100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(

~WO

THE MICHIGA N DAILY

Meteorologist
To Give Talk
Technologist Will Discuss
New Scientifie Methods
At Iackham _Gathering
Rosshy Is Authority
Dr. Carl G. Rossby of the Institute
of Meteorology, University of Chi-
cago, will lecture on "Recent Devel-
opments in the Science of Meteor-
ology" at 4:15 p.m. Thursday in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Sponsored by the Departments of
Astronomy, Geography,.and Gelogy,
Dr. Rossby is one of the best known
theoretical meteorologists in the
country, and an excellent practical
meteorologist as well.
Worked Under Bjkernes
Born and educated in Sweden, Dr.
Rossby worked under B. V. Bkernes
as a junior meteorologist on the west
coast of Norway. During the first
World War Dr. Rossby was in charge
of the meteorological service of Nor-
way. And when Norway was cut off
from the rest of the world, Dr. Ross-
by, working theoretically, studied the
northern storms and came to the
conclusion that there is a definite
difference between northern and
southern air currents.
In 1923, after working with the
Swedish Government Service, Dr.
Rossby came to the United States
where he became chairman of the
Daniel Guggenheim Institute of Aer-
onautical Meteorology. He later es-
tablished the first meteorological
service for an air line between San
Francisco and Los Angeles.
When the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology opened a department
of meteorology in 1928, Dr. Rossby
joined the faculty as an associate
professor and head of the depart-
ment. He also served as a research
associate at the Woodshole Institute
of Oceanology, specializing in turbu-
lance work.
Given Reed Award
Dr. Rossby was given the Reed
Award by the American Institute of
Aeronautical Sciences in 1934, and
in 1941 was appointed director of the
Institute of Meteorology at Chicago
University.
In addition to this work, Dr. Ross-
by is assistant chief of the United
States Weather Bureau and is con-
nected with the training of meteor-
ologists for the Weather Bureau.
The majority of his work has been
as a theoretical meteorologist, study-
ing the polar areas and atmospheric
turbulance.
DON'T MISS IT!
..I-gI

Stutz Gives Funds From RW. Drive

c
t.
,
r
t
}C
L
AC
C
t
T
I
t
X
S
,"
1
S
:
1
,

Chairman of the student Russian War Relief unit, Harry Stutz,
Grad., is shown at the RWR's "United Nations Victory Rally" last Sat-
urday at Detroit's Olympia, presenting former ambassador Joseph E.
Davies (cepter) with $250 collected in a two-week campus drive. This
brings the total of University contributions so far this year up to $1,050,
$950 shy of their goal.
Rev. Elmore lMgKee, of the Board of Directors of RWR (left) and
Mme. Litvinoff, wife of Russia's ambassador (right), look on.
Prof. Ed ward Young Heads
Aerial Photography Class

Women's Field Army Begins
A iiuial Drve Agaist Caneer
Continuing its light against (an- treatment saying that "cancer is be-
cer, the Ann Arbor division of the ing treated every day," but that de-
Women's Field Army of the Amen- lay, ignorance and fear have caused
canl Society for the Control of Can- the needless death of thousands who
c re S opened its annual campaign. could have been saved Iy knowledge
According to Mrs. II. Marvin Pal- and prompt action.
lard. commander of the local unit, The only known methods of curing
the ."three-pronged fight against cancer are by surgery, X-rays and
Fear, Deay and Ignorance, the chief radium, and even these must be used
allies of cancer," will feature a lec- in the early stages of the disease to
ture in the Rackha nAuditorium by be effective. Dr. Kemper emphasized
S. L. A. Marshall, Detroit News war that pain is a late symptom and "the
commentator. In addition, Dr. F. J. fact that a person feels well, even
Hodges, head of the roentgenology though he has some non-painful
department of the University Hos- symptoms, means nothing."
:ital, will give a radio address, "War Wym hths, gan , "Fig. a
News On the Cancer Front," April 11. With the slogan, Fight Cancer
Ns Oian eance Fn ," Ain 1 y'hrough Knowledge," the Women's
Solicitation of fund.s will continue Army is striving to, free men and
throughout the whole of April, con- women from their old fears by tell-
trol-of-cancer month, and -will be ing the truth about cancer and its
carried on through a canvass of the cure. They are attempting to show
city's business districts and through that cancer is curable and is being
special donations. Canisters will be cured, but that such chances dimin-
placed in the local schools and club ish rapidly with the passing of each
gifts will be accepted from various month.
women's organizations,
Proceeds from last year's cam-
paign, which amounted to $1,225, and Fiv e Prof essors
those from the year before, $1,550, Hs if e
were donated to the two local hos- -ossHats In R g
pitals. This year contributions will
again be given the hospitals, and the For City Positions1
remainder will be sent to the state j
and national headquarters of the So-
ciety for research, clinics, and edu No ivory-towered academicians are
cation. Michigan professors whose varied ac-
Dr. J. W. Kemper has emphasized tivities take them into most of the
the need for adequate protection walks of life and even into the by-
irom this disease, which is the na- paths of politics, because in the an-
tion's second highest cause of death. nual Ann Arbor city election which
He particularly stressed the impor- will take place Monday five instruc-
tance of early diagnosis and prompt tors from as many different schools
and colleges have tossed their hats
into the ring.
Caplan 01iiI itite Each of Ann Arbor's seven wards
will elect one supervisor, one alder-
!rrtg( ;re Rotat ofls man and one constable. For alder-
fI mandin the first ward Prof. Lewis G.
L e cltu e s At H1ile(4 Vander Velde of history department
is the Democratic candidate who op-
First of a series of forum-lectures poses the Republicans' choice, Her-
on marriage relations, "Problems of man Allmendinger. The race for
the Unmarried," will be discussed by alderman in the sixth ward will be
? Dr. B. Bernard Caplan, psychiatrist between two University men, Prof.
of the Children's Center in Detroit, John L. Brumm (Dem.) of the jour-
at 8:15 p.m. Monday at Hillel Foun- nalism department and Prof. Arthur
dation. D. Moore (Rep.), instructor of elec-
Youth's psychological problems trical engineering. Also, in this same
and adjustment will be analyzed in ward Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, direc-
the lecture. Following the lecture a tor of the Health Service, is running
discussion and question period will be unopposed on the Republican ticket
held, for supervisor, a position on the
Holding a position of psychiatrist, county legislative body. Both Pro-
Dr. Caplan was on the staff of Toledo fessor Moore and Dr. Forsythe are
State Hospital before assuming his incumbents.
present position. At present he is This year a candidate for one of
directing the Marriage Clinic of Tem- the city offices will again come from
plc Beth El in Detroit in addition to the School of Forestry and Conserva-
his other work. tion. Perhaps emulating his col-
Marriage lectures have been a reg- league-in-education, Mayor Young,
ilar and popular feature of Hillel's Prof. Shirley W. Allen, instructor of
pr'ogirams in past years. Speakers forestry, is running for the position
with authoritative knowledge have of alderman in the seventh ward.
'omprelensively lectured on the Professor Allen, however, is a can-
problen5i of marriage. didate on the Democratic ticket.

CLASSIFIED
III E CTIOn
CLASSIFIED
ADI)VERTIS ING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In--
crease of 10c for each
add itional 5 words.).
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for I
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
TYPING
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
LAUNDERING

FLORISTS
FLOWERS-The,. way to a girl's
heart is to give her flowers. Be
sure her flowers are from LODI
GREENHOUSE, Tel. 25-8374.
WANTED TO BUY
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude I. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 5C
CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD-
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-
ton. Phone after 6 o'clock, 5387.
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500. Phone
Sam, 5300. 229c
FARMS FOR SALE
20 ACRES-4 miles, good road. Nice
building spot. Some old material,
$12,500. Terms-Farley, 2-2475.
TAILORING and SEWING
STOCKWELL and Mosher-Jordan
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678. 3c

I

New Course Trains Men
For Photography' Work
And Moasic Construction
By H. J. SLAUTTERBACK
As aerial photography assumes new
war-time importance, the University
meets the need for trained techni-
cians in this field with a special de-
fense course.
Pointing to the separate photo-
graphic division of the national air
corps, Prof. Edward Young, of the
geodesy department, director of the
course said in a recent interview that
modern war strategy is dependent to
a tremendous extent upon photo-
graphic maps and mosaics. "It is al-
most impossible for the average ci-
vilian to know how important this
behind the lines function has become
in the years since the first World
War," he said.1
Importance Noted
"We must locate the enemy, detect
their camouflage devices and plan
our own troop movements through
the use of aerial photography."
When asked to explhin methods
used to correlate and interpret pho-
tographs made from the air, Pro-
fessor Young said that two methods
of correlation are commonly used.
"Very often," he said, "the photo-
graphs are used to prepare common
topographical maps which are fam-
iliar to any stuident of geography."
These are used primarily to plan
troop movements and to determine
strategy.
Professor Young explained, how-
ever, that the photographs are more
frequently used as mosaics, to show
the actual contour of the land as
well as placement of factories, air-
ports, or enemy fortifications. "It is
these mosaics which are used to de-
tect camouflage tactics," he said.
Special Equipment Used
For interpretation of mosaics spec-
ial stereographic equipment has been
perfected. "Aerial cameras are now
often equipped to make double ex-
posures at slightly different angles
so that the two views necessary for

stereoscopic use can be taken simul-
taneously." Professor Young added.
He said that the methods used in
photographing from the air are so
varied and depend so muchlupon spe-
cial conditions and needs that an ex-
planation of any single technique is
impossble. However, he explained
that photographs are usually taken
at intervals of a few seconds, and

i
y
:
1

Your tailor takes this op-
,portunity to wish you all
a Happy Easter,
CAMELET
TA I LORS
1119 South U

LAUNDRY - 2-1044.
Careful work at low

Sox darned.
price. 2c

that they often o
sixty per cent.
"Overlap is ne
Young explained,
of the icture are
by the angle at x
taken that only tY
ture can be used.
Hillel T
Vote

verlap as much as
cessary," Professor
because the sides
so badly distorted
hicle they must b
he heart of the pic-
o Hold
rf'jda

I'rejen ty " +r
Mr. S. L.A. MARSmHALL
War COMMENTATOR for the Detroit News
Speaking on

IN THE NEWS"
ON THE SCREENI

r

-r

,p,.:,.rr r
'4 G % rlA
f. o rj ..,
'./ / . / ii ;

Annual Election Tho Dcidt
Student Councilnwn
Annual elections for Hillel Foun-
dation Student Council positions will
be held Tuesday with voting at the
Foundation and Lane Hall.
Preferential balloting on the list of
candidates drawn up by the Student
Council will be the method of selec-
tion. Petitions for additional nomi-
nationnsmay be obtained t the Foun-
dation.
Nominees include Laura l3aird, '43,
June Chariton, '43Ed, Al Cohen, '44,
Stuart Goldfarb, '45E, Syril Greene,
'43, Sybil Wofsey. 43, Charlotte
Kaufman, '43, Heib Levin, '44M, Hy
Sterngold, '44E, Merv Pregulman,
'44, Elleanor Press. '43, and Julian
Stern, '44.
Ftr'ther nominces inc lld(lc I ,ewis
Warner, '45E, Jim Weinstein, '44, ois
Arnold, Harold Cooper, '44, Janet
Crone, '43, Gloria Donen, '43, Sam
Rosen, '44, Norm Schwartz, '44, Dan
Seiden, '43, Netta Siegel, '45, Bennet
Yanowitz, '44, Paul Mishkin, '44, Herb
Edelhertz, '43, Grace Freudberg, '45,
Elyse Gitlow, '44, and Warren
Laufe, '44.

I

f

I

R

i t/ ('lace /i the w ap a
Rackhan Auditorium 8:15 P.M. Tues., April 21
Proceeds to Women's Field Army for Control of Cancer
Tickets 50c (tax included)

I

f ;

t
ti
,;
i
i
.

Ca mpus Drug Presents
LAST-MINUTE EASTE
Sug
* WHITMAN'S fine Easter Candies
s* IMPORTED wines and liquors
* FILMS to record happy holiday scenes
* FANCY ICE CREAMS for
Easter Desserts
' COss
2 1
ORSC
.. PER tiU 5

e0o"

__e...

4

11

R

GIFT

gestions

D'ORSAY
CtORSAY ;
VORSAY

.1

I

3

11

4I

IlIargarul
LOCKWOOD
REDGiRV'E

11

a, MAY WHITT.Y
Pknctd y
AE ED IIICCOPK
ASIL 1C TS
MOST
N 1 ILL 1Ncw
r/A . o;. A~i rI

No bunny ever brought a more
delightful Easter gift than this:
Five famous d'Orsay odeurs in
individual Easter eggs-your
choice of lovely s1.25
pastel shades ...
Three in .a handsome
gift box for $3.75.

AiL

3

I

1 '~ Coil Qk'; 11
rt, , .... 'i c
r\(V Y c r.Aitk) shenyo
col' uty3Ct Fr

N

05
MS REPiv eerFUME.

r
' ONE OUNCE

Don't

Because the rare ingredients (and the costly Lalique bottles)
for this precious perfume are no longer available, D'Orsay
is offering its small remaining stock in American flacons

Forget

at this unheard-of price. Come today-befrce it vanishes!

Dad

i

i

I I

G

I'll

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan