]tA'

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