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April 29, 1942 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Michigan

Nine

Wins

Close

Decision

From

Spartans, 24

Varsity Capitalizes On Four
State Errors For Both Runs,
Boin, Cain Stage Pitching Duel With Spartan Hurler
Baseball Team To Face Notre Dame Today

(Continued from Page 1)w wild peg to first. Robby
the spectators to their
replaced him in the seventh to save as he went wild on th
him for the coming two-game series he broke for secondo
with the University of Indiana this pitch to Chamberlain
weekend. It was Boim's second vic- throwbby three steps.
tort'of te seson.pitch Robby headedf
tory of the season, beat the throw and w
'Pro' and Bill had their trouble at baseman. Nick Picciut
times during the game. However, the roll into left field, Do
crafty were good in the pering in with what pr
ysophomores winning run.
pinches as they left 11 Spartan run- Michigan almost sc
ners stranded on the base paths. the frame when Cham
Davey Nelson started things rolling and Bob Stenberg sing
for the Wolverines in the first inning Chamberlain was pick
as he reached second when Bob An- when he turned and
dreoli, Michigan State shortstop, back in time. Stenberg
threw wild to first. Don Holman sac- Christenson at second
rificed the 'Mite' down to third and the inning by fanning.
Robinson struck out. Bud Chamber- The Spartans tried
lain stepped into the batter's box. the count in the closii
and the fans remembering how the fine fielding by the i
scrappy third baseman had been hit- which turned in two
ting in the last week were yelling for kept the State runne
a hit. Bud failed to hit, but the State home.
first baseman, Joe Nelson, let the
ball pop out of his glove and Nelson
came home as Chamberlain went Comedy OfJ
down to second. Christenson ended
the inning by fanning. MICHIGAN (2) AB
State Threatens In Second
State threatened to tie the game Nelsn, cif.......3
up in the second inning when it got Robinson,s. .,....4
two men on, but Boim managed to Chamberlain. 3b. 3
retire the side without any runs. In Christenson, 2b. .. 2
the fourth frame the Spartans push- stenberg, 2b 2
ed across its only run when Nelson White, rf. 3
singled to left center after the first Boor lb..4
man had grounded out. Wy Davis Harms c.........4
popped a foul fly which Capt. George ar .
Harms took in for the second out Boim, p..g.......1
and Andreoli was given a free pass Cain, p..........0
to first base. Pitcher Skrocki then _
came up and knocked a single into Totals ........ 31
right field to score Nelson from sec-
ond, when Paul White fielded the - STATE (1) AB
ball slowly and there was no play -
at the plate on the runner. Pellerin, rf. ...... 3
Robinson Scores Cioleck .......... 1
In the fifth inning speedster Don Picciuto, 3b....... 5
Robinson put on a display of his Will Davis, 2b. ... 3
talent to give Michigan its winning Fornari, c. ....... 5
margin. Robby reached first when La Due, cf. ....... 4
Andreoli broke loose with another Nelson, lb. ....... 4
Wy Davis, lf...... 1
Andreoli, ss....... 3
.4J / Skrocki, p.,......3

y then biought
collective feet
he bases. First
on the second
and beat the
On the next
for third. He
when the third
o, let the ball
n came scam-
roved to be the
(ored again in

Links Squad
Stars To Miss
Big Ten Tilts
By BUD LOW
Coach Ray Courtright will probably
be without the services of two varsity
lettermen when the Wolverine links-
men meet Purdue and Indiana re-
spectively on their last out of town
matches this coming weekend. Bob
Fife and Dave Osler will not make
the trip with their teammates be-
cause they must stay behind and
make up some back work.
Although a little dismayed that he
will not have his team at full strength
for the opening Conference match
against Purdue on Saturday and

berlain walked against Indiana the following Mon-
led to left, but day, "Corky" expressed great satis-
:ed off second faction about the way the squad has
could not get unproved recently. "The boys have
g had replaced been hitting their shots much better
. White ended and with most everyone consistently
shooting in the seventies the team
hard to knot is coming right along," Courtright re-
ag innings butated. Five To Make Trip
ifi ldl rnnt FieTtae rg.

Netmen Expect
ToughCombat
WithSpartans
Wolverines Face Second
Match With State Today
Lineup Still Uncertain
(Continued from Page 1)
Johnson gave best proof of the even-
ness of the match. Behind 7-8 in the
third set and at match point, John-
son evened up the set and went on
to win the set and match, 14-12. With
State out for revenge, the Wolverines
are going to have to be at their peak
if they wish to maintain their win-
ning streak.
Lineups Uncertain
Neither lineup is yet certain and
Weir has yet to decide who will play!
his number two doubles. It is certain
however, that the Hammett-Stille
duo will start at the one slot and
the singles lineup will probably be
the one which has been used all sea-
son. For State it will probably be
Captain Beeman, Bill Maxwell, and
Kline in the top three singles brack-
ets.
ODDS AND ENDS: Light has fin-
ally been thrown upon that elusive
Purdue match of Saturday which the
Varsity won, 6-1 ... Purdue was short
of men and consequently there was
no number six singles or three dou-
bles . . . As Wayne Stille was calledI
Saway suddenly to Chicago Gerry
Schaf lander, Gamon, and Johnson
each moved up a notch . . .
Coach Weir expressed himself as
very satisfied with the weekend trip
but is still bothered by the one and
two doubles positions . . . In the Pur-
due match a newcomer, sophomore
Fred Wellington, took over Stille's
place in the top doubles slot ---
Schaflander played what was from
the spectators standpoint the best
match Saturday . .. After losing the
first set to Bill Stettner and behind
2-5 in the second set he came back
to win the set 8-6 and then went on
to win the match.
Browns Down New York
NEW YORK, April 28.-- )-The
St. Louis Browns ended their nine-
game losing streak today with a 3 to
1 decision over the New York Yan-
kees.

" Just Sentiment
* Future Policy

27ENCHCOMnIER

11y BUD ENDEL, Daily Sports Editor

i Lei quarf eL,
double plays.
rs away from
Errors

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that, we can never thank them
enough.

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12

Along with the usual reliable trio
composed of Ben Smith, Chan Si-
monds, and Captain John Leidy, two
others will probably make the trip.
These will undoubtedly be Bill Stew-
art and Bill Courtright who will be
playing in the places of "Hollywood"
Fife and senior Dave Osler.
Bill Stewart To Play
Monday afternoon the two Bills-
Courtright and Stewart-played off
an eighteen hole round to determine
their positions. The match was de-
cided on the eighteenth green when
Courtright needed only to sink an
eight foot putt to card an eagle three
and tie the count. He missed, and
with it went the honor of playing
fourth for the varsity this weekend.
. Captain Leidy gave proof that he
is definitely an improved golfer when
he shot a two under par 70 in prac-
tice yesterday, while Ben Smith card-
ed a 71 on Monday. With two more
days in which to practice before
they leave Friday morning, the tra-
veling squad should be in top shape
for their first Big Ten match of the
season.

FIRST COLUMNS are like last
columns. The writer, whoever
he may be, doesn't want to saturate
he type with sentiment or over-
flood the lines with wordy pictures
of his mingled emotions. And yet
few are the columnists who can re-
refrain from doing just that in their
first and final efforts.
We aren't going to try to be dif-
ferent in that respect. Our last stint
of THE BENCHCOMBER will prob-
ably be as disjointed with conflicting
feelings as this, our first column,
despite the year of experience that
will lie between the two.-
Somehow, we can't help but feel
sentimental. Three years of en-
joyable and hard work have left
an impression which will never be
forgotten, and which we never
want to forget. They have been
years full of surprise and anxiety,
fulfilled hopes and disappoint-
ments, successes and dismal fail-
ures, praise and deserving criti-
cisms. In short, they have been
the greatest cumulative part of our
college life, and now that we have
finally reached the goal for which
those years have molded us, we
can't forget them.
BUT MOST FIRMLY fixed in our
memory are those faces and per-
sonalities with whom we worked and
who guided us through those three'
years. Behind those faces and per-
sonalities lie individuals and associ-
ations too rich in experience and
advice, forming a bond too strong not
to deserve memory and mention.
There was genial Herb Lev, who
was in charge of us during our
freshman period. Then came Don
Wirtchafter and his staff composed
of Hal Wilson, Art Hill, Woody Block,
Norm Miller, Gene Gribbroek and
Hoe Seltzer. All of them were ever
willing to aid with valuable advice
and equally valuable criticism. For

And most memorable is this last
year under the leadership of our
predecessor, Hal Wilson. To you,
Hal, we sincerely say gnat we hope
we can do half the job that you
did. We will forever be indebted
to you for all you have taught us
and for all the enjoyment you have
caused us. Your ideais of fairness
and justice will always he a pin-
nacle for us to attain.
Not to be forgotten are the men
with whom we worked on an equal
plane during the past year-Mike
Dann, Dick Simon, Bob Stahl, Hoe
Seltzer and Stan Clamage. The
wealth of friendship which they
represent, we wish never to lose.
THROUGHOUT the coming year
we shall try to practice all of the
axioms we have been taught. Both
Mike Dann, associate sports editor,
and the writer of this column shall
strive to maintain the friendly rela-
tionships which have been so well
established with the coaching staff.
No university can boast of a better-
rounded staff, and to its members
we offer a sincere appreciation of
being privileged to serve them and
to know them.
Our policy on the sports page
shall be to present those things
which we believe you, the reader,
want to see there. Our aim in the
columns shall be to print those
things which we feel belong there,
from the standpoint of news and
interest value. We heartily invite
any criticism that you may have to
offer on the page play and column
items. It is our job to publish
sports for the benefit of the reader
and Michigan athletics in gen-
eral, and we earnestly desire your
comments.
If space permits, national news
nnri iiL1iin iiin ajhnnna ina i ll WILL

Cinder Squad
To Meet Illini
HereSaturday
Performances At Drake
Show Michigan Squad
At Peak For Contest
By ED ZALENSKI
Keyed to a high pitch after their
singular performance at the Drake
Relay carnival last weekend, the
Maize and Blue trackmen were ready
to meet the onslaught of an invading
Illinois cinder squad Saturday after-
noon at Ferry Field.
This dual meet will mark the first
and only home outdoor appearance
of Varsity Coach Ken Doherty's
Michigan track and field forces this
season.
Out For Twelfth Straight
A victory Saturday will make it
twelve straight over the visiting Illini,
a streak that started back in 1930.
The Wolverines have topped the Illini
seventeen times in twenty-four dual
meets.
If their showing at Des. Moines in
the Relays is any criterion, the Maize
and Blue cindermen should present
a formidable front against Illinois.
Few Michigan fans realize that the
Wolverines would have copped a
first-place tie with Ohio State at
Drake had the Butler Relay scoring
system been used. This is a definite
indication of the Maize and Blue's
all-around power and balance.
Varsity Approaches Peak
There is no doubt that the Michi-
gan men are approaching the peak
of their outdoor conditioning, as evi-
denced at Drake when eleven of the
trackmen chalked up the top per-
formances of their careers.
Outstanding was the :47.5 quarter
of "Hose Nose" Bob Ufer in the sprint
medley in which the Maize and Blue
set a new Michigan record of 3:23.9.
Captain Al Piel and sophomore Lenny
Alkon hit 21.5 seconds in the 220-
yard dash and smooth-striding Dave
Matthews breezed through his fast-
est half-mile, 1:53.2.
Buel Morley, who was clocked in

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t

INTRAMURAL
Sport Shots
By AL STEINMAN

u

Reveals Strong
Backfield Pliy
,r ,

By KEV JONES
Head Coach Fritz Crisler's squad
of gridders, undaunted by weather!
that has been making even the on-
lookers wish for a swimming pool,!
have been brewing a potion of trouble
for Michigan's grid opponents next
fall.
Yesterday's workout, on the same
old Ferry Field practice gridiron,
consisted of running through plays,
with the emphasis on offense. Most
stressed during the afternoon was
the blocking in the line, with which
the coaches seemed dissatisfied.
Backfield Is Strong
Biggest news from the spring prac-
tices is the apparent depth in the
backfield. With most of last year's
returning regular backfield lost to
the other spring sports, the field is
left to freshmen behind the line can-
didates, and they are showing up to
good advantage.
With at least two men in every
ball-carrying position as well as two
quarterbacks to back up Captain
George Ceithaml, who has been do-
ing his usual good job throughout the
spring, the frosh bid fair to give last
year's backfield a run for its money.
Wiese Paces Frosh
Leading the list of yearlings is full-
back Bob Wiese, who in yesterday's
scrimmage showed his usual work by
driving through for gains consistently.
However, Bob is not alone in the
line-bucking position. Don Lund of
Detroit having shown that he will
be in there pitching when the time
comes to play for keeps.
Halfbacks Bob Chappius and Pat
Keefe are the most likely looking
passers to be seen, and both can
turn on the speed on occasion, Chap-
pius getting away for long gains sev-
eral times yesterday, and Keefe giv-
ing a good account of himself.
Bill Keenan and Warren Yaap add
to the list of halfbacks, with Bob
Vernier and George Kiesel filling the
quarterback post. However, these last
two will probably have to wait a year
before having a shot at the varsity
post.
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Member Assn. of American Law Schools
rnmu ti nf Two Vears of College Work

Totalsm........32182474i
SUMMAN~RIESj
Runs Batted In: Michigan 0, StateE
Skrocki 1; Doubles: Boor 1; StolenI
Bases: Robinson 2, Stenberg 1; Sac-
rifices: Holman 1, Wy Davis 1; Left
on Base: Michigan 6, State 11; Walks
off Boim in 6 innings 3, Cain in 3
innings 3, Skrocki 3; Hits off Boim in
6 innings 5, Cain in 3 innings 3,
Skrocki 6; Double Plays: Cain to
Stenberg to Boor, Robinson to Sten-
berg to Boor; Winning Pitcher: Boim;I
Umpires: Crain and Andrews.
Cards Beat Giants
ST. LOUIS, April 28.-iP)-Johnny
Hopp, who had been held hitless in
four earlier chances, banged a sting-
ing double through second baseman
Mickey Witek in the tenth inning to-
day to score Terry Moore from sec-
ond and give the St. Louis Cardinals
a 5 to 4 victory over the New York
Giants.

The crucial games which will de-
termine the winners in the fraternity
and residence hall leagues are be-
ginning this week for the Greek let-
ter men, and next week for the dorms.
Kappa Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon,
Theta Chi. Phi Delta Theta. Pi Lamb-
da Phi and Phi Kappa Sigma have
already qualified for the first place
playoffs, and they will be joined in
a day or so by two other teams to
be chosen from a playoff involving
five fraternities. The games will be-
gin today and should be well under
way by the end of the week provid-
ed the weather continues to be favor-
able.
The residence halls are finishing
their regularly scheduled games this
week, and should be ready to start
the playoffs by next Monday. The
race to determine which teams will
vie for the championships is still
wide open and many outfits are In
the running.

AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB 'W L Pet. GB
Cleveland ......10 3 .769 Brooklyn.......12 3 .800
New York .......9 4 .692 1 Pittsburgh.......8 5 .615 3
Detroit ........10 6 .625 1 New York .......7 7 .500 41%
Boston .........8 5 .615 2 Chicago.........7 7 .500 4%/
Washington .... 6 9 .400 5 St. Louis ........6 6 .500 4%
St. Louis ........6 10 .375 5'' Boston ........7 8 .467 5
Philadelphia . .. 5 10 .333 6 Cincinnati.... ..5 8 .386 6
Chicago ......3 10 .231 7 Philadelphia ... 3 11 .214 8%/
Tuesday's Results Tuesday's Results
Boston 6, Detroit 1 Brooklyn 7, Cincinnati 3
Washington 4, Chicago 3 Boston 6, Chicago 3
Cleveland 6, Philadelphia 4 Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 1
St. Louis 3, New York 1 St. Louis 5, New York 4 (10 in.)

ana iurai penmgs wnre-
ceive a bigger play than heretofore. :49.6 for the fastest 440-yard dash of
At all costs, we shall try to bring youg his life, will probably not start
the results of the bigger nationwide against Illinois due to a spike wound
events. in his left calf suffered at Drake.
W E HOPE we can write with satis-
faction in our next emotional Red Sox Down Detroit
outburst, our last column, when we BOSTON, April 2.-P)--The Red
shall review the fulfillment and frseat Detroia series, with Jimmy
shortcomings of the policy we have Foxx unloading his second homer of
established. And we hope you like it. the season with one on in the third.
It Th

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