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April 03, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I I
U,

Annual Cancer
Drive Will Run
Through April
Radio Address, Lecture
To Highlight Campaign
To Eliminate Disease
Ann Arbor's division of the Wom-.
en's Field Army for the Control of
Cancer, under the leadership of Mrs.
H. M. Pollard, commander, has an-
nounced its plans for the annual
Cancer Control drive.
With the advent of April, control-
of-cancer month, the drive will take
on added force and will feature in its
program a radio address by Dr. F. J.
Hodges, head of the roentgenology
department of University Hospital.
He will discuss "War News on the
Cancer Front."
As a special attraction for citizens
of Ann Arbor the Women's Field
Army will present S. L. A. Marshall,
Detroit News war commentator at a
lecture April 21 in the Rackham
Building.
Special guests include Mrs. Fred-
ericka Walden and Mrs. A. C. Fur-.
stenberg. Mrs. John Sheldon will
handle the business end of the drive,
Mrs. W. H. Mack, Women's Clubs,
"Mvrs. Alfred Lee, Schools, and Mrs.
W. Brace Craig is in charge of tick-
ets.
The drive will continue through
the month of April under the aus-
pices of the Women's Army. In the
past two years it has given a thous-
and dollars to the two Ann Arbor hos-
pitals with profits from the drive.

Entry Deadline
For Hopwood
Contest Is Set
Only ten days left to finish up
manuscripts destined for the Hop-
wood literary competition, warns
Prof. Roy W. Cowden, Director of
the Hopwood Room. Entries must
be handed in by 4:30 p.m. April 13,
in Room 3221 Angell Hall.
The Hopwood contest, offering
more prize money than any other
university in the world in the field
of writing, originated in the 1922 will
of Avery Hopwood, '05, playwright-
author of "Fair and Warmer," "The
Gold Diggers," and "Who Stole Ger-
ty's Garter."
Hopwood bequeathed one-fifth of
his estate to the Regents of the Uni-
versity, "the income therefrom to be
awarded annually to students
who perform the best creative work
in the fields of dramatic writing, fic-
tion,_poetry and essay."
The income from-the bequest was
split into two parts, known respec-
tively as the major and minor
awards. Eligibility for the major was
confined to senior and graduate stu-
dents, with premiums up to $2,000
paid, while all undergraduates were
made eligible for the minor awards,
with $250 top money.
Any student regularly enrolled in
the university, taking at least one
course in composition in the English
or journalism departments, and rat-
ing "C" or better in each of his
classes, is eligible for the competition.
Contest regulations and sugges-
tions may be found in a pamphlet
available in the Hopwood Room, 3221
Angell Hall.

U on Services,
To End Today
Con gregaioi(al (,iire h
ConludesHoly Week'
Union Holy Week services, held
each day at the First Congregational
Church under the auspices of the
Ann Arbor Ministerial Association,
will be completed with a three-hour
service from noon to 3 p.m. today.
Divided into a three-part service,
the first hour's congregation will
hear an address by Rev. Frederick
Cowin, with the service in charge of
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, religious
counselor. Dr. William P. Lemon,
pastor of the Presbyterian Church,
will speak during the second part,
assisted by Dr. Leonard Parr in the
rest of the service.
Under the direction of Thor John-
son, the last part of the progi'am
will end with music suitable to Pas-
sion Week, played by the University
Little Symphony. Special soloists
will be Jean Jeffery, '43, flautist;
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist;
Margaret Martin, '42SM, vocalist and
Vladimir Lukashuk, '42SM, violinist.
Seven other Ann Arbor churches
will hold separate Good Friday after-
noon services of their own, and three
others are planning services at other
hours of the day. They are Zion
Evangelical, St. Andrew's Episcopal,
St. Paul's Lutheran, St. Thomas
Catholic, Trinity Lutheran, Bethel
A. M. E., and Bethlehem Evangelical.
Others are Grace Bible Fellowship,
Evangelical Students Chapel and St.
Mary's Catholic Student Chapel.

Missing In Action

BRING YOUR MONEY
to the
HO
Sat., April 4th
MICHIGAN UNION
$1.00 plus tax

Simpson Analyzes Jap Thrust
At Northwest Coast Of Burma

I

By KIRKE L. SIMPSON
(Wide World War Analyst)
A bold Japanese sea-borne thrust
high up the northwest coast of Bur-
ma to out-flank British defenders
on the Prome front is reported from
Chungking. British confirmation is
lacking as this is written; but pre-
vious Japanese occupation of the
Andaman Islands to the southward
in the Indian Ocean, the first actual
Nipponese invasion of India, paved
the way for it.
There are strong mountain barriers
in Burma between Akyab, the re-
ported Japanese landing place, and
the important oil wells in the valley
of the Irrawaddy. British naval forces
in the Indian Ocean also still must
be reckoned with, although their
present strength is only conjectur-
able.
A Rome broadcast recently report-
ed heavy British naval reinforce-

ments moving into the Indian Ocean.
A squadron including two battleships
and a plane-carrier was said to have
rounded Africa headed to challenge
Japanese claims of mastery of the
Bay of Bengal. London made no com-
ment; but it has been obvious since
the fall of Singapore and the Dutch
Indies that a fresh challenge to Brit-
ish sea power was looming in the
Indian Ocean.
Japanese planes and submarines
based in the Andamans could provide
an effective screen for such a troop
movement as Chungking reports. A
brief air raid scare at Colombo, Cey-
Ion, across the Bay of Bengal, indi-
cates Japanese air scouting in that
vicinity. It tends to confirm the
Chungking reports of Japanese troop
convoy movements up the Burma
coast of the bay. Whether such move-
ments are intended as a flanking
stroke at the rear of the Prome de-
fense front or as an immediate in-
vasion threat at the mainland of
India remains to be seen.
Choir To Give Program
The choir of the First Baptist
Church, East Huron, will present the
"Seven Last Words of Christ" by
Dubois at 8 p.m. today. The soloists
are Robert Holland, '43SM, Donald
Plott, '44SM and Lois Clinton, Grad.
John Dexter, '43SM, is director and
drganist for the presentation.

Second Lieut. Richard Lee Tay-
lor, who was in his University
junior year when he enlisted in the
flying forces, has been "missing in
action in the Far Eastern theatre
since March 3." Lieutenant Taylor
was a member of'Chi Psi fraternity.
Michigan Riflemen1
Conquer Ohio Team.
In Big TenVictory
Edging out the Ohio State Univer-
sity ROTC marksmen by 10 points,
in last week's postal match, the Uni-
versity ROTC rifle team was credited
with enother Big Ten win.
Char3es Munger, '45, was high man
on the Wolverine squad with George
Valette, '44, Saul Warshaw, '43, Bob
Ehrlich, '43E and Dick Jones, '43E,
taking the next four positions, in that
order. Michigan received 1,861
points and OSU 1,851.
That same week the Michigan
squad, coached by Lieut. L. W. Peter-
son of the Department of Military
Science and Tacti(.s, lost a postal
match to Indiana's small-bore team.
Indiana gathered 1,883 points to
Michigan's 1,819.
Ehrlich shot the best score for the
Michigan men. Warshaw, team cap-
tain Verne Kennedy, '42E, and Va-
lette took the next three places with
Munger, this time, in last place. j
Big Ten standings for the teams
have not been received as yet, but
it is expected that they will be sent
out to all the participating squads
soon.
Specific Training
Is Now Essential
For. J1o1se Mother
The nays of the white-haired
house mother are gone forever.
According to Miss Esther Colton,
House Director of Jordan Hall, the
girl wishing to become a house direc-
tor or perhaps even a dean of women
must have special training. House
mothers are now required to have
more than just "a way with young
people."
Miss Colton says that personnel
work is a "coming thing" and that
courses in psychology and sociology
are especially valuable in that field.
Besides genuinely liking to work
with people, she said, the necessary
qualities for success in that type of
work are understanding, sympathy,
and a sense of humor.
Miss Colton has been house direc-
tor of Jordan since it became the
first all-freshman dormitory on cam-
pus three years ago.

Engin School
Election Lists
DueApril 10
Petitions for the coming College of
Engineering elections will be due Fri-
day, April 10, at the Dean's office,
255 West Engineering Building, pre-
paratory to electing two freshmen,;
sophomores and juniors to positions
on the Engineering Council.
In order to have his 'iame placed;
on a ballot, each candidate must sub-'
mit a petition signed by at least 15
of his classmates, as well as a list
of his qualifications and a list of
proposed activities for the Council for
the coming year.
Freshmen will cast their votes in
their regular assemblies on Wednes-
day, April 15, while sophomores and
juniors will vote the same day at bal-
lot boxes to be placed over the Engi-
neering Arch and in the lobby of the
East Engineering Building.
Two Council representatives will
be elected from each of the three
classes, the freshman, sophomore and
junior receiving the highest number
of votes being elected for three, two
and one year terms respectively,
while the runners-up will each serve
for one year.
Pictures of all candidates will be
taken between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m.
Friday, April 10, in Room 244, West
Engineering Building, election direc-
tor Robert Sforzini, '43E. A charge of
twenty-five cents will be made to de-
fray expenses.
'Warship Commissionedi
NEW YORK, April 2.-(P)-Amid
the din of workmen's hammers on
two new battleships, the Navy to-
day commissioned the 1,650 ton de-
str'oyer, Farenholt, at the Navy Yard,
Brooklyn.
DAILYOFFICIAL
BULLETIN
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1942
VOL. LII. No. 135
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin 18 constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices.
Faculty Tea: It has become neces-
sary to cancel the President's Tea
formerly announced for Sunday,
April 5.
Group Hospitalization and Surgi-
cal Service: New applications for en-
rollment or revisions of former con-
tracts may be filed at the Univer-
sity Business Office until the close
of business on Saturday, April 25.-
Thereafter no new enrollments or
applications will be permitted until
next October. Applications filed in
the present enrollment period will be-
come effective May 5, 1942.
To Students Graduating at Com-
mencement, May 30, 1942: The bur-
den of mailing diplomas to members
aV _ _..... .. .

MISfELLANE0US
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gr'avel Company, phone
7112. 7c1
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
tiard St., phone 5689.
MISS -ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
SITUATIONS WANTED
YOUNG Ann Arbor married woman
with extensive experience full man-
agement of fashionable Bermuda
guest house seeks position in soror-
ity or dormitory. Available mid-
May. Further information Box
Number 7, Michigan Daily. 294c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
STUDENTS' BUNDLES WANTED--
6c per lb., rough dry. Shirts extra,
10c each. Handkerchiefs, 1c each.
Phone 25-8441. 295c
FLORISTS
FLOWERS-The way to a girl's
heart is to give her flowers. Be
sure her flowers are from LODI
GREENHOUSE. Tel. 25-8374.
270c

Student members of the Michigan
Post-War Council will meet with the
faculty advisory committee at 4 p.m.
today in President Ruthven's office.
The newly-formed campus organ-
ization-whose purpose is to con-
stantly emphasize the importance of
post-war problems-boasts one of the
best known faculty groups of any
student body. Headed by President
Ruthven, the group includes Prof.
Arthur Smithies of the economics
department, Prof. Harlow Heneman,
executive director of the University
War Board, Prof. James K. Pollock
Design Exhibit Now On
The Interior Design classes of Prof.
Catherine Haller are responsible for
the new display of color schemes and
sketches exhibited from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. daily except Sunday, in the,
ground floor show cases of the Archi-
tecture Building.

of the political science department
and Dr. Edward Blakeman, counselor
of religious education.
The Council is made .up of repre-
sentatives of major campus organi-
zations. These include The Daily, the
Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic,
Congress, Assembly, the Student
Senate, the Intercooperative Coun-
cil, the Student League of America,
Hillel, the Union, the dormitories and
one independe'nt member.
The first project planned by the
Council is an all-campus conference
scheduled for April 17 and 18. Rep-
resentatives of labor, agriculture,
business, government and religion are
being asked to attend, and nation-
ally-known speakers will talk at the
general sessions.
Personal letters have been received
by Chairman Cliff Straehley, '44,
from Vice-President Wallace, James
Carey, secretary of the CIG, Louis
Fischer, author and journalist, all
commending him on the purposes of
the Post-War Council.

Department of Speech
presents
PLAY PRODUCTION
in
"Under The
a hair-raising melodrama
TONIGHT and ,Tomorrow
8:30 P.M.
83c 55c 39c
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Students Of Post-War C~neiI
To Meet With Ficulty Advisers

CIASSIFIED ADVERTISING

WANTED TO BUY
CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD-
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-
ton. Phone after 6 o'clock, 5387.
298c
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500. Phone
Sam, 5300. 229c

{1

J1

II

DEON'T MISS IT!
..,i., t.6

r

I i

IN THE NEWSE
ON THE SCREEN

I

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I. 11 1 1 'i

I

'rQS-!1C ANi I N sI
CELEBRATES NIS
'filETNVF- FTB ANNIVERSARY
NOb
w ith one of his finest recording achievements
1R.AHMS' FIRST SYMPHONY
with the NBC Senm phony Orchestra
Hlere is a selected list of incomparable
performances by the great maestro:
BRAHMS' SECOND PIANO CONCERTO
Vtadimr i orotvi/z
THE BEETHOVEN VIOLIN CONCERTO
Jascha Heifetz
THE TSCHAIKOWSKY PIANO CONCERTO
Vladimir 1Horowitz
DIE GOTTERDAMMERUNG;
SIEGFRIED'S RHINE JOURNEY
NIC;Snmphon)y Orchestra
HAYDN'S SYMPHONY NO. 88
NBC Si mphony1 Orchestra
These are only a few of the recordings wl hih will make the art
of Toscanini live forever on
VICTOR RECORDS
You will find a Complete Stock of
SoscatlI ini Record ilgos a/ Ihe

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er i

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i/IargareI
LOCKWOOD
RED GRVE
74 -LADY

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VANISHES

II

"I forgot to buy my

MICHIGANENSIAN
when I was at school"
Don't let yourself be caught
without a copy!
I ~ ~ ~ m ilk - --

2w
MAY WHITTY
Dkected by
ALFRCED III1cIICOCI(
CITCCC

'
7

[

Sunday, April 5

11

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