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October 18, 1942 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-18

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UFO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

JR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.

Home of University Musical Society

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(hO rCt 'tono C05

Boston Symphony Makes.12th
Consecutive Appearance Here

Koussevitzky Will Bring
112 -Man Organization
To Ann Arbor Dec. 9
This year's Choral Union Series
will give the Boston Symphony Or-
chestra, under the able leadership
of Serge Koussevitzky, an oppor-
tuniy to appear in Ann Arbor for
the 12th consecutive year.
The Boson- Symphony will be
heard in. Hill Auditorium on Dec.
9 asone of the highlights in the
annulal concert series.
Considered as one of the largest
and finest symphony orchestras in
the world, this 112-man group of
musicians was organized 'in 1881 in
Boston. Conceived 'as a medium
through which everybody, not only
the musically educated, could under-
stand and appreciate classical music,
the orchestra has long since ade-
quately fulfilled its purpose. Com-
manding the attention of critic and
layman alike, they have aroused
audiences with their stirring pre-
sentations.
Their conductor, Serge Kousse-
Swarthout
To Present
jnyConcert Here
Ony woman ever to have sung for
the assembled United States Con-
gress, diplomatic corps, Si.reme
Court and the President, Gladys
Swarthout, mezzo-soprano of the
Metropolitan Opera Company, will
sing the second of the Choral Union
concerts Thursday, Oct. 29, at Hill
Auditorium.
Her performance before these bod-
ies occurred in the Senate at the
150th anniversary exercises celebrat-
ing the founding of Congress. Other
appearances, have taken here before
what vestiges of European royalty re-
mained before the war.
Famous for her amazing repertory
of operatic roles which has enabled
her to step into many parts without
rehearsal, Miss Swarthout is one of
the few major American operatic ar-
tists to have received all her train-
ing in the United States.
She began her musical career at
the tender age of thirteen when she
pinned up her curls, announced she
was nineteen, and applied for a po-
sition in a church choir in Kansas
City. "My sole motive for getting
that job was that I didn't like the
way the incumbent soloist held her
music," she says.
She got the job but before the audi-
tion she had already made what
amounted to her concert debut in a
church recital during which she fail-
ed once on a high note, tried again,
made it, and by her courage induced
a wealthy Kansas City family to fi-
nance her musical education.
Miss Swarthout continued to sing
for several years in church and con-
cert work until friends arranged an
operatic audition for her in Chicago.
After -winning the job she had to
learn 23 roles in the short space of a
summer.
The Metropolitan in New York
called her to its' storied ranks as La
Cieca in "La Gioconda." The debut
was such a success that the manage-
ment assigned her to leading roles in
French and Italian operas.
The attractive soprano had yearned
to sing "Carmen" eversince she had
heard Farrar and Caruso in Kansas

vitzky, hasbeen directing theor-
ganization since 1924. He was born
in Russia wherein he established
himself as one of the leading con-
ductors in the world. After making
fast his fame in the music capitals
of Europe, Koussevitzky was brought
to America to lead the Boston Sym-
phony. His'annual appearance in
Ann Arbor. has secured him many
fast friends here.'
According to Dr. Charles A. Sink,
President of the University Musical
Society, this year's edition of the
Boston Symphony .;Orchestra sees
them at their height of technique.
Their repertoire includes all the fine
classics to which -they have added
works of contemporary American
composers.
Each chair in the symphony is
filled by a master musician who
could be a distinguished soloist.
Blended together,,these master mu-
sicians present a music with all its
beauty.,
Organized by the late Colonel
Henry Higgonson in Boston in 1881,
the orchestra has since grown in
size and popularity. Higgonson, who
amassed a fortune in Michigan cop-
per mines, was proud each time the
organization played in this state.
Besides their regular concert pro-
gram in Boston and New York they
are touring many Midwestern -cities
this fall.
The stark realization of war issues
has made the Boston Symphony ap-
peal to its patrons not to relegate
the importance of music in wartime.
Music has a definite role to play
and the Boston Symphony is deter-
mined not to fail in its obligation to
the American people.
Every man in the 112-man group
has done his part in making this
Symphony orchestra one of the fin-
est in the United States. It has set
traditions by its many activities.
Koussevitzky is so bound up with
mouling the form of music in Amer-
ica, that his name is seldom omitted
when American music is discussed.
Society boasts
A Continuous
Music Record
Since 1879 when it was organized
the University Musical Society, spon-
sor of the Choral Union concerts, has
maintained a continuous existance
plus providing good music for the
Univeisity, the community and the
country as a whole.
Incorporated in 1881 under the
laws of the State of Michigan as a
non-profit organization the Society
has since maintained its concert ac-
tivities only through the sale of ticl-
ets.
In addition to the Choral Union
Choral Union Chorus and the May
Festival Concert Series, thus provid-
ing Ann' Arbor with the best in both
local and world-famed musicians and
musical organizations. The concert
series started modestly and gradually
expanded to 10 annual performances
which were climaxed by the Festival.
Present officers of the organiza-
tion are.Dr. Charles. A, Sink, presi-
dent of the Society; President Alex-
ander G. Ruthven,. vice-president;
Oscar A. Eberbach, treasurer; Shirley
W. Smith, secretary-treasurer, and
Thor Johnson, conductor.
- Direction for the Musical Society
is provided by a board composed of
the officers of -the organization and

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20
DON COSSACK CHORUS
.Serge Jaroff, Conductor
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29
GLADYS SWARTHO UT ... Mezzo-Soprano
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8,
ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor, and the
CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19
ALBERT SPALDING.. Volinist
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
ARTUR SCHNABEL . .Pianist
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor and the
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
MONDAY, JANUARY 18
JOSEF HOFMANN . .Pianist
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16
JASCHA H EIF ETZ . . . . Violinist
FRIDAY, MARCH 5
GUIOMAR NOVAES . . . . Planist
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
NELSON EDDY Baritone

All Concerts Begin at 8:30 p.m. E.W.T.

TICKETS

NOW

ON

SALE

OVER

-THE

-COUNTER

Every Day Beginning at 8:30 a. m.

BURJiTON

MEi'AORIAL

TOWER

Ticket Prices Include Tax

Season

Tickets

$1320

$1100

_ g80

Sinn Ip

Ti~rcat

$9275

$4220

$165

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