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May 17, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-05-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO

SUNDAY, MAY 17, 194"

Plays To Be Held In Arboretum.

Flames On The Burma Front

A double feature program, pre-
sented by the speech department, will
be given by Play Production students
at 4:30 p.m. today in.the Arboretum.
The performance of "The Taming
of the Shrew," postponed Friday be-
cause of rain, will be the last play
production performance of the sem-
ester. Directed by Dr. Palmer Chris-
tian, a madigral singer will furnish
music.
The cast for Shakespear's comedy
includes James Stephenson, '43, Pe-
,truchio; Strowan Robertson, Grumio;
Lawrence Vincent, '43, Hortensio;
Peggy Evans, '43, -Bianca; Margaret

Cotton, '42, Katherine; and John
Babington, '44, Baptista. Jim Wolfe,
'42SM, Lucentio; Lucy C. Wright, '44,
Curtis; Dorothy Cummings, '43, Wi-
dow; and Barbara Townsend, Lynn
Kimpton, Martha Courtis, Pages.
Other participants are: James Ro-
selle Merle Webb, '42, John Hatha-
way, Barbara White, '45SM, Eleanor
Kinzer, William Kinzer, Ed Whalen,
'43, George Jacquillard, Wallace Ros-
enbaum, '43, and Jeanne Nadel, '43.
The active rehabilitation program
of ?merican railroads has returned
many freight cars to service,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

- ---:

CLASSIFIED ADVEBTISING

SUNDAY, MAY 17, 1942
VOL. LII. No. 173
Publication in the Dany Official
Bulletin Is constructive notice to gal
members of the University.
Notices
University Senate: There will be
a meeting of the University Senate
on Monday, May 18, at 4:15 p.m. The
place of the meeting has been
changed to the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
AGENDA
Admission Statistics, Registrar I.
M. Smith.
Report of the University War
Board, Professor H. J. Heneman.
Regulations on Leaves of Absence,
Provost E. B. Stason.
Faculty in Government Service,
Assistant Secretary H. G. Watkins.
General Remarks, Dr. A. G. Ruth-
ven.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary.

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TYPING

bility of riding with others.
is sabotage.

WasteI

L. M. HEYWOOD, experienced typist,
414 Maynard Street, phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
TRANSPORTATION
ALLIED VAN LINES, INC. Long
distance moving. Call Godfrey's.
6927. 410 N. Fifth Ave. 350c
HELP WANTED
PART TIME help wanted for house-
work. Man or woman student. 50c
per hour. Call 7516.
A SENIOR architectural draftsman
for an established architect's of-
fice. Must have good design rec-
ord. Give necessary details, Box
395.
RADIO SERVICE MAN: part time
now, full time during summer.
Only competent and experienced
man considered. Good pay. Apply
in person only. Stofflet's, 331
Main. 391c
SHOWS DAILY at
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
ANNANBOFS f~m'57 rTN A4 .9
Starts Today!
HE SUPRISE HIT
OF THE TEAR!I

TAILORING and SEWING
ALTERATIONS on ladies' garments
carefully done. Some slipcover
work. Inquire at 2-2678. A. Graves.
Please keep ad for future reference.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
STUDENTS' BUNDLES WANTED-
6c per lb.,.rough dry. Shirts extra
10c each. Handkerchiefs, le each.
Phone 25-8441. 295c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING -- Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State.6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel,Cwashed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
WANTED TO BUY
WILL PAY good price for used bi-
cycles. Please call Jim Hynes, Law
Club, 4145. 387c
WANTED TO BUY, a portable type-
writer in good condition. Call
2-3839, Mrs. Van;
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St., phone 2-2736. 5c
CLOTHES BOUGHT, AND SOLD-
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-,
ton. Phone after 6 o'clock, 5387.
WANTED-Men's and/or women's
English type bike with 3-speed
gearshift. Cash. 2-6392 after 6:00
P.m.
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY-
Pay $5 to $500 for Suits, Overcoats,
Typewriters, Saxophone, Fur Coats
(Minks and Persian Lambs),
Watches, and Diamonds. Phone
Sam, 5300.

Japanese bombings of Maymyo, former Allied headquarters some
25 miles northeast of Mandalay in Burma, resulted in fires like
these. It was Maymyo where this picture was made by Life Photog-
rapher George Rodger while Gen. Joseph Stilwell still headquar-
tered there, that was recaptured by the reportedly isolated Chinese
force which drove north from Taunggyi.
Johnston Defends 'Workshop'
A'Aid To Professional Skills

The "workshop" as a valuable
technique which gives opportunity
and freedom for experienced teach-
ers and supervisors to work on sig-
nificant professional problems, is de-
fended by Prof. Edgar G. Johnston of
the education school in the new edu-
cation bulletin soon to appear.
Inaugurated at the University last
summer, the workshop will be con-
tinued this year, expanding its pro-
gram to include three fields-teacher
education, guidance and curriculum.
The education workshops are held
primarily "to aid school systems in
the state to re-examine their pro-
grams in the light of known best re-
search," says Professor Johnston in
his article. "The atmosphere is in-
formal and routine planning gives
way to a more flexible organization
of time and projects."
As more than two-thirds of the
enrollment is to consist of super-
intendents, principals and supervis-
ors, very careful selection of instruc-
tors, or consultants is necessary. "One
of the most important considerations
in planning the workshops," says
Professor Johnston, "is the selection
of consultants, for this type of pro-
fessional activity demands a high

degree of flexibility and imaginative-
ness on the part of the staff."
Professor Johnston presented evi-
dence of the workshops' value as he
quoted the opinions of men and wo-
men who participated. last summer.
They described it is "a distinct op-
portunity to work on significant pro-
fessional problems; an experience in
situations involving group working
and thinking, democratic organiza-
tion and administration; an informal
social and professional atmosphere."
Recommendations were made to have
longer workshop periods, more time
for study, fewer outside speakers and
more available consultants in the
1942 summer session.
Professor Johnston concludes that
"adequately staffed and with appro-
priate recognization of its special
functions, the workshop has a sig-
nificant place in the total pattern
of professional education of teach-
ers."
Hopwood '
No ts
While the 57 contestan~ts in the
eleventh annual Hopwood comnpeti-
tion await announcement of the win-
ners, the Hopwood Room, under the
direction of Roy W. Cowden, Pro-
fessor of English, canl only give out
information about past Hopwood
competitors.
Dr. Clifford H. Prator, of the Ro-
mance Language department, winner
of a minor award in essay in 1933
and a major award in drama, 1934,
is the author of a long-titled book-
let, "Freron in the Light of Variants
in the Text Lettres sur Quelques
Ecrits de ce Temps."
Two ex-Hopwood (coitfest a of s are
rcceiving favorable notjices for their
current publicati ns: Harriet Ball in
the ,New Yorker and the New York
Times Book Review section for her
novel, "Each Alone"; and Barbara
Fleury in the New York Herald Trib-
une for her "Faith the Root," the
Catholic Book-of-the-Month choice
for June.
The ,Jan.:;1-i;0in-ur venngPost
('calried Franre .Jcii H jus filltnaii S
man >>was a vardled (the $1000 prize in
the first Hopwood (ulitecst, in 1931,

Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting of
February 28, 1936:l
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or Summer Session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are<
subject to this regulation; however,1
student loans not yet due are ex-
empt. Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day of
classes will be reported to the Cashier
of the University and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semes-
ter or Summer Session just complet-
ed will not be released, and no tran-
script of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or Sum-
mer Session until payment has been
made."
Shirley W. Smith,
Vice-President and Secretary.
Will all those students holding pro-
bationary or special commissions in
the United States Naval Reserve whoi
expect to receive a degree from the
University on May 30 please leave
their names at the Information Desk
in the Business Office. We wish to
record this fact in the Commence-
ment Day program.
Herbert G. Watkins
Faculty, School of Education: the
May meeting of the faculty will be
held on Monday, May 25, in the Uni-
versity Elementary School Library.
Tea will be served at 3:45 p.m. and
the meeting will convene at 4:15 p.m.
Your cooperation is requested in
returning to the University Store-
house all empty containers of the
following nature: Typewriter ribbon
spools and boxes, Scotch cellulose
tape metal boxes and individual dis-
pensers, collapsible metal tubes of all
kinds, drums, pails, cans, barrels, and
other similar articles. These may be
accumulated and turned over to the
Storehouse truck-driver when a new
delivery is made. This is necessary
to obtain stock replacements because
of recent restriction orders by the
W.P.B. 0. E. Roszel
Staff Travel by Automobile: As a
measure of economy it is requested
that faculty and staff members who
have occasion to travel on Univer-
sity business by personally owned or
University owned automobile report
their plans in advance to the office
of Dr. Frank E. Robbins, Assistant to
the President (Campus telephone
328), in order that, when feasible,
persons going to the same place at
the same time may ride in the same
car anid save both tires and expense.
At rcord of such planswill be kept
in the PrcJident'st Office, and those
who find it necessary to make a trip
may inquire there as to the possi-

LaVerne Noyes Scholarships: Pre-.
sent holders of these scholarships
who desire to apply for renewals fora
1942-43 should call at 1021 Angelli
Hall and fill out the blank forms for
application for renewal.
Frank E. Robbins
Freshmen and Sophomores, College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts:
Students who will have freshman or
sophomore standing at the end of the
present semester and who plan to re-:
turn either for the summer term or
the fall term should have their elec-
tions approved for the next semester
that they expect to be in residence,
as soon as possible. There will be
little or no time to sign up returning
students during the registration peri-
ods preceding either of these semes-
ters, so it is strongly urged that this
be taken care of now. You may
make an appointment with your
counselor by telephoning Extension
613 or by calling at the Office of the
Academic Counselors, 108 Mason
Hall.
Arthur Van Duren, Chairman,
Academic Counselors.
Undergraduate Women: Students
are reminded of the regulation that
they are expected to leave twenty-
four hours after their last examina-
ation. Permission for any other ar-
rangement must be secured from the
Office of the Dean of Women.
Jeannette Perry,
Assistant Dean of Women
The Bureau of Navigation desires
to appoint 1,000 officers in the Supply
Corps, Class SC-V(P) in the Naval
Reserve. It is intended that officers
so appointed upon completion of their
college courses be given course of in-
struction in the Navy Supply Corps
School at the Harvard School of Busi-
ness Administration. Upon the suc-
cessful completion thereof they will
be commissioned in the Supply Corps,
Class SC-V (G), and assigned to duty
as Supply Officers for General Serv-
ice.

Applications will be received from
students of the Senior class 1942-43
who normally would graduate in
June, 1943.
Interested applicants may call in
person at the NROTC Headquarters,
North Hall, between the hours 3:00-
4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
R. E. Cassidy, Captain, U.S. Navy,
Professor of Naval Science
and Tactics
The Tenth Annual Pharmaceutical
Conference, sponsored by the College
of Pharmacy, will be held in the
Rackham Amphitheatre on Tuesday,
May 19. At 2:30 p.m., Mr. Richard
M. Yale, representative of S. B. Pen-
ick and Company, will speak on "The
Botanical Drug Industry Under
World War Conditions." His ad-
dress will be accompanied by mov-
ing pictures showing methods of col-
lecting important botanical drugs.
Dr. Charles F. McKhann, Professor
of Pediatrics and Communicable Dis-
eases, will discuss "Recent Progress
in the Study of Poliomyelitis." At
the evening session, beginning at
7:45, Dr. Howard B. Lewis, Director
of the College of Pharmacy and Pro-
fessor of Biological Chemistry, will
discuss the "Fortification and En-
richment of Foods and the National
Health." The public is cordially in-
vited.
Medical Laboratory Technicians:
A limited number of Laboratory
Training Fellowships of the W. K.
Kellogg Foundation, paying $62.50
per month, are now available to qual-
ified senior and graduate women to
enable them to complete their train-
ing.in an approved hospital. Further
information and application blanks
may be secured at the Office of th'e
Department of Zoology, room 3089
N.S. G. R. LaRue.
(continued on Page 4)

r

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11

D. P. Dutton & C.
PUB)4ISHERS, NEW -YORK
announce that Mr. Willian
Main Doerflinger, Associate
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12:30 and 6 P.M. today. All
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for the eneral public are

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