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March 22, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-22

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PMGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Women's League Council Bus frs
ItselfIn Keeping Coeds Busy

Governing Body Also Aimsa
At Selecting 'Leaders' ;-S
Merit System Is Usedr
(Editor's Note: This is the tenth in
a series of articles on campus studente
government.)r
By DAN BEHRMANn
Somebody once criticized campus
men's organizations because they
lacked sufficient personnel to accom-
plish anything, but the women's
League Council is faced with the job
of keeping busy some one thousanda
assorted coeds during a Universityr
year.
In order to handle this task-slight-a
ly simpler than cleaning an Augean
stable-the League Council includesr
17 committee heads drawn from theC
ranks of standing committees, ex-t
officio members, sundry councils, andr
every major women's organization on7
campus.E
Purposes Givent
Margaret Sanford, '42, president ofr
the entire set-up, defined main pur-
poses of the Council as the "govern-I
ing of women's undergraduate func-r
tions and the development of lead-(
ers from the student body."
With the exception of two vice-1
presidents chosen by the council it-
self from its own membership, there
are no elected officers within thisr
body. Its close affiliation with ev-
ery woman on campus, however, dis-
counts most charges of "undemocrat-
ic functioning."
Prevailing opinion both from stu-
dents and some University sources
agrees that the League Council isa
CDVO Enrolls
Rural Enlisteesc
County Residents Receive
Defense Questionnaires
Washtenaw County's rural resi-
dents will be the aim of a new Ci-
vilian befense Volunteer Office en-a
rollment drive to be begun in April,
it was anounced yesterday.
Men and women living in outlying
areas will be sent questionnaires
based on their particular problems
and qualifications for CDVO work-
including such subjects as rooms for
disaster evacuees, neighborhood can-
ning groups, and cooperative trans-
poration.
The CDVO has also announced a
new program of training University
Building and Grounds men for work
as auxiliary fire and salvage wardens.
These men will receive instruction
from the city fire department.
Along the line of emergency prep-
aration, fifty new volunteers will be
taken for auxiliary fire department
training after Fire Chief Zahn and
CDVO officials decided on the eligi-
bility of present applicants. Rigid
physical qualifications are expected
to eliminate some enrollees.
Illustrating the intensiveness of
volunteer training, University tele-
phone supervisor Bert Peterson is
now on speaking terms with fire ex-
tinguishers, axes, battering rams,
pumping trucks, and war gases in-
cluding Lewisite, phosgene, chloro-
picrin and mustard gas.

a far more efficient governing body
than any of the so-called "repr-
sentative" groups still left on cam-
pus,,
The League Council is also one of
the most independent campus gov-
erning bodies--since it contains all
necessary machinery for appoint-
ments, legislation, judiciary proceed-
ings and is responsible only to itself
on nearly all rulings.
Works Independentlyl
According to Miss Sanford there
is very little need to work with other
organizations, and the council's con-
nection with the remaining campus
bodies does not go much further than
annual dinners with the Union staff.
One of the newest additions to a
many-tentacled staff is the Defense
Council in charge of such war activi-
ties as Red Cross courses, soldier cor-
respondence, and blood donor drives.
The Defense Council was also report-
ed to be one of the many channels
through which the rationed curfew
ruling was initiated.
Miss Sanford, however, told The
Daily yesterday the reduction in wo-
nien's hours came from within the
council and was passed unanimous-
ly. "Nearly everything we do is
passed unanimously," she declared.
No Trouble With Curfew
In discussing the war curfew
measure, Miss Sanford pointed out
yesterday that there has been no
trouble or flouting of regulations.
"Nothing has been heard from it
since The Daily stopped writing
stories," she asserted, "and what we
did hear at first was all from The
Daily"
Miss Sanford was emphatic about
the amount of people who always
come up for appointments. Com-
paring this to some disinterest noted
in Mien's groups she declared that
"women seem to have more time and
besides they're all fiends for organi-
zation."
Merit System Used
Appointments are handled with a
somewhat implied system of alternat-
ing top jobs between sorority and
independent women. The "merit
system" is one of the bases for these
appointments, and was initiated this
year to replace the much-abused and
abusing "League points" scale of
rating.
The League Council on the whole,
can well stand as an example of stu-
dent government actually working.
Whatever charges of bureaucracy and
top-heavy administration levelled
against it are more than out-bal-
anced by the wide interest and work
put into its functioning.
Registrars TO Attend
Annual Convention
Ira Smith and Robert Williams,
registrar and assistant registrar of
the University respectively, will at-
tend the 30th annual convention of
the American Association of College
Registrars, April 13 to 16 in Chicago.
The discussions at the convention
will center about speed-up programs,
enrollment, admissions, incomes, de-
gree requirements, personnel and co-
operation with the government and
the armed forces. One of the speak-
ers will be Brig.-Gen. Lewis Hershey,
directof of the Selective Service.

T I0
uesday Is Set
For Defense
Meeting Here'
Civilian Volunteer Helpers
In University And City
To Receive Instructions
University building wardens and all
members of the University staff who
have volunteered for civilian defense
work have been asked to meet with
town and county volunteers in a lec-
ture program at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
Hill Auditorium.
The purpose of the meeting is to
instructptheprotective services and
auxiliaries of Washtenaw County in
their duties. Films will be shown and
lectures given on fire protection, the
handling of bombs and police work.
Especially intended for policemen,
firemen, air raid wardens, disaster
preparedness and relief workers, the
meeting is not open to the public.
H. H. Caswell, chairman of the
Washtenaw County Council of De-
fense, has announced that credit will
be given for attendance. He also
asked that if other defense classes
had previously been scheduled for the
same time, they be postponed.
A special plea was made to Uni-
versity staff members who are volun-
teers or regulars in the defense work
to attend the meeting by Edward C.
Pardon, co-chairman of the Univer-
sity Committee on Plant and Person-
nel Protection.

DAILY OFFICI

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SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1942
VOL. LI. No. 125
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
mlembers of the University.
Notices
Staff Travel by Automobile: As a
easure of economy it is requested
at faculty and staff members who
ve occasion to travel on Univer-
y business by personally owned or
niversity owned automobile report
leir plans in advance to the office
Dr. Frank E. Robbins, Assistant to
Ie President (Campus telephone
8), in order that, when feasible,
rsons going to the same place at
e same time may ride in the same
r and save both tires and expense.
record of such plans will be kept
the President's Office, and those
ho'find it necessary to make a trip
ay inquire there as to the possi-
lity of riding with others.
Campus Economies: The two fol-
wing suggestions have been receiv-
from Campus offices:
1. Turn typewriter ribbons, thus
etting use from both upper and
wer half.
2. Though letters going off the
ampus would not ordinarily be writ-
n on more than one side of the
aper, where Campus letters are so
ng as to cover more than a single
age, both sides of the sheet might
celI be utilized. In the case of car-
ons of all letters too long for a
ngle page, the copy might well be
ade on both sides. (Another good
uggestion is to boil down letters
o they won't need to run over more
han a single page. This is for "dic-
ator.s". )
Faculty, School of Education: The
[arch meeting of the faculty will be
eld on Monday, March 23, in the
yniversity Elementary School Libra-
y. Tea will be served at 3:45 p.m.
nd the meeting will convene at 4:15
im.
University Building Wardens and
L1 members of the University staff
ho have volunteered for University
ivilian defense work are strongly
rged to attend the meeting to be
eld in Hill Auditorium at 8:00 p.m.,
uesday, March 24, for all protective
ervices and auxiliaries in Washte-
aw County. At this meeting, which
ill be for instructive purposes for
ll regulars and volunteers in train-

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Siviig Dusie
m
To Tire Gass
Economies
War economies in tires, gasoline
and maintenance costs in the use of M
trucks and automobiles are making h
significant savings for the University, r
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent of a
buildings and grounds, revealed yes-
Serday.
He reported that six heavy trucks
of the 15 formerly used by the Uni- a
versity storehouse and buildings and W
grounds departments have been put c
in dead storage for the duration and u
will be used only in case of emergen- h
cy. Two of the trucks, he said, have T
been laid up since last October.' s
All University-owned passenger n
cars and station wagons have been w
pooled and must be requisitioned for a]
use by staff members. Such requi-
sitions are approved only when com-
mon carrier faculties cannot provide
the services needed.
Pardon pointed out that savings in
the use of trucks have been effected
by more efficient use of the trucks
still in use, trading transportation
services among the departments, hir-
ing of some types of hauling services,
cutting down the number of routineS
deliveries and the complete elimina-
tion of many special deliveries of
supplies to departments.
Added reductions and savings will
be made, Pardon said, as soon as
studies now under way in an attempt -
to determine actual needs are com- N
pleted.
German Contest -
B
Will Be Given
Bronson-Thomas Award
To Be Presented
The Bronson-Thomas prize contest E
in German will be held from 2 to
5 p.m. tomorrow in Room 203 U.H.
Offering an award of $35, the com-
petition is open to all juniors and
seniors in German of distinctly
American training. The winner will
be decided on the results of the three- U
hour essay competition in which each
contestant is free to choose his sub-
ject from a list which covers sixI
chapters in the development of Ger-
man literature from 1750 to 1900.
The award was made possible by
a $1,000 gift from Thomas B. Bron-
son, '81, in memory of Calvin Thom-_
as, '74, who was professor of Ger-
man language and literature at the T
University from 1878 to 1896.
From 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, the
Kothe Hildner contest for students U
in German 32 will be held in Room
301 U.H. The contest carries two -
prizes of $30 and $20 and consists of V
translations from German to Eng-
lish and from English to German.

\xL BULLETIN
ng for civilian defense, several films
ill be shown followed by lectures on
're protection, handling of fire
combs, police work, etc.
Edward C. Pardon, co-chairman,
University Committee on Plant and
Personnel Protection.
Actions of the Administrative
loard, College of Literature, Science,
nd the Arts: A student was sus-
ended from February 20 to the end
f the second semester 1941-1942 for
ithdrawing a book from a Univer-
ity library under an assumed name.
A student was placed on probation
or the period, December 18, 1941, to
lay 30, 1942, for illegily removing
' book from the Law Library.
Students, College of Engineering
the final day for REMOVAL OF IN-
"OMPLETES will be Saturday, April
:. Petitions for extension of time
nust be on file in the Secretary's Of-
ice on or before Thursday, March 26.
A. H. Lovell, Secretary
Notice to non-forestry students who
pplied for summer work: A new ap-
lication form has been received from
he U.S. Forest Service and addition-
t1 data requested from all applicants.
Please call therefore between 1:45
>.m. and 5:00 p.m. at Room 3052
Natural Science Building on March
24 or 26, or on Saturday morning,
Varch 28, from 8:00 to 11:00
i.m. A short interview is required.
[f your draft status or intention to
ittend the summer term have
changed your plans so that you wish
to cancel your application, please
call 4121, Ext. 502, and give this in-
formation. Please do not phone this
number for general information about
summer forestry work.
S. T. Dana, Dean
Literary Seniors: Deadline for pay-
ing class dues is Friday, March 27.
They can be paid in Angell Hall Lob-
by 1:00-4:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and in the center of the di-
agonal 9:00-12:00 a.m. and 1:00-4:00
p.m. Monday through Wednesday.
Dues are $1.00.
M. Gomberg Scholarship and Paul
F. Bagley Scholarship in Chemistry:
These scholarships of $150 each are
open to juniors and seniors majoring
in chemistry. Preference will be giv-
en to those needing financial assis-
tance. Application blanks may be
obtained in Room 212 Chemistry Bldg.
LDVEIIT'ISING
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
WANTED TO BUY
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 5c
MEN'S AND LADIES CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500
Phnna Q nm qnn 97 ,Q1-,

and must be filed not later than
April 10.
4cademic Notices
Physics Colloquium on Monday,
March 23, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 1041
Randall Laboratory. Professor Sleat-
or will speak on "Interesting Prop-
erty of the Catenary; The Path of
a Rolling Hoop; B and H in College
Physics."
mThe Bacteriological Seminar will
meet in Room 1564 East Medical
Building on Monday, March 23, at
8:00 p.m. The subject will be "Up-
per Respiratory Infections." All in-
terested are cordially invited.
Biological Chemistry Seminar will
meet on Tuesday, March 24, at 7:30
p.m., in Room 319, West Medical
Building. "The Liver - Function and
Metabolism" will be discussed. All in-
terested are invited.
Psychology 42 Makeup, bluebooks
1 and 2, will be given Monday, March
23, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 1121 Nat-
ural Science.
Bronson-Thomas Prize Competition
will be held on Monday, March 23,
2:00-5:00 p.m. in Room 203 U.H.
Kothe-Hildner Sophomore compe-
tition to be held Thursday, March 26,
2:00-4:00 p.m. in Room 301 U.H.

Typewri ters

Service
Work a
Specialty
Sp pplies

DO YOU
KNOW
we are
now renting
typewriters
all makes.

314 South State

L,

CONTINUOUS DAILY at
Sunday Adults 40c
All Day inc. tax

1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
4 i Y .STlA 1A

NlOW

PLAYiNG!

l
t
i
E

Concerts
May Festival Concert: Students or
others desiring to have copies of the
announcement of the May Festival
sent to their parents, friends or
musical acquaintances, will please
leave names and addresses at the
(Continued on Page 4)

t
3
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x

II

t--

CLASSIFIED A

E

1.~

____.___.. _ _ - - 1

ti"
' +lTx

Announcing
OPPORTUNITY!

MANY OPPORTUNMEs are open for YOU now. Trained office workers
are reeded in business and military positions. Our skilled staff can give
you the instruction which will enable you to capitalize on these
opportunities. Enroll now!
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
William at State

TAILORING and SEWING
TOCKWELL and Mosher-Jordan 1
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678. 3c
LOST and FOUND%
NATURAL colored gaberdine rain-
coat with white pigskin gloves in
pocket. Lost at League. Call 2-2868.
281c
3ROWN WALLET-Valuable identi-
fication and license cards. Re-
ward. Lost Wednesday, vicinity of
General Library. 2-2248, "Dick."
280c
REAL ESTATE
BUI4D YOUR HOME in University
Gardens-large tracts, trees, hills,
restricted. $800 up. Farley, 2-2475.
275c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
i t sd
and Blocked

r,
},
r

Coming,
Tuesday!

enone yam, ,Dsuu a ac

Extra
ROBT. BENCHLEY
"THE WITNESS"

TAYLOR 'N' TURNER TOGE$R
Lana gets socked! Lana gets kissed! It's
romantic T. N. T. when Lana whispers to
Bob: "Hold me close! Hold me tight in
your arms, Johnny Eager!" Thrills from
the pen of "Boom Town's" author!

Added
RHAPSODY IN RIVETS
WORLD NEWS

ABBOTT & COSTELLO
' *'ce 0 0 I

"I've told other women I loved
'em, but I didn't mean it, see?
This time I'm on the up-and-up-
I've turned sucker for a dame!"

Id

(I

(TAYLO RN TO R N E R
A MERVYN Le Y Production
EDWARD ARNOLD
VAN HEFLIN- ROOT. STERUNG' a
P4TtCIA DANE - GLEND FARRELL
HENRY O'NEILL. DIANA LEWIS
PICIREP

I

)-'

"Flying Bear"
Carroon
PARAMOUNT NEWS

Hill

- ter

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