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May 13, 1942 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-05-13

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PAGE TWO

THE- MICHIGAN -DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 1942

. r,. .- . a, a

Mrs. Ruthven
GveS Colors
To NROTC
First Company Honored
In Navy Day Review;
500 See Cerenmony
Assembled before 500 spectators
last night at Palmer Field, the black
and white ranks of the Naval ROTC
battalion watched Mrs. Alexander G.
Ruthven present the colors to the
First Company, selected as the color
company for the coming year. The
ceremony took place as part of the
battalion's observance of Navy Pay.
Mrs. Ruthven, carrying a large bou-
quet of yellow roses and attended by
Capt. R. E. Cassidy, head of the
naval science department, gave the
colors to Lieut. B. H. Crawford, '44,
company commander. Awards were
also made to the outstanding pla-
toon, First Platoon of the First Com-
pany, commanded by Cadet Lieut.
E. G. O'Brien, .'44E, and the out-
standing squad, the First Squad of
the First Platoon, Third Company,
led by Fourth Petty Offider R. M.
Orlikoff, '44.
Presentation of the awards was
followed by a parade of the color
company and the entire unit, which
passed in review before a group head-
ed by President Ruthven. Pacing to
the martial airs of the battalion's
Drum and Bugle Corps, the marchers
were viewed also by Captain Cassidy,
Lieut.-Col. G. B. Egger of the ROTC,
and Dean and Mrs. A. H. Lovell,
besides other naval and army offi-
cers and members of the University
War Board, of which Dean Lovell is
chairman.
The units of the battalion receiving
the awards have been selected in a
year-long competition based on at-
tendance, excellence of drill and
scholarship, sailing, proficiency, in
the use of small arms, and speed in
loading the unit's four-inch gun. The
ceremony this year is the first of
what is to be an annual series of
presentations.
A comic note was provided during
the review when the inevitable small
dog-this time a disreputable hound
pup-began to howl an accompani-
ment to the music of the Drum and
Bugle Corps, after surveying the
white-capped ranks.

Engine Speebh
Society To 1Iold
Annual DinIier
Union Is Place Desigiated
For Sigma Rho 12au s
13 Tvig Oil Banquet.
The famed Cooley Cane, last rem-
nant of a former campus fence to
keep neighboring cows off the grass,
together with a lot of fun and horse-
play will be bantered about whenI
Sigma Rho Tau, engineering speech
society, holds its thirteenth annual
Tung Oil Banquet at 6:15 p.m.
Thursday in the Union.
Not exactly a thrmw-back to can-
nibalism or sadism, this yearly pro-
gram will provide engineering stu-
dents with a chance to watch faculty
members labor under the ordeal of
giving impromptu speeches in com-
petition for the Tung Oil Crown.
Last year's winner was Prof. R. L.
Morrison of the highway engineering
department speaking on the topic,
"Modern Trends in Women's Hats."
Officers of the local chapter. very
mysterious about the banquet plans,
have announced that several of the
most intricate and ingenious devices
have been devised by the stump
speakers to keep all faculty speeches
under the time limit. Bob Tink. '45E.I
publicity man. reported that it was
a "Tung Oil" banquet instead of aI
"tongue oil" one, only a minimum
of the latter'being tolerated.
Named for Dean Emeritus Morti-
mer E. Cooley, the cane is annually
given to the society's most outstand-
ing junior. A prized award, it is the
last relic of a former day when
pranksters tore up the anti-bovine
fence and carried the pickets into
Dean Cooley's class the next day.
Dubbed "Cooley Canes" by the stu-
dents, the pickets were used by the
genial dean as canes for several
years.
The speakers of Sigma Rho Ta
are expected to be in a mood for
hilarity at the banquet which culmi-
nates a year of successful forensic
endeavor. Recently the group gar-
nered one first place, two second
places, and one third at their annual
convention at Toledo. Speakers were
John C. Hammelef, '42E, Alex M.M
Pentland, '42E. Jerome L. Goldman.
'45E, and Warren M. Shwayder, '45E.
Tickets for the banquet can be
obtained at the Union desk or at 214
West Engineering Building.

Performance
Brings Praises
For Actor Reid
Lauded for his "sustained" per-
formance in S, N. Behrman's farcical
"No Time For Comedy," 1942 Dram-
atic Season opener now playing at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, is
Carl Benton Reid, celebrated char-
acter actor.
No newcomer to the Ann Arbor
stage, Reid has appeared here in
"Henry IV," "Man and Superman,"
and "Ice Bound," when the Cleveland
Players used to bring three and four
plays a season to the old Whitney
Theatre. As a member of the Michi-
gan Repertory Company, organized
by faculty member O. J. Campbell,
Reid played locally as well as in
Jwckson, Flint and Pontiac.
Played Dr. Hagget
Even participation in the Dram-
atic Season is no novelty for the ac-
tor, who played Dr. Hagget in the
1939 offering. "The Late Christopher
Bean," starring Pauline Lord. The-
atre-goers will have ample oppor-
tunity to see Reid this season, as he
has important roles in all of the four
productions.
It might have been "Uncle Gene's
notion wagon-he peddled needles,
pins and phoney jewelry," that first
instilled the idea of acting in his,
mind, the actor suggests. Uncle Gene,
needing an entertainer to drum up a
crowd at each stop of his van, taught
young Carl how to sing, tap dance
and play the tambourine. Mother in-

.._..

U. S. Needs 0
Fori-or't Y

"7

CARL BENTON REID)

The Army and Navy are in urgent1
need of doctors and, as in the case
of other highly technical personnel,
demands greatly exceed the supply,
at present available.
The Army requires six and a half
doctors for every one thousand men;
thus it will need the services of
45,000 doctors for a contemplated
military force of 7,500,000. At pres-
ent the Army has 14,000 doctors,
leaving 31,000 more to be procured
as full force is achieved,
The Navy is also greatly in need
of medical men. Navy officials esti-
mate their requirements as six doc-
tors per thousand men, or 3,000 for
a contemplated force of 500,000.
At present there are 62,000 medi-
cal practitioners in the entire United
States between the medical draft
ages of 27 and 45. As this reservoir
cannot be extensively tapped without
seriously impairing civilian medical
service, the demands of the military
must largely be met by speeding the
flow of new doctors directly into the
armed forces and into positions va-
cated by civilian practitioners called
for war service.
Curricula Accelerated
Realizing the seriousness of the
problem, medical schools throughout
the country are accelerating their
curricula. Under normal conditions,
medical schools graduate 20,000 doc-
tors in a four-year period. By elim-
inating vacations and thus reducing

tervened, however,
all ready to "do the
able to accompany
the newly-acquired
persisted.

and Carl Reid,
circuit," was un-
the vendor, but
taste to perform

the length of the medical training
program from 48 to 36 months, they
will graduate an estimated 32,000 per
four-year period.
"The University of Michigan Medi-
cal School is doing everything in its
power to aid the nation's war effort,"
according to Dean Albert C. Fursten-
berg. "Naturally, our greatest con-
tribution will be in the thorough and
rapid training of doctors to fill the
urgent needs of the Army and Navy.
To do this job, maintaining medical
education on a high standard, and
to offer graduate instruction for
medical officers of the armed forces,
makes it imperative that we keep to-
gether an adequate teaching staff."
The greatest problem faced by the
medical school is in maintaining its
faculty. Already it has given 104
members to the armed forces and has
another 36 enrolled in an Army base
hospital unit which expects an immi-
nent call to active service. Never-
theless, the medical school has accel-
erated its curriculum along with oth-
er schools and will increase enroll-
ment in its next freshman class by
20 percent.
Graduate Courses Offered
The school will also offer graduate
courses to a number of medical offi-
cers beginning July 1.
The next freshman class will be
admitted to the school in June and
will take courses during eight weeks
of the summer term. The medical
school was recently offered a grant
of $10,000 by the W. K. Kellogg
Foundation, which will provide fi-
nancial aid for students who ordinar-
ily work during the summer months
to earn all or part of their expenses.
The Wartime Commission of the
United States Office of Education
is now working on a plan which
will provide similar assistance.

Graduate Council
Arranges Picnic
For Next Friday
A picnic, with outdoor sports. and
all the other trimmings, will be held
Friday, May 15, on the Island by the,
University Graduate Council.
The group will assemble at 5 p.m.
near the northwest door of the Rack-
ham Building. At a meeting held
last- Friday in the Rackham Build-
ing, the Council elected its major
officers for the coming year. They
are: Ivor Cornman, president; Karl
Kessler, vice-president; Robert Stev-
ens, treasurer; Harriet Smith, execu-
tive secretary; Wilma Eldersveld, re-
cording secretary.
It was decided at that time to hold
subsequent council meetings every
fortnight and alternately on Tues-
days and Fridays at 5 p.m. Other ac-
tion taken was the decision to con-
tinue the rotation of committee posi-
tions so that all members may take
an active part in the affairs of the
Council.
THE JOHN MARSHALL

Stock Good Training
Stock, which offers excellent the-
atrical training, Reid claims, for
"special thinking, concentration and
intensified memorization," formed
the major part of his drama experi-
ence.
His imposing list of dramatic ac-
complishments includes participation
in the "Radio Guild," "Big Sister,"
"Gang Busters," "Grand Central Sta-
tion," "Aunt Jenny" and "sustain-
ing program" radio shows.

LAW
SCHOOL
F O U N D E D,1899
AN ACCREDITED
LAW SCHOOL
TEXT AND CASE
METHOD
FACULTY OF
PRACTICING
LAWYERS
0
For Catalog and booklet,
"StudyofLawand Proper
Preparation", address:
Edward T. Lee, Dean.

LAW
Afternoon and Eve-
ning, 3% years-
2yearsCollege re-
quired for entrance.
POSTGRAD. LAW
Courses in Practice
Evening-I year
PATENT LAW
Evening-i year
Law degree or ad-
mission to Bar re-
quied for Post Grad.
or Patent Law
courses. All courses
lead to degrees.
PRE-LEGAL COURSE,
OffersE2 yrs. College
NEW CLASSES FORM
IN SEPT. AND FE.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

~~

CLASSIFIED ADVERTuSING

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY--2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
STUDENTS' BUNDLES WANTED-
6c per lb., rough dry. Shirts extra
10c each. Handkerchiefs, 1c each.
Phone 25-8441. 295c
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-White coat, double-
breasted. Almost new--Size 37,
short. 920 Sybil. 384c
FOR SALE-Tux, size 37. New this
year. Several symphonic and vocal
recordings. Call Osborn, 5213. 379
HELP WANTED
SALES HELP WANTED: Steady ex-
tra work in shoe department. Es-
pecially interested in students who
will be here all summer. Apply Mr.
Levy, Kline's Department Store.
380c
STUDENTS for full or part time em-
ployment. We now are employing
students successfully. Must be 21
or over. 40% of total fares,. Ap-
ply at Radio Cab Co., 344 So. Main
St. Ask for Mr. Smith.
FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR GIRLS, third term Jor
summer session, one block from
League, opposite Rackham Build-
ing. 917 F. Huron, phone 8671.
381c
SHOWS DAILY at
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Last Times Today!.

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Opera glasses, black case
with Constance Plaut on top.--Re-
ward, call Joanne Cohen. 2-2591.
382c
LOST-Mortarboard pin with "Doro-
thy K. Rakestraw, . '41," on the
back. Reward offered. Please call
Eleanor Rakestraw, 2-2543. :375
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis hind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State, 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
TRANSPORTATION
ALLIED VAN LINE', IN . Ln.
distance moving. Call Godlrey's.
6927. 410 N. Fifth Ave. 350c
PASSENGERS WANTED- Woman
passenger to Colorado. Leaving
June 5. Dial 2-3307, Miss Rich-
ards. 362c
WANTED TO BUY
CANOE W ANTK . 1'un 4) (1(olnd i-
tin Pone 805 38
CASH for u ed clothiig; me and
ladies. Claude 11. Brown, 512 .,
Main St., phone 2-27:36.
CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD -
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-
ton. Phone fter 6 o'clo(k, 5387.
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY~-~
Pay $5 to $500 for Suits, Overcoats,'
Typewriters, Saxophone, Fur Coats
(Minks and Persian Lambs)',
Watches, and Diamonds. Phone
'am, 5300.
TYPING
1. M. iFYWOOD, CxP( rienc(,d typiSt,
414 Maynard Street, phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-- Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 1942
VOL. L11. No. 169
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
NV.otices
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting of
February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or Summer Session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are ex-
empt, Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day of
classes will be reported to the Cashier
of the University and
"'a r All academic credits will be
withhold. the grades for the semes-
ter or Summer Session just complet-
ed will not be released, and no tran-
scriitof credits will be issued.
" 7IAll students owing such ac-
-'ounts will not be allowed to register
i any subsequent semester or Sum-
mer Session until payment has been
aIc."
nmde.Shirley W. Smith,
Vice President and Secretary.
To the Members of the University
Senate: There will be a meeting of
the University Senate on Monday,
MaY 18, at 4:15 p.m., in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Seniors: The firm which furnishes
diplomas for the University has sent
tihe following caution: Please warn
gradutes not to store diplomas in
cedar cests. There is enough of the
moth-killing aromniatic oil in the av-
erage cedar chest to soften inks of
any kind that might be stored inside
them, resulting in seriously damag-
ing the diplomas.
Shirley W. Smith
Will all those students holding pro-
bationary or special commissions in
the United States Naval Reserve who
r('ect to riv :1Vadi'ree fromntHe
Ulniversityon May 30 please leave
their names at the Information Desk
in the Blisiness Office. We wish to
record this act i i the Commence-
ur'nt Day program.
herbert G. Watkins
Ia 1 rr Noyes Scholarships: Pre-
,IIt holders of these scholarships
who desire to apply for renewals for
1942-43 should call at 1021 Angell
hall and fill out the blank forms for
aoplication for renewal.
Frank E. Robbins
In'orsmation (or Members of 1.5.
Naval Reserve: The Commandant
Nintb Naval District has directed
tlfat ncmmbri's of the Naval Reserve
will not wear uniforms except as
provided by paragraph 20-32, Uni-
form Regulations, U. S. Navy, 1941,
which is herewith quoted: "All mem-

bers of the Naval Reserve, when em-
ployed on active duty, authorized
training duty, with or without pay,
drill, or other equivalent instruction
or duty, or when employed in auth-
orized travel to or from such duty,
or appropriate duty, drill, or instruc-
tion, or during such time as they may
by law be required to perform active
duty, or while wearing a uniform
prescribed for the Naval Reserve,
shall be subject to the laws, regula-
tions, and orders for the government
of the Navy."
I. E, Cassidy,
Captain, U. S. Navy
Staff Travel by Automobile: As a
measure of economy it is requested
that faculty and staff members who
have occasion to travel on Univer-
sity business by personally owned or
University owned automobile report
their plans in advance to the office
of Dr. Frank E. Robbins, Assistant to
the President (Campus telephone
328), in order that, when feasible,
persons going to the same place at
the same time may ride in the same
car and save both tires and expense.
A record of such plans will be kept
in the Presidet 'sOffice, an those
who find it neecssary to make a trip
may inquire there as to the possi-

Senior Engineers: Those who or-
dered commencement announce-
ments may call for their orders to-
day and Thursday, May 13 and 14,
in Room 222 West Engineering Bldg.,
1:00-5:00 p.m. Payments must be
completed on all orders at this time.
This is the only time announcements
will be distributed. There are none
for sale as only enough to fill pre-
vious orders are available.
Faculty of College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts; College of
Architecture and Design; School of
Education; School of Forestry and
Conservation; School of Music; and
School of Public Health: Class lists
for use in reporting grades of under-
graduate students, enrolled in these
units, and also graduate students in
the Schools of Forestry and Conserv-
ation, Music, and Public Health, were
mailed today. Any one failing to re-
ceive theirs should notify the Regis-
trar's Office, Miss Day, 'phone 582,
and duplicates will be prepared for
them.
RoIt. L. Williams,
Assistant Registrar
(c'unInued on Page 4)

Y

MICHIGAN.

One Night
SAT .

May 23

BOX OFFICE SALE NOW*
THE THEATRE GUILD ad THE PLAYWRIGHTS' COMPANY
presei f
HELEN' HAYES
i MAXWELL ANDERSON'S NEW PLAY
sadby.AL.FRED LUNT
ett s by JO MIELZIHAER
PRICES (including tax)
MAIN FLOOR-$3.30, $2.75, $2.20, $1.65
BALCONY-$2.20, $1.65, $1.10

bility of riding with others.
is sabotage.

315 Plymouth Ct., Chicago, II.

Waste

I

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lii

,*
# s
7Ai4 dtAe te/seep4 itt Cottdit4'
He knows that h active pinying days w ast only as
lo"g s h cls ndi Mlw

,

Ii
+
+

AIR RAID SIREN EMITS
LOUDEST WAIL EVER HEARD
Out v the c'wca' ol d itiow iDetroit recently came the
loudest wail ever created by iman. Authorities were testing an
air raid sirei produced by the Bell Telephonc Laboratories.
Observers As far away as eight miles could hear the soun4.
'lw sircp's power rates about 25,000 watts, compared with 50 to
I 00 waits for thec sound eqjuipmuen( in the average theater, The
sound vibratious are so greaut a: to caits a wooden horn on the
siren to overheat and smoke, and the edges of a steel horn will
fray under the same powerful vibrations,
'J[his is anlother of (he m any war'tune products to,be devel=
oped for the Niwional )efcnse R esearch Council by the Bell
Telephone il 1borat'otries, ihere it) scientists and engineers are
dceo iug their ll i1 i to the battle of military research,

r

MICHIGAN

-.AMC *1leV

No matinee today
(lue to installation of new seats.
4(" JAMES
Aw;EY
-I G Nu L

I

help to "p him in excellent physical shap.
You, too, must have the stamino of a baseball player
in your work.
"1 1lt AA n "DVAu 1 1 It 1 ^"1 " m-' ^.Ft . A U' !

i

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111

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