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May 08, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-05-08

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PAGE EO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Jap-Americans
May Continue
StudiesInland
Quaker Committee Takes
Responsibility For New
Program Of Education
PHILADELPHIA. - (AP)-Japanese-
American college students, evacuated
from the Pacific coast, will have a
chance to continue their studies in
inland universities and colleges, the
American Friends service committee
announced today.
Clarence Pickett, executive secre-
tary of the Quaker committee, said
it had accepted responsibility for de-
veloping a program whereby more
than 1,000 Japanese-Americans could
be reestablished in schools on the re-
quest of M. S. Eisenhower, director
of the war relocation authority.
"Deep concern now for the welfare
of loyal American citizens whose par-
ents happened to come from an en-
emy country will pay our democracy
rich dividends in the future," said
Pickett.
"The American people surely do not
wish to deprive fellow citizens of
their birthright to education because
of the accident of race."
Eisenhower said in a letter to the
committee that "it is not feasible"
for the government to undertake the
program "but this in no way detracts
from the desirability of such an ac-
complishment."
Each student will be interviewed
and certified, Pickett said, as a pro-
tective measure for the student, the
university and for the public gen-
erally.
BARGA IN BOOKS'
AHaR-S

Corregidor's Guns Silenced

T

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN!

CLASSIFIE ADVERTISING

Firing in this picture is a big gun on the American stronghold of
Corregidor in the Philippine Islands. The fort's guns are silent now,
following its capture by overwhelming Japanese forces.
Today's Youth Festival Chorus
Merits Praise Of Juva Higbee,

SHOWS DAILY
1-3-5-7-9

at'
P.M.

, riraveaAr fwfsr ryE. rRE

Today and Saturday -
tt ME HER 'A1IEO HE
A IA DT

I

By CLAIRE SHERMAN
Juva Higbee, who has worked for
the past fifteen years with school
children on May Festival concerts,
predicted yesterday that this year's
selection for the Youth Festival
Chorus would prove most successful.
Miss Higbee will direct the Youth
Chorus at 2:30 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium in a concert with the
Philadelphia Orchestra.
"Since the chorus is made up of
children who are principally nine and
ten years of'age and their voices are
still immature," she declared, "it was
necessary to select a song that would
be easy for them to sing and yet
still be interesting and entertaining.
"For that reason, I chose Fletcher's
Walrus and the Carpenter,' a song
that falls well into their vocal range,
and one that tells a story within
their comprehension."
Miss Higbee is especially desirous
that the Chorus' part in the program
be perfect this year since this will
be the last Festival in which she will
have an active part, because of her
retirement at the end of this season.
"Next year I intend to come back
to Ann Arbor and really enjoy the
Festival-from the audience," she
said.
During the fifteen year priiod sdh
Red (ross (otivs"E.
1' feach Nutritiol
A new class in the standard 20 hour
Nutrition course will be offered by
the National Red Cross starting Mon-
day and continuing through July 13.
This is not a cooking class but ra-
ther one designed to promote the
growth of proper food habits and
practices at all income levels through
increased Iwowledge of the facts
about food.
Primarily concerned with a wide-
spread movement in health through
improvement of diets, the course pro-
vides practical training in the selec-
tion of foods, the conservation of
their values and their preparation
into appetizing and nutritious meals.
A standard Nutrition Certificate is
issued to each person by the Na-
tional Red Cross upon completion of
the course.

has taught in Ann Arbor. Miss ,Hig-
bee held the post of Assistant Pro-
fessor of Public School Music, in
which position she has trained teach-
ers to become music supervisors. She
is also known for her work as Super-
visor of Music in the Ann Arbor
public schools.
When Miss Higbee first came to
Ann Arbor, she worked with both
junior high school students and ele-
mentary students, but eight years,
ago she discontinued the junior high
school work in the Festival because
she found it difficult to arrange their
schedule with hers.
Miss Hibee declared, "My first' in-
tention on retiring is to travel
through the south and east for a few
years before I return to my home in
Buffalo, but I shall come back to
Ann Arbor as frequently as possible."
Adult Inst itte
To Meet Here

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1942
VOL. LII. No. 165
Publication in the Daily Oficial
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
University Council: There will be
a meeting of the University Council
on Monday, May 11, at 4:15 p.m., in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
To the Members of the University
Senate: There will be a meeting of
the University Senate on Monday,
May 18, at 4:15 p.m., in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
To All Members of the Faculty and
Administrative Staff: If it seems cer-
tain that any telephones will not be
GM Complies
With Mediation
Board's Order
Corporation Head Yields
To WLB On Question
Of SundayPayments
WASHINGTON, May 7-R)-Gen-
eral Motors Corporation capitulated
today to the War Labor Board's order
for temporary extension of its wage
contract, including Sunday double
time payments.
Charles E. Wilson, white haired
president of a corporation with bil-
lions in war contracts, yielded with
dramatic suddenness at a crowded
and tense public hearing which the
board called after Wilson had tele-
graphed, "We protest and do not
agree to comply," and charged "this
order was based on ex parte consid-
eration."
For more than two hours the pub-
lic and labor members of the tri-
partite board pleaded, denounced and
,cajoled until Wilson receded from
his position of non-compliance. He
said finally his understanding of the
board's intent had been clarified sat-
isfactorily. Chairman William H.
Davis then pressed him for a retrac-
tion of the ex parte charge, asserting
he had led the public to believe the
board conducted a proceeding with
one side represented and not the
other.
"I don't know what an ex parte
hearing is myself," said Wilson
pleading with the chairman not "to
force me to take a position on that
o n e. ,"
"The trouble is," said the chair-
man, "that the American people do
know what an ex parte hearing is
and you don't"
Wilson explained that he did no
mean any unfair advantage had been
taken and he meant no reflection on
the Board; Chairman Davis accepted
the explanation; and the session end-
ed amid applause from Board mem-
bers.
The contract with the CIO United
Automobile Workers which expired
April 28 provided for double time pay
rates for Sunday and holiday work
as such, even when such work wa
within the 40 hour week. In recen
weeks AFL-CIO leaders agreed with
the President to forego those pre
mium rates. A formula was worked
out, and applied by the board recent-
ly in the International Harvester case

used during the summer months,
lease notify theBusiness Office, Mr.
Peterson. A saving can be effected
if instruments are disconnected for
a period of a minimum of three
months. Herbert G. Watkins
To Students Graduating at Com-
mencement, May 30, 1942: The bu-
den of mailing diplomas to members
of the graduating class who do not
personally call for their diplomas
has grown until in 1940 it cost the
University over $400 to perform this
service. The rule has been laid down,
as a result, that diplomas not called
for at the Sports Building immediate-
ly after the Commencement Exercis-
es or at the University Business Of-
fice within three business days after
Commencement will be mailed C.O.D.
The mailing cost will be approximate-
ly 30c for the larger sized rolled
diplomas and 45c for the book form.
Will each graduate, therefoe, be
certain that the Diploma Clerk has
his correct mailing address to insure
delivery by mail. The U. S. Mail
Service will, of course, return all
diplomas which cannot be delivered.
Because of adverse conditions abroad,
foreign students should leave ad-
dresses in the United States, if pos-
sible, to which diplomas may be
mailed.
It is preferred that ALL diplomas
be personally called for.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Assistant Secretary
Commencement Tickets: Tickets
for Commencement may be obtained
on request after May 11 at the In-
formation Desk in the Business
Office, Room 1, University Hall. Be-
cause the Yost Field House will be
used for the exercises, rain or shine,
and because of its limited seating
capacity, only three tickets will be
available for each senior. Please pre-
sent identification card when ap-
plying for tickets.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Assistant Secretary.
Notice to Property Owners: If you
have purchased improved property
on a land contract and owe a bal-
ance in the proximity of 60 per cent
of the value of the property, the
Investment Office, 100 South Wing
of University Hall would be glad t
discuss the possibilities of refinan-
cing your contract through the medi-
um of a mortgage. There are advan-
tages to be had in this manner of
refinancing.
German Tarble for Faculty Members
will meet Monday at 12:10 p.m. ir
the Founders' Room, Michigan Union
Members of all departments are cord-
ially invited. There will be a brie
talk on "Chinesische and Japanische
Schriftzeichen" by Mr. Otto Laporte
Freshmen and Sophomores, Colleg
of Literature, Science; and the Arts
Students who will have freshman o:
sophomore standing at the end of the
present semester and who plan to re-
t turn either for the summer term o:
the fall term should have their clec-
tions approved for the next semeste:
that they expect to be in residence
as soon as possible. There will b
little or no time to sign up returnin
students during the registration peri
ods preceding either of these semes
ters, so it is strongly urged that thi
be taken care of now. You ma
, make an appointment with you
s counselor by telephoning Extensioi
t 613 or by calling at the Office of thi
Academic Counselors, 108 Masoi
- Hall.
Arthur Van Duren, Chairman,
Academic Counselors.
!, (Continued on Page 4)

F

i.
I

FIRST CH lURCH OF

CHRIST, SCIENTIST

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Cordially ini/es you t attend a
FREE LECTURE ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
entilled
SCIRIST IAN ( 11 N(IV; THE DISCOVERY OF LiF ETERNAL
PAUL STARK SEELEY, C.S,B.
PORTlANI), OREGON
AMitir Of the Board of Lectureship of the Mo/her Church
the Firs/ Clurch of Christ, Scientist
in Bis/on, Mass.
MASONIC TEMPLE
SOUTI IoUwrtH AvENUE
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 10, 1942, AT 3:30

CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD--
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-
ton. Phone after 6 o'clock, 5387.
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY-
Pay $5 to $500 for Suits, Overcoats,
Typewriters, Saxophone, Fur Coats
(Minks and Persian Lambs),
Watches, and Diamonds. Phone
Sam, 5300.

MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-I
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
112, 7c
FOR RENT
COTTAGE at Carp Lake, Michigan,
by week, month, or season. Double
garage and boat. Phone 3357.
TWO BEDROOMS, newly decorated
private bath, near University Hos-
pital. References required. Phone
5363. 369c
TRANSPORTATION
ALLIED VAN LINES, INC. Long
distance moving. Call Godfrey's.
6927. 410 N. Fifth Ave. 350c
COUPLE wishes ride to Traverse City
or vicinity early Sunday morning.
Will share expenses. Call Dick at
6056. 371c
PASSENGERS WANTED-Woman
passenger to Colorado. Leaving
June 5. Dial 2-3307, Miss Rich-
ards. 362c
WANTED TO BUY

L. M. HEYWOOD, experienced typist,
414 Maynard Street, phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.,
Careful work at low price. 2c
STUDENTS' BUNDLES WANTED-
6c per lb., rough dry. Shirts extra
10c each. Handkerchiefs, 1c each.
Phone 25-8441. 2905c
HELP WANTED
EXPERIENCE]) COOK to start work
May 20th. Lakelands Golf Club,
Brighton, 6375. 372c
GIRL WANTED for rental library
and sales work. Good salary. Apply
at Follett's Michigan Book Store,
322 S. State St. 358c
YOUNG MAN wanted for retail sell-
ing and stock work. An excellent
opportunity. Apply Follett's Mich-
igan Book Store, 328 S. State St.

TYPING

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Phi Sigma Delta frater ity
pin. Reward. Call Bud, 415 Allen
Rumsey, 2-4401. 370c
FLORISTS
FLOWERS-The way to a girl's heart
is to give her flowers. Be sure her
flowers are from LODI GREEN-
HOUSE. Tel. 25-8374.

',
I'I
.

Exlra -
,SKY PRINCESS"
NEWS OF THE DAY
rLAKE CARRIERS"
READY ON TI1I HIOME 11RONT
Comin: Sunday--
"COURTSHIP OF
ANDY HARDY"
I CHGAN

W 'ar, Edlicalioll

Di)ci ,S I
Issues

The growing mCovniIt towards
adult education will be furthered
next week when the tenth annual
Adult Education Institute is held May
11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 in the Rackham
Building.
Sponsored by the Extension Serv-
ice of the University and the Michi-
gan State Federation of Womnen's
Clubs, the conference will include the
discussion of problems relating to the
war and education. Other topics that
will be in('oIporatfed in the program
are: Literature and book reviews,
classes in parliamentary law, and
foods.
Members of the University faculty
will cooperate to lead round tables
and to give lectures. Plans are also
being made for movies on Latin
America to be shown.
Guest speakers from Lansing, De-
troit and the Michigan State Federa-
tion of Women's Clubs will also ap-
pear on the five-day program.

at?

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4111 1

Support the litter-Fraterilty Council
in their flag-display drivel

4

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AW AMW

THAT'S
BEER

(j' \ot rAw

SI R! 41111 eaCh fld e rY
Alass il iR packed full of satisfying, refreshing
goodness. Your very first taste of genuine old time
iavored Berghoff will add your praise to that of
Ipillirtis of boosters who have been satisfied only

fI CREENE and REVEL I

I

I

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