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May 07, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE 11-lUx

THE MICHIGAN IiAILY

TM3RSDA' F MAY 7, B42

PAGE STX TTWaSnA MAY ~J, I94~
I I I

Senate Forms
Group To Give
Defense Talks
Student Speakers' Bureau
To Offer Information
To Local Organizations
Putting into concrete form the
plans of the old student senate, the
revamped senate has set up a stu-
dent speakers' bureau to provide or-
ganizations in this area with speak-
ers on defense topics.
A subsidiary of the faculty speak-
ers' bureau already in operation and
headed by Dr. Glen E. Mills of the
speech department, the new group
will work under the guidance of Prof.
Kenneth Hance, also of the speech
department.
The student co - chairmen are
Nancy Filstrup, '43, of Zeta Phi Eta
and Norman Schrumway. Miss Fil-
strup was chosen as the representa-
tive of the campus speech societies,
and Schrumway was elected from the
Speech 31 classes.
The bureau has been set up pri-
marily to fill the needs of those or-
ganizations in this area which are
too small to get faculty speakers.
Dr. Hance and the co-chairmen
will allocate speakers to the organi-
zations which need them. The senate
urges all students who are at all in-
terested in becoming speakers for the
bureau to volunteer for such work.
Experience in speaking is not a nec-
essary qualification.
It was stressed by senator Herman
Hudson, '45, that speakers for the
bureau not only would .gain experi-
ence in speaking but. also would be
able to play theirpart in the war
effort. All students interested should
contact Hudson at 2-4726.
The new administrator and his as-
sociate will be announced soon, it
was disclosed by the senate. After
the two senior heads have been
named, selection of the four junior
members of the administrative
branch will -take place.

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HousingPlan
Protest Passed,
ByCty Council
(Continued from Page 1)
with the plan can see that it seems
like a foolish idea." He criticized the
fact that the government wants to
take a piece of "raw land without
any facilities" on which to build a
city while the various facilities of
cities and towns around Willow Run
can be expanded to accommodate the
thousands of defense workers and
their' families.
Waite Asks Refusal
Returning to the floor, Professor
Waite said that although the govern-
ment as yet hasn't issued specific dey
tails as to schools, sewage disposal
and water supply, he believed the
council should refuse to support the
project "as it is now proposed" before
the government goes ahead "and
makes an ungodly mess of the situ-
ation" as it has in other cases.
Alternatives set forth to the fed-
eral government's proposal were, first.
that temporary dwellings be built on
the site of the proposed Huron-Clin-
ton Parkway. After the war these
houses can be torn down and the ter-
ritories can be converted into public
parks and recreational centers, thus
avoiding a "ghost town."
Suggests Expansion
The second suggestion made was
that instead of building a complete
new city of temporary houses, the
government should provide for the
expansion of cities and towns within
the 15 miles radius of the bomber
plant. In this way the water supply
and sewage disposal systems could be
extended to serve the many defense
workers without delay or confusion.
Tracy V. Augur of the Detroit of-
fice of the Federal PublicHousing
Authority who first made known the
government's plans for the Cherry
Hill housing project was invited to
address the council last night but
was unable to attend.
At a meeting here Tuesday repre-
sentatives of Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti
and Washtenaw county disapproved
the bomber plant city.
Mimes Elects Officers
Newly elected officers of Mimes,
men's honorary dramatic society,
are: Bob Sundquist, president; Buck
Dawson, vice-president; Jack Hooper,
treasurer; Ed Tann, secretary, and
Bob Vibbert, librarian.

Courtroom Glamour Girl

Local Red Cross Is Prepared
For Ernergeneies, Smith Says

If disaster should come to any
part of Washtenaw County, the nec-
essary planning and arrangements
have been made to handle the situ-
ation, according to Ira M. Smith,
chairman of the Red Cross Committee
of Disaster Preparedness Relief.
Working directly under the Office
of Civilian Defense and the Wash-
tenaw County Sheriff's Office, where
a' 24-hour a day vigil is kept, the
Red Cross Committee will be able to
provide shelter, food, clothing, trans-
portation and medical aid in a mini-
mum amount of time whenever
needed.
Ready For Disaster
Members of the nine sub-com-
mittees have been chosen from all
parts of the County to investigate and
prepare for some particular sphere
in which action will be required in
the event of disaster. These sub-
committees have eheld regular meet-
ings to plan for any type of disaster
and have devised the methods with
which to handle them.
The sub-committee on Transporta-
tion and Communication has ar-
ranged for the use of ambul ces,
and covered trucks and wreckers of
all kinds. The Red Cross Motor
Corps is constantly on call and ready
for any emergency.
The requisition of food at definite
stores throughout the county has
been arranged by the sub-commit-E
tee on food as well as the preparation
for the cooking of food at places
equipped to handle large quantities.
In the event of a disaster affecting
only a few people, meal tickets at
local restaurants will be given as the
quickest means of taking care of the
situation, but in case of an emergency
affecting large numbers of citizens
the Canteen units expect to have two
complete mobile kitchens ready with
workers to handle the situation.
Schools Available
The Executive Board of the Ma-
sonic Temple has offered the facili-

ties of its building for housing, feed-
ing and air raid shelter. The seven
schools in Ann Arbor and others
throughout the county will also be
ready for use.
Clothing needs of those affected by
disaster will be cared for at local
clothing stores and purchases paid by
the Red Cross. In addition, the sub-
committee on Rescue and Medical Aid
will be ready to supply first aid and
see that all cases needing hospitaliza-
tion are cared for.
The Committee is well-prepared to
serve the community in case of emer-
gency and has been receiving much
aid from the citizens. However, the
Washtenaw County Red Cross Chap-
ter needs 175 more volunteer nurses
aides and at least 100 more volunteer
Canteen Corps to best carry out the
plans of the Disaster Preparedness
Committee.
Defense Affiliation
With Victory Group
RevealedBy Davis
The local chapter of the Committee
to Defend America yesterday an-
nounced through Prof. Bradley M.
Davis, chairman of the executive
council, that it has changed its title
and has affiliated with the newly
organized Citizens For Victory.
Both the local and national Citi-
zens For Victory groups have taken
on the activities of several of the or-
ganizations which without political
affiliation worked for defeat of the
Axis powers in the months which pre-
ceded America's entrance into actual
hostilities.
The program as announced by Pro-
fessor Davis includes advocacy of the
election of effective Congressmen re-
gardless of political affiliation and
support of legislation which will aid
the war effort.

That's what they call Miss Edith
Glennon (above) at the New York
City Federal Building where her
official title is Assistant United
States Attorney.
Michigan Men Eligible
For Union Life Pins
Any male student completing at
least four years of accredited aca-
demic work is eligible to receive his
gold Michigan Union life member-
ship pin, according to Ed Holmburg,
'43, secretary.
The pins entitle the holder to all
the privileges of the Union after
leaving the campus. This includes
use of the pool, bowling alleys, Pen-
dleton library, billiards room and
permission yto cash checks at the
Union whenever desired.
Seniors who attempt to obtain
these pins after a year from this
graduation date will be forced to pay
$50 for life membership.
The pins may be obtained by call-
ing for them between 3 and 5 p.m.
at the Michigan Union business of-
fice on the basement floor any after-
noon this week.
I, -

Jer /ig
FLOWERS

Make Mother's own day com-
pletely happy by giving her
a carefully arranged bouquet
or a lovely corsage.
Don't Forget
Mother . .
CHELSEA
FLOWER SHOP
203 East Liberty
Phone 2-5616

Wars and priorities may stump
some industries, but there is one pro-
duction staff that can laugh at the
WPB and the University's accelerated
program.
At this moment smooth colorful
pages of the 1942 Michiganensian are
whirring through the presses of the
Ann Arbor Printing Company, a
month ahead of schedule for re-
lease around May 14.
War Is Theme
Climaxing months of hard work,
the 'Ensian staff is rushing the last
pages of the new year book to the
printers, and about three-quarters of
the book is already in print. As the
pages emerge from the presses and
are gradually assembled, the theme
of the war and its influence on cam-
pus life is apparent. Joe Rookie, the
typical college soldier boy, sprawls
throughout the book in pen and ink
sketches. A large section is devoted to
complete coverage of the ROTC and
NROTC units, including pictures of
maneuvers at Camp Custer.
The 'Ensian cover, now being made
at Kingsport, Tenn., also shows the
influence of army camps, for the
dominating color is the army brown.
The all-over design, by Bob Nickle,
is an inovation from the usual year-
book cover.
Special Color Printing
Colors-tan, green, yellow orange
and blue, all pastel-stand out on the
'Ensian pages as they come through
the press. A special process is needed
in color printing, for though the ma-
chine prints the black and two colors
in one rapid revolution, colored ink
takes longer to dry. An automatic
machine is needed to spray liquid on
Price To Present
CarillonProgram
Percival Price, University carillon-
neur, will present a recital of English
music in his concert which will be
held at 7:15 p.m. today.
Professor Price will feature a selec-
tion of William Wooding Starmer,
who lectured on the science of car-
illon building at the University of
Birmingham, and also a number by
Clifford Ball,
The concert will be opened with
the Recessional and will be followed
by a collection of English folk songs.
The rest of the program will consist
of Starmer's "Introduction, air, and
variations," a group of Celtic folk
songs, Ball's "Dance impromptu,"
and "Rule Britannia."

I

each sheet to crystallize the ink and
form a glistening, drying surface over
the page.
When the pages have been printed,
cut and sewed at the Ann Arbor
Printing Company, they will be sent
to Chicago, to be put together and
placed in the covers. When the 'En-
sian is distributed it will have taken
a round trip to three cities-Kings-
ports, Chicago and back to Ann Ar-
bor. It will have brought under one
cover more than 700 pictures of cam-
pus views, University scenes and or-
ganizations. It will also have brought
to its readers a representation of
University war efforts and the in-
fluence of world wide problems on
the Michigan campus.
I_-

take '
easy.0
W'hy study when you
are hot and bothered?
- However, if you are
one of those pwopiler wVho
REALLY ought to cram,
-- and who shouldn't
- do it the right way
in our cool, fresh sum-
mer P.j.'s.
She VA i

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FLATTER ou

hey FIT

QjOu

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of fine quality
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For girls in slacks, for girls in
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So popular, and easy to wear.
White Beige
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Sunny Blue Red
Navy Brown
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CICLLR
Here's the secret of that super-
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And to top it all, this fashion of
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washes, never wrinkles, sags or stretches.

1942
Dramatic Season
OPENING
MONDAY NIGHT

--W-A

.l co on

8 Nickels Arcade

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7 ~w
k l {'"-

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.

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THE BIGGEST
SELECTION IN TOWNt

I

"5
G ti
G

FRANCIS LEDERER
in
S. N. Behrman's witty modern play
N TTIlMF

I

11

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