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March 20, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILYF4 s

Sleeping America Is In Mortal'
Danger, Van Paassen Declares
(Continued from Page 1) (Continued from Page 1)

'Girl From

Leningrad'

through" cannot hold true any more,
the foreign correspondent said, be-
cause this time the United States
is also vitally concerned with the out-
come of the war. And we cannot
stand aside and wait for something
miraculous to happen.
Van Paassen pointed out that the
Germans, now synchronized with
Japan, have carried out a highly
successful policy of defeating superi-
or naval powers by going around
them by land.
In Russia, where the Soviets out-
planned the Nazi planners, Hitler is
not- well off, but outside of that a~rea,
the Axis is winning this war, not
losing it, van Paassen declared. The
events of this summer and fall will
in all probability decide who will win
this war, though it need not end
this year, the author of "Days of Our
Years" said.
In regard to Pearl Harbor, van
Paassen vigorously pointed out that
Kimmel and Short are only to blame
in small measure. It is all of Ameri-
ca who failed to see the danger of
Japan, though warned by every
thoughtful observer and Japanese
writings as far back as 16 years ago.
Concluding his address with an eye
to the future, van Paassen explained
his view that to merely bring back
the governments in exile would not
be sufficient excuse to keep on fight-
ing. "The day of the little independ-
ent countries is over," he said. "We
must come out of this war with a
united Europe, bound peacefully to-
gether by economic ties. It cannot be
done the Nazi way, with brute force."

day announcement is made of nego-
tiations, we may be quite sure that
the deal is already completed or near
completion. French troops are not
being sent there to "protect the is-
land against all invaders," but to
hold it while France makes the deal
with Japan.
Swinging over to India, van Paas-
sen was of the opinion that America
looks "a little silly" sending a com-
mission there when the Japanese are
already in Burma. But from this,
and from the attitude of the Austral-,
ians, it is becoming more 9,,nd more
apparent that the United States, di-t
rected by President Roosevelt, is
gradually taking over the leadership
of the Allied Nations.
Van Paasssen believes that the old
"British Empire" days are over, and
that the United States will come out
of this war the leader of the world
powers.
Inanswer to the oft-rumored dec-
larations that Russia is to be feared
and not trusted, van Paassen pointed
out, "if the British Tories can deal
with Russia, we ought to be able to
do anything at all." He added that
if Trotsky were alive, the situation
might well be different, but Stalin is
not a Communist, but rather a Na-
tionalist, satisfied to work with Rus-
sia alone and not the whole world.
"Anyway," van Paassen said, "Rus-
sia will be far less 'dangerous' if we
collaborate with her, than if we at-
tempt to keep her isolated. And as
for Russians being slaves, no slaves
would ever fight the way they are,
even with a loaded gun at their
backs."

Filmed on location along the former Mannerheim Line under the
direction of Red Army officers, "Girl From Leningrad," celebrated Rus-
sian film based on World War 11, will be presented by the Art Cinema
League at 8:15 p.m. today and at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
yAlumni May Obtai
Reading Lits n 466 Subjects

.........

.....

HOSIERY
Ray De Chine Hosiery, 3-thread
weight at 89c, silk hosiery in 2-
and 3-thread at $1.00 and $1.15.
BLOUSES
"Joan Kenley" tailored in white
and all cofors at $2.00 and $3.00.
SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

Prof. Aiton To Talk
To Newman Club
Speaking on "A Phase of our Good
Neighbor Policy," Prof. Arthur S.
Aiton of the history department will
address the second Newman Club
communion breakfast after 10 o'clock
mass Sunday in the Union.
The breakfast will serve to end the
spring membership drive and to in-
itiate new members into the Club's
activities. Joe Rodecker, '42, is in
charge of the event. James Landers,
'43, will act as toastmaster, and Fa-
ther McPhillips and Albin Schin-
derle, '42, will also speak.
Guests include Dr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward W. Blakeman, Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Morgan, Prof. and Mrs. W.
A. McLaughlin, Dr. and Mrs. Harold
W. Held, Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Fitz-,
gerald and The Rev. Frs. Otte, Mc-
Mann and Alcuin.

Study Program Offeredt
To Encourage Interests
On Part Of Graduates1
Assuming that the educational pro-t
cess does not cease with graduation,f
the Bureau of Alumni Relations andt
the Library Extension Service haveY
prepared up-to-date reading lists onr
some 466 subjects, any of which will
be sent to an alumnus of the Univer-
sity upon request.t
The two agencies have long felt
that it is desirables toencourage a
continuation of personal reading and
study on the part of individual alum-k
ni. It is also felt that many former
students would be interested in car-
rying on the programs of study they
began in their undergraduate years
at the University.
Prepared for all those concerned
with such mental development, the
lists include books on everything
from ancient Indian art and phila-
tely to labor legislation and the law
of the press.
In addition to the hundreds of lists
which have been prepared in co-
operation with faculty members over
a period of 12 years, the Library Ex-
tension Service has also published
three books of the same nature. The
first two of these are entitled Alumni
Reading Lists, Series I and II, while
the third in the series is entitled
What To Read.

books does not represent the entire
service offered by the University to
its knowledge-hungry graduates.
Any alumnus who desires a list of
books in any subject which has not
previously been tabulated may write
to the Bureau of Alumni Relations
and have a special list prepared for
him. The work will be done with the
aid of the most competent members
of the faculty in the particular field
desired.
The Bureau has recently an-
nounced that since the task of pro-
viding such reading lists for alumni
was started in 1930, some 64,000 have
been distributed to more than 9,000
alumni.
A new pamphlet has just been is-
sued by the Bureau which records
all the lists available.
'Settin' 'Em Up'
Keeps 'Em Flying
Don't blush now . . . . . It's all
for defense . ... .
It was recently reported that
ten tons of tin cans were taken
from the University dumping
grounds east of Observatory . . .
and a large number of them
turned out to be beer containers.
These cans are taken by truck
to Detroit and sold to a company
which puts them through a spe-

Cors To Giv
Lecture Sei
arch_27
Three Talks To Be
Of] Sientific S
By Well-Known
Drs. Carl and Gerty Co
the United States' well kn
band and wife teams, will
series of three lectures Mar
28 which will be of specialh
students of medicine and
logical sciences.
The lectures, all of whi(
given in the Rackham Amp
will run as follows:
"The Role of Enzymes1
hydrate Metabolism," by
Cori, 4:15 p.m. March 27.
"The Isolation and Pro
Some Enzymes Concerned
bohydrate Metabolism," by
Cori, 8:15 p.m. March 27.
"The Enzymatic Conv
Glucose to Glycogen," by
Cori, 11 a.m. March 28.
These lectures are under
sponsorship of the Depa.
Biological Chemistry and t
of Medicine.
The Drs. Cori are from W
University Medical School
Carl Cori is head of the D
of Pharmacology, and Dr.C
is a research associate in
department.
Born in Prague, Czec
the Coris both received the
Prague in 1920 and cam
country in 1922. From th
here until 1931, they work
chemists at the State In
the Study of Malignant D
Buffalo, New York. Since
have been associated with
ton University.
The Coris are well know
studies on the synthesis of
the reserve carbohydrate o
and the fuel for muscula
in recognition for his wor
Cori was elected a member
tional Academy of Scienc
All of the lectures will b
the public.
Air Pro gra
Given On I
In Commi
Improvement of comm
reational, educational an
life is advocated by the U
Committee on Adult Educ
der the guidance of Prof.
McCluskey of the School
tion, every Tuesday at 3:4
station WKAR.
The purpose of this w
gram, broadcast from the
State College studio, is tw(
cording to William Morse.
of the show.
Primarily intended for
communities of central M
aim is to "stimulate repr
of clubs, churches, schools
groups to form communit
which would plan how to
problems," Morse explaine
The second goal of the
cation group is to revive
interest in current proble
the already formed Mich
cils.
Organized since Septe
Adult Education group d

its 15-minute broadcast
community programs thro
state and nation," Morse
present general principles
ization and methods of for
councils." Small town c
Michigan, Virginia and Pe
have provided material for
Morse declared.
The adult education
broadcast a similar series
from Ann Arbor's Morris
WJR, "with fewer exa,
more theory," Morse adde

CLASSIFIED
ries IRECTORY
LAUNDERING
Given LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
4bt)Jc~ts CarefulYwork at low price. 2c
Team LOST and FOUND
ri, one of BROWN WALLET-Valuable identi-
iown hus- fication and license cards. Re-
ward. Lost Wednesday, vicinity of
present a General Library. 2-2248, "Dick."
ch 27 and 280c
interest to MISCELLANEOUS
the bio- -_ - _ __ _ __ - _ _
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis bind-
ch will be ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
hitheatre, S. State. 6c
Special tryout for campus BMbCs
in Carbo- tonight at the Union. No identifi-
Dr, Carl- cation card needed; only $1.35, and
Dr. Carl a date.
Keep 'Em Dancing, Limited
peties -of
with Cr WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Dr. Gerty Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Kilins Gravel Company, phone
ersion ofI7112. 7c
Dr. Carl TRANSPORTATION
the joint SAVE MONEY
rtment of Driving? We find paying passengers.
the School Going away? We locate rides. Na-
tionwide service. Fee nominal.
fashington DETROIT AUTO TRAVEL
where Dr. Detroit, Michigan
epartment 2970 W. Grand Blvd. Madison 6268
Gerty Cori HELP WANTED
the same
hoslovakia, STUDENT with architectural train-
In MD's at ing to do defense house drafting.
eto this Write Box No. 7, The Daily.
eir arrival
ted as bio-
Xttue for
)iseases in
1931 they
Washing-
n for their
glycogen,
f the body A
r exercise.
k, Dr. Carl
of the Na-
es in 1941. a
be open to W
-1Wo can live ai
That is-two shirts. Th
shirts are one. Arrow I
L fe it's a sports shirt and a
your fancy. This inge
Arrow, is now one of t
unity rec- puses. Labeled Sanfon
d cultural shrink even I%! See iti
Jniversity's
ation, un-
Howard Y.
of Educa-
3 p.m. over
eekly pro-
Michigan
in charge
the rural '
ichigan, its
esentatives
and other
y councils,
solve local
~d.
adult edu-
an active
ms among
igan coun- S T A T E S T R E E
I AR
mber, the
escribes in

t "various
ughout the
said. "We
of organ-
rming local
councils in
nnsylvania
the shows,
committee
s last year
Hall over
mples and -
ed.
se
TH
it's the same shirt
ERE'S a shirt tha
It's convertible-y
875 with a tie and it's perf
ords off when you get lion
handsome, expensive-lc
Arrow Doubler comes i
labeled Sanforized (sly
has two pockets an
"Mitoga" figure-fit. Get

WHO IS IT?

S cheaply as one!
e reason is that the two
Doubler is the name and
dress shirt according to
rnious shirt, invented by
ie favorites of U. S. cam-
zed - guaranteed not to
today!

REAL ESTATE
BUILD YOUR HOME in University
Gardens-large tracts, trees, hills,
restricted. $800 up. Parley, 2-2475.
275c
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist;
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
WANTED TO BUY
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING.
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500.
Phone Sam, 5300. 229c

Shows Daily at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
NN.1.....,,- S r1,

{
t
t
i
i
i
ti

1 1

DOROTHY LAMOOR
WILLIAM HOLDEN
EDDIE BRACKEN
JIMMY DORSEY
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
I.BE n HEOg
808 EBERLY and HELEN O'CONEL

I

MICHIGAN
with th li
bolmb~b-i I9tg T*"
ith
.ARR NEO
sUT CRAIN
Coin "JOH NNY EU
SundayI~UZ

NOWESHOWING
Mats'. 25c Ev08 40r" inc.

The distribution of these lists an

r
'" c ,
'
'
'' .f _ T.. ..

AGERrt

ROBERT TAYLOR
LANA TURNER

i

All Proceeds For
Allied War Relief
EEL L E NT/i"oeel.wo/d r
"***...EXCITING!"
S- Wanda'ale -DailyNewe
-PACKS A WAR-TIME WALLOP!"
-ArcherWuisten NYPost
"BEST FOREIGN FILM OF THE YEAR." -WM. BOEHNEL,
NEW YORK TELEGRAM. Fine acting, expert direction and a first
rate script make GIRL FROM LENINGRAD excellent entertain-
ment . . . It makes all the Hollywood offerings about the later
Florence Nightingales look like so many tinted picture postcards .
The battle scenes are thrilling."
Extra
* Tigers Captured Alive in Siberia
* Hairless Hector (Cartoon)
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

d cial baling machine so that they
can be repaired and used over
again throughout the defense
emergency period.
Forty to fifty tons still remain
in the dump to be removed in the
future .-. .
Screwy 'Gar g'
Maddens Bugs
Frustrated TypI Lice Run
Ragged By Hard Work
Topsy-turvy conglomerations of-in-
cidentals have been working the type
lice into a frenzy of late, ever since
Gargoyle's editors put into working
order their plans for a real Screwball
magazine this month.
Contributing to cause the frantic
antics of little Oscar and his cousins
is a certain confusion resulting from
the appearance of strange notations
under the head, Album of Beauty.
They have seen this head before, but
what appears beneath is something
entirely new and definitely different.
A new connotation has been given
the word "beauty," a meaning
smacking of revolutionary standards
of measurement and the birth of a
new order on the University campus.
All of this, plus a multitude of
other brain children will become pub-
lic property Tuesday when the March
Gargoyle comes into its own, after
weeks of inspired preparation.
RECORD HIGHLIG
ARTURO T
conducting the NBC.
BRAHMS SYMPHON
The powerful, exciting Brahn
is dramatic perfection under t
batoji of Toscanini. Hear t
symphonic work just released
bration of Toscanini's 75th ani
Recorded in Carnegie Hall.
MAURICE EVANS an
present important sce
"A A C

T AT LIBERTY
Row
4 ,4

0

508 E. WILLIAMS
Formerly
University Music Hous

wmblool

HTS of the MONI
rOSCANINI

- Arrow's Doublev

Symphony Orchet
Y NO. 1 in CM
m's First
he magic Alb
his great Five
in cele-
niversary.

um M4
12" rec

t knows how to relax!
'u can wear it alliday
ectly smart; take the tie
ne and you can have a
oking sport shirt!
n a variety of fine fabrics
hrinkage less than 1%),
A has Arrow's famed
Doubler today!

d JUDITH ANDERSON
nes from Shakespeare's

I

________Also _____

I

i

I

"'RCTLU

I

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