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October 18, 1942 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-18

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SU# tiAY'OCT, 18,.1942.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Artur Schnabel,
Noted Pianist,
Will Play Here
Austrian Artist Will Give
5th Concert Of Series;
Program Set For Dec. 3
Artur Schnabel, the renowned con-
cert pianist will return once again to
Hill Auditorium on Thursday, Dec. 3
for another Ann Arbor recital.
Born in Lipnik, Austria, in 1882, he
undertook a concert career after
studying for five years under the
world famous Leschelizhy. Although
this career was largely restricted to
European performances, he did, how-
ever, make a trip to the United States
in 1922. During the period from 1901
to 1933 Schnabel made his home in
Berlin, where he firmly established
his teaching reputation as Professor
of the Hochschule in that city. Pupils
flocked to him from all over the
world. He also continued to perform
with the finest symphony orchestras
in Europe.
After a concert engagement with
the Boston Symphony in 1933, he left
Germany and went to London where
he then made his home. There, with
Malcolm Sargeant and the London
Symphony Orchestra he recorded
among other works all five of Bee-
thoven's piano concertos.
Internationally recognized as the
greatest living interpreter of Bee-
thoven, Schnabel has gained this rep-
utation through his intellectual ap-
proach to music. His performances
are characterized by fine interpreta-
tions rather than brilliant displays of
showmanship. Due to this many of
his performances and recordings are
greeted with highly conflicting re-
views.
In spite of his reputation, Schnabel
does not wish to be known as a Bee-
thoven specialist. "A musician should
not carry a label of any kind, he
says. "I play Beethoven because I
like his works." On tour he also in-
cludes Mozart, Schubert, Bach and
Schumann in his repretoire.
His operatic tastes show a strong
preference for Verdi and a great dis-
like of Wagner, whose music he de-
scrbes as a baroque velvet curtain
behind which is vacancy. In the field
of composition he has tried his hand
at the writing of ultra modern cham-
ber music.
When Schnabel plays here, the
audience might as well be prepared
4for the fact that there will be no
encores. Schnabel does not believe in
them, his reason being that they
distort the structure of the program.
Only once did he break his iron
bound rule and that was because a
faulty chair prevented him from
playing the first part of the program
to his own satisfaction. Therefore he
felt he owed it to Beethoven to make
amends for the injustice done to his
music.
Schnabel now resides in the United
States and after a year's absence
from the concert stage, during which
he devoted himself to composing, is
now once again giving recitals as well
as performing with the major sym-
phony orchestras of the nation.

Tentative Programs -
1942-43 Choral Union Series

.1

GLADYS SWARTHOUT - October 29
Program
*"Lascia ch'io pianga", from "Rinaldo" .. Hendel
*Come Again Sweet Love .............Dowland
(1563-1626)
*"La Speranza" from "Ottone"..........Hendel
*Aria: "Connais-tu le pays" from "Mignon"..
...... ....... ......................... Thom as
Two Songs of the Auvergne .. Arr. by J. Canteloube
a. Passo pel Prat (Come by the Fields)
b. Malurous qu'o uno fenno (Unhappy He Who
Has a Wife)
*Cantiga de Ninar .................. Mignone
*El Majo Discreto .................. Granados
*Romance de Solita .................. Pittaluga
Intermission
Time (Suite for Voice and Piano) ............
.Clarence Olmstead
(First Performance)
Miranda .................... Richard Hageman
The Linden Tree .............. Charles Griffes
The Pasture .................. Charles Naginski
*Into the Night .................. Clara Edwards
Sing, O My Heart ............ Charles Kingsford
*Victor Records

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA - November 8
Program
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36 .. Beethoven
Adagio molto; Allegro con brio
Larghetto
Scherzo
Allegro molto
"Spirituals" for String Choir and Orchestra ..
...............................M orton Gould
Proclamation
Sermon
A Little Bit of Sin
Protest
Jubilee
Intermission
Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique"
............................... Tschaikowsky
Adagio; allegro non troppo
Allegro con grazia
Allegro molto vivace
Finale; Adagio lamentoso
ALBERT SPALDING - November 19
Program
Sonata in A major ............ Corelli-Spalding
Sonata in C minor, Op. 30, No. 2 ...... Beethoven
First Sonata-Fantasy .............. Villa-Lobos
Variations ............................ Joachini
Intermission
Nocturne, Op. 27, No. 2 .......Chopin-Wilhelmj
Scherzo Valse ................ Chabrier-Loeffler
En bateau ...........................Debussy
Caprice (Etude en forme de valse) .........
.......... Saint-Saens-Ysaye
ARTUR SCHNABEL - December 3
Program
Sonata in C minor, Op. posth .........Schubert
Sonata in D major (first movement 6/8) .. Mozart
Sonata in A minor .................... Mozart
Sonata in B-flat major, Op. posth ...... Schubert

Two GreatX
Gladys Swarthout has everything - voice, beauty,
brains, and industry, according to a distinguished
critic. These qualities have brought her fame in opera,
concert, radio, and sound films. She occupies a fore-
most place at the Metropolitan Opera and has partici-
pated in major capacities in many other important
opera companies. In concerts each year she thrills
audiences in the great musical centers everywhere.
Thursday, October 19

Tocctli

sts

.. i'".."Yi; i..rj

Gladys Swarthout

j

LESTER HODGES, Accompanist

HEIFETZ - February 16
Program
Sonata No. 8 (K. 296) . . ................. Mozart
Chaconne (violin alone) .................. Bach
Intermission
Concerto No. 4 ...................... Vieuxtemps
Russian Group:
a. Larghetto ....................... Prokofieff
b. March .......................... Prokofieff
c. Prelude ...................... Shostakovitch
d. Meditation .....................Giazounoff
e. Scherzo ...................... Tschaikowsky
Emanuel Bay at the Piano

No introduction is needed for this great American
baritone. Mr. Eddy possesses a "voice heard round
the world," and as an American ambassador-at-large
his fame has encircled the globe. In' addition to splen.
did diction he possesses distinctive gifts for acting,
and great personal charm and magnetism. From first
to last he is completely and naturally American -
stardom has not spoiled him.

Photographs Line Sink's Office

Great performances of the past still'
live in the headquarters rooms of the
University Choral Union at the base
of the towering Baird Carillon.
Cream of the musical greats of the
last quarter-century still in their con-
cert primes, look down from a huge
collection of pictures which stud the
walls of two of the big rooms where
the Choral Union has its offices.
Each autographed, in most cases
inscribed, the four hundred or more
pictures all were personally collected
by Dr. Charles A. Sink, President of
the University Musical Society. His
office walls, completely covered with
pictures of great performers whom
Sink has known intimately, are a
museum of modern musical greats.

In adjacent frames, Dr. Sink will
point out Fritz Crisler, Lily Pons,
John Philip Sousa, Nelson Eddy, all
who have entertained ,at Ann Arbor
in the last quarter-century. At ran-
dom from the other side of the room
he can select Helen Jepson, Enrico
Caruso, Walter Damrosch.
Chamber Music Festival
Main feature of the Third Annual
Chamber Music Festival, which will
take place January 22 and 23, will
be the appearance of the famed Roth
String Quartet. The group com-
prising a first and second violinist,
violist and violincellist will give three
concerts during the Festival.

NOTICE
Tickets for the individual con-
certs are now on sale at the offices
of the University Musical Society
in Burton Memorial Tower. The
sale ofseason tickets is continuing.
Patrons are urged by Dr. Charles
A. Sink, president of the Society,
to purchase theirs as soon as pos-
sible,

4

Nelson Eddy

Wednesday, March 17

Choral.

Union

Concerts

i

"
Guiomar Novacs
Brilliant Brazilian Pianist
The University Musical Society takes great pleasure in announcing
that Guiomar Novaes, brilliant woman pianist, has been scheduled
for the March 5th Choral Union concert. Quoting the New York
World-Telegram after a recent New York performance, "The recital
by Guiomar Novaes made it clearer than ever before that she is a
poet of the keyboard. The personable Brazilian pianist breathed
magic into a well-chosen group of pieces. She gave each of them
particular care, the proper tonal proportions, a world of colors, and
played with that ultra-smooth finish we have come to admire and
to envy."_

HEIFETZ' very name means "violin" to the entire civil-

ized world.

For about two decades he has maintained

a foremost position among the great violin virtuosi of
all time. Season after season he is always welcomed
back to the scenes of his earlier triumphs. His Ann
Arbor audience is looking forward to his return engage-
ment at Hill Auditorium..
Tuesday, February 16

Jascha Heifetz

VIOLINIST
ALBERT SPALDING's career shatters the old idea that rank-
ing musicians must be long-haired foreigners. Of Amer-
ican birth and training, his achievements have been
recognized ' throughout the musical world. Often re-
ferred to as the "aristocrat of the violin," he is a man

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