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February 21, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE 11ICHIGAN IAILY

SA'TURIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 194$,

I .

i

Complications
Cause Tie-Up
At Willow Run
Real Estate Organizations'
At Loss To Stop Shacks;
Legal Obstacles Appeair
(Continued from Page 1)
ton to work with Robert Cameron,
county sanitation engineer, on the
sanitation problems of Willow Run.
In order to transport the U. S. offi-
cial here, the Ypsilanti Defense
Board and the Washtenaw County
Board of Supervisors contributed
$200 each-and they have given the
green-light on all steps taken since.
The real estate companies have sig-
nified their willingness to encourage
all private builders to construct
homes for the laborers but wildcat
operators continue to stall attempts
of control over shacks.
The Federal Mousing Authority is
recommending that houses be rented
full-blast and rates such houses high
in priorities. However, a builder can-
not afford to construct homes just
to rent because there is no profit in-
centive in the practice. (Real estate
companies argue that workers can
destroy and depreciate rental homes
too readily.)
From here to Detroit there are in
the neighborhood of 15,000 lots which
bear $2500 covenants and real estate
interests urge that these lots are
within the income means of laborers.
Vego Nelson, president of the. Real
Estate Board here, does not believe a
house constructed for less than $3500
is "livable" and stresses that immedi-
ate construction can be started for
workers who will be obliged to pay
$35 or $45 per month.
But most of these lots are not in
the near vicinity of the bomber plant
by at least three miles. Thus, the
traffic problem will be intensified'
more than ever. Besides this, the lots
are scattered and an effective hous-
ing program with full servicing will
be blocked.
Solons Liberalize
Workless Benefits
ILANSING, Feb. 20.--(P)-The Leg-
islature concluded its second special
session tonight, enacting a bill to
liberalize unemployment compensa-
tion benefits in the war transition
emergency.
By its own terms, the measure will
become operative February 28, rais-
ing maximum benefits from $16 a
week to $20 a week; maximum dura-
tion from 18 weeks to 20 weeks; min-
imum benefits from $7 a week to $10,
and minimum duration from eight
weeks to twelve.

Calls For Sacrifice

Kaufman-Hart
Farce To Have
USOShowing

_.

Repertory
Comedy
At Fort

I

Cast To Play
For Soldiers
Custer Clil)

Lieut.-Gen. Ben Lear (above) in
an interview assailed the wishful
thinking of Americans and warned
that the war cannot be won by a
golden Maginot Line, but by blood
and sacrifice. General Lear praised
the spirit of the army.
IIs Discussing
Rehabilitation
ineC teUiversiteSpeeh Cliec in
ore o ics e pobem ore
habilitation of wounded soldiers and
civilians after the present war.
This group which is composed of
graduate students is directed by H.
Harlan Bloomer, head of the Speech
Clinic. Dr. Hide Shohara, also on
the staff of the Clinic, is assisting
Dr. Bloomer in the seminar.
The members of the seminar will
investigate the types of defects and
the various methods of rehabilitation.
At the conclusion of their meetings,
they will draw up a bibliography on
the subject.
It has been found that the head
injuries of this war far exceed the
number of accidents in the last war.
Because of the marked advances in
brain surgery however, the mortality
rate has decreased.
"In spite of this medical progress,"
Dr. Bloomer declared, "there still
remains a very, grave problem. Vic-
tims of head injuries often suffer
from an aphasia which may cause
speech defects through damage of
the phonetic or articulatory organs.
"What can be done for the rehabil-
itation of this type of injury," Dr.
Bloomer continued, "is the problem
which we will consider in this semi-
nar."

Members of Play Production of the
Department of Speech will leave for
Fort Custer again today to give the
second of two performances of
"George Washington Slept Here,"
under the auspices of the United
Service Organizations.
The Kaufman-Hart comedy has
been shown in Ann Arbor on two
separate occasions. The first took
place last summer when the Michi-
gan Repertory Players presented it
with Claribel Baird in the leading
role. It was also given last month as
the third of Play Production's win-
ter bill.
C The same cast which appeared last
month will go to Fort Custer today.
Miss Ethel McCormick, social di-
rector of the League, declared that
this is the first opportunity for send-
ing the company to the camp. al-
though requests for the show have
been numerous.
The performances are being given
in the USO Club Theatre at Augusta.
Because the stage there is smaller
than the Lydia Mendelssohn's, the
crew left very early yesterday to try
to fix the sets so they could be used
there. Today, however, the cast and
crew will leave together at 3 p.m. in
a bus provided by the USO.
This is not the first group of local
students to send entertainment to
Fort Custer. Last month Filipino
dancers and the Women's Glee Club
Smade the trip.
Art Exhibition
Continues Run
Sponsors Claim Display
Has Record Turnout
The regional arts and crafts show
of the Ann Arbor Art Association,
well into the first of a two-week rim,
was reported yesterday as being one
of the best attended displays that'
the group has sponsored this year.
i This exhibition in the Rackham
Building, designed particularly to in-
terest Michigan students, includes
paintings by Prof. Jean Paul Slusser
of Ann Arbor and Charles Culver of
Detroit, and the work of two ceram-
ists, Grover Cole of Ann Arbor and
Mary Chase Stratton of Pewabic
Pottery in Detroit.
Professor Slusser's paintings in-
elude many which were made during
a recent sabbatical leave which was
mostly spent on the west and east
coasts. Culver is one of the better
known Detroit artists.
In the pottery field, Cole is in-
structor in charge of clay modeling
and ceramics in the architecture col-
lege, while Mary Chase Stratton has
done important work in the field,
in addition to currently lecturing in
the ceramics department.
Hostel Rally Tonight
Folk dancing, stories, songs and
refreshments will feature the youth
hostel rally to be held at 8:30 p.m.
today in the Women's Athletic Build-
ing. At this first major meeting, the
question of raising funds for the
Pickney hostel will be discussed.

Australia Gets First Taste Of Actual War
CHINA
CLUTTAHN FORMOSA 100
R Asloot
RANGOO}N -
BAN~KCK ::::. x MAN L.L ISLNDS "
{ MN GUAM'
ATES ThV o CAROLINE IS,
STATES
SARAWAK
EQUATOR 9 \
C L'4ARCH
'e CL
BATAVIA AMICINA 1 GUINE
~...A A .OERABA.JA
OR
TIMOAN * MORESBY
DARWIN
0 500 AUSTRALIA
MILES ,
AT EQUATOR
Port Darwin (1), north coast Australian naval base, was bombed by Japanese in an hour-long raid,
probably from bases in Celebes and New Guinea (broken arrows). Java and neighboring Dutch islands still
lay under menace of invasion. A Japanese advance towards Rangoon on the Burma front (3) proceeded, but
the Chinese claimed a victory in a Thailand thrust (4).

Dean Dana Heads
Forestry journal
Another editor was added to the
ranks of Michigan editors when word
was received Thursday by the School
of Forestry and Conservation that
Dean Samuel T. Dana of that school
has been appointedl to head the
"Journal of Forestry." official pub-
lication of the Society of American
Foresters.
Dean Dana, who in the past has
served as both president and vice-
president of the Society, succeeds
Dr. Henry Schmitz of the University
of Minnesota. Dean Dana received
the appointment from the governing
council of the Society.
DR. GRABOW
PIPES
for sale at
SWI F T'S
340 South State
Kinkin
$WI ,"
N
lit a -

Jacoby's

Speech Highlights Last Day

Of Annual State Highway Conclave
4c

By CHARLES THATCHER
A talk by John C. Jacoby, Wayne
County attorney, on "Retirement An-
nuities for County Road Employes"
marked the annual meeting of the
Michigan Association of Road Com-
missioners and Engineers which yes-
terday morning officially closed
the three-day twenty-eighth annual
Michigan Highway Conference.
New association officers for the
coming year will be George Rovonski
of Gogebic County, president; B. D.
Jeff, of Missaukee County, vife-presi-
dent; and L. F. Levine of Chippewa
County, secretary-treasurer. Lee O.
Brooks, retiring president, presided
over the meeting.
The meeting officially closed a
conference at which all but a few
seemed agreed that it is imperative
for highway engineers to begin plan-
ning now for post-war highway con-
struction program as the best means
of averting a post-war depression,
Kennedy Speaks
Supporting this contention was
State highway Commissioner G. Don-
ald Kennedy, who presented the main
address of the conference at the ban-
quet Thursday in the absence of Gov.
Murray D. Van Wagoner.
Only dissenter to the post-war
planning program was Maxwell Hal-
sey of the Michigan State Safety
Commission, who declared that the
primary problem at present is to win
the war, and that there should be no
concern about post-war preparation
until victory is won.
Other conference speakers noted
the increasing difficulty which may
be expected in obtaining materials
for road construction and mainten-
ance, and warned that many substi-

tutions are already in use and others
will be necessary.
Highways For Defense
The importance of good highways
for defense and war transportation
was also emphasized, and it was dis-
closed by J. G. Schaub of the State
Highway Department that a new
highway to the Willow Run bomber
plant is being planned,
The last word in traffic safety, this
super-motorway will eventually be-
come a link in a projected highway
connecting Chicago and Detroit.
Althougla other sessions were gen-
eral meetings, traffic officers, county
road commissioners and State High-
way Department men met separately
Thursday afternoon to discuss prob-
lems peculiar to their own particular
fields.
Bingay Speaks
One of the few non-highway men
appearing on the conference pro-
gram, M. W. Bingay of the Detroit
Free Press, told the banquet audi-

ence that it is probable the United
Nations will not begin to actually
win the war until the fall of 1944,
when the industrial might of the
United States will really begin to
make itself felt.
The lack of appropriations is al-
ready being felt in many districts,
and other conference speakers ob-
served that strict economy must be
practiced, but that "we must continue
to give reasonable service even in the
face of dificulties," as Commissioner
Kennedy put it.
R. H. Steketee of the Wayne
County Road Commission pointed out
that road markings are as important
to safe travel as the condition of the
highways themselves, and urged close
attention to this factor.
The conference was presented un-
der the direction of the College of
Engineering in cooperation with the
Michigan Association of Road Com-
missioners and Engineers, the Michi-
gan State Police and the State High-
way Department.

$150
The only correct
way to break in a AN D
pipe is to smoke it."
Linkman's mechan-
ical smoking ma-
chine Pre-smokes
every DR. GRABOW
with fine tobacco.
MADE BY M. LINKMAN & CO. * j OTTER
.Mahewa 4 IolIyatrt/p Pd~i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
Aspects in the Life of George Wash-
ington." After the speech a, gift
just received by the Center will be
disclosed.
Michigan Outing Club will have a
Hostel Trip this week-end to the
Saline Valley Farms. The group will
leave from the Women's Athletic
Building at 2 o'clock oh Sunday,
February 22, and will return Mon-
day. Small charge. If interested in
more details, call either Dan Saul-
son (9818) or Libby Mahlman (2-
2539).
Graduate Outing Club will meet
Sunday at 2:30 p.m., northwest door,
Rackham. Program of winter sports.
Faculty Women's Club: The -Mon-
day Evening Drama Group will meet
Monday, February '23, at 7:45 p.m.
at the Michigan League.
Churches
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Sunday: 8:00 a.m., Holy Commun-
ion; 9:00 a.m. Parish Communion
Breakfast, Harris Hall; 10:00 a.m.
High School Class; 11:004 a.m. Kin-
dergarten, Harris Hall; 11:00 a.m.
Junior Church; 11:00 a.m. Morning
Prayer and Sermon by the Rev. Hen-
ry Lewis; 5:00 p.m. Confirmation
class; 6:00 p.m. Evening Prayer and
Meditation by Dr. Lewis; 7:30 p.m.
Episcopal Student Guild Meeting,
Harris Hall.
The Church of Christ will meet for
Bible study at 10:00 a.m. Sunday in
the YMCA. During the morning wor-
ship at 11:00 Garvin M. Toms will
preach on the subject: "God-His
Light, Knowledge, and Life." For the
evening service at 7:30 the theme will
be "Pure and Undefiled Religion."
Midweek Bible study is to be Wednes-
day at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is wel-
come

ister, will preach on "What Do We'
Need Most?"
5:'30 p.m. Ariston League, high
school group, will meet in Pilgrim
Hall. Dr. Parr will be the guest
speaker, and his subject will be, "The
Rise of the Christian Church."
7:30 p.m. Student fellowship in
the church parlors. Following a
Lenten worship service, Dr. Elzada
U. Clover will show motion pictures
of her trip down the Colorado River.
Refresliments.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Mind."
Sunday School at 11:45 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church: Morn-
ing Worship, 10:45. "The Open
Heaven," Lenten sermon by Dr. W.
P. Lemon.
Westminster Student Guild: Sup-
per and fellowship hour at 6:00 p.m.
Dr. Jones of Dodge Community
House, Detroit, will speak on "The
Field of Social Service."
Trinity Lutheran Church: Church
Worship services at 10:30 a.m. with
sermon by Rev. Henry O. Yoder on
"Christ and the Cross and the Crises
of Life-When Temptation Lures."
Zion Lutheran Church: Worship
services at 10:30 a.m. with sermon
on "Room for Repentance" by Mr.
Clement Shoemaker.
First Methodist Church and Wes-
ley Foundation: Student Class at
9:30 a.m. with Prof. Hance in the
Wesley Foundation Lounge. Morn-
ing Worship Service at 10:40 o'clock.
Dr. Charles W. Brashares will preach
on "All Colors in Prayer." Wesley-
an Guild meeting at 6:00 p.m. Dr.
Brashares will speak on "Patriotism
-Pagan or Christian?" Graduate
Group will meet at 6:00 p.m. in the
Recreation Room for discussion of
the theme "Are You Letting the War
Get You Down?" Supper and fel-
lowship hour for both groups at 7
o'clock.
Memorial Christian Church (Dis-
ciples): 10:45 a.m. Church worship

This Is No
BULL!!
THE NEW
GAUG
IS TOPS!

r

MEN DLSS
T HEATI
Art Ciner'no 1egu

LAST TIME TONIGHT 8:15 P.M.
JOHN STEINBECK'S
>OHN
RF

41k _"
Leugu

Burgess Meredith)
RESERVATIONS (39c)

(Narration by
PHONE 6300 FOR

m

I

y ut

DON'T MIISS,,..

THE PICKET
LINE FORMS
ON THE

SThe com inig of

Mr. John

The Invasion of Ann Arbor. . . a fantasy

RIGHT...
Strictly speaking, there is no picket line outside our door, but
if our customers decided to indulge in such diversion their
signs would bear complimentary adjectives. People who cat
here go home to tell their friends how well they like our
food. It's mighty satisfying for us to realize that this is true,
and we'd like to list you among that group. What do you say?

I

J-Hop Souvenir,
Your Michigans

Section
Laywers' Club

I

9 Days in Heaven
* Other Features Too

Numerous To Mention

Unitarian Church: 11:00 asm.
Church Service. Mr. Marley will
speak on "Journalism in War and

t
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I %A*

U70mr A m Clow "'V 1. W.

1 Lit

I

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s

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