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March 17, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-17

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E* T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ii Y: ', iUARIi'H 17; ISM:

ETWO TUESThiT. MARCH 11~ 1942

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SRA To HearI
Last Address
Rev. Bradford Abernathy
To SpeakAt Rackham
The Rev. Bradford S. Abernathy,
secretary of the Federal Church
Commission to Study the Bases of a
Just and Durable Peace, will con-
clude the Student Religious Associa-
tion's spring lecture series with a talk'
on the "Bases for a Just Peace" at
8:15 p.m. Friday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Mr. Abernathy was appointed to
his present post in September. He
is a graduate of Haverford College.
He received his Bachelor of Divinity
degree from the Colgate-Rochester
Divinity School in 1933 and has stud-
ied at both Oxford and the Univer-
sity of Edinburgh.
As head of the peace commission,
Mr. Abernathy is in charge of pre-
senting to the church the issues in-
volved in the task of post-war re-
construction.

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Local Civilan Vo
To Send SOS F
Spurred on by Fire Chief Ben
Zahn's observation that Ann Arbor's
present force of 26 auxiliary fire-
fighters isn't "half enough" to com-
bat either bombs or fires, the local
Civilian Defense Volunteer Office
will send a special SOS for 26 more
volunteer firemen beginning today.
The firse chief announced that all
I volunteers must be American citi-
zens, preferably below 50 years old
and capable of hard physical exer-
tion. He wants no "squeamish fire-
men" because everybody's got to have
e his fingerprints taken.
To enroll new volunteers, a special
staff of registrars will be on duty
at the Armory daily. Office hours are
Sfroni 9 a .m. to noon and from 1 to 51
p.m. The drive will end in a week.
The firemen will all go through an
intensive program of training, after
which they must pass the standard
R 20-hour Red Cross first-aid course
and complete a set quota of hours
devoted to fire-fighting instruction.
The present staff of 26 men -are
WPB Ban Hits Jukes
WASHINGTON, March 16.-(A)-
The War Production Board tonight
ordered the shut down of all manu-
facture of juke boxes, weighing ma-
chines, pinball games and other
amusement machines on May 1. The
order affects an industry of about 30
companies, mostly in the Chicago
area, employing about 10,000 per-

French Group
To Hear Talk
ByProf HamI
Attempts at humor and other oddi-
ties occurring in a wide variety of
medieval French texts form the basis
for the seventh in the series of lec-
tures sponsored by the Cercle Fran-
cais, which will be given at 4:15 p.m.
tomorrow by Prof. Edward B. Ham of
the Romance language department.,
In considering these "Curiosities
Medievales," Professor Ham will at-
tempt to indicate that the medieval
comic spirit was less naive than has
long been popularly supposed, and
that the medieval Frenchman was
much less credulous about what he
read than modern critics usually ad-
mit.
Among the materials he will use
as illustrations are the bestiaries,
fabliaux, medieval books of manners,
short poems, proverbs and the "epic-
grotesque."
lunteer Office
or More Firemen
already in training and have been
divided into two groups, one of which
has finished its first-aid course. Even
full-time members of the fire de-
partment are learning a few things
about bandages.
The chief has ordered 25 sets of
rubber cats, boots and helmets to be
used by the auxiliary corps of fire-
fighters. Close cooperation between
the "volunteers" and the regular fire
department is expected and all fire-
men will be subect to short-notice
call.
'La I nd epend enia'
"i Ofered Tonight
"A bit of old Spain" will be carried
into Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre t
8:30 p.m. today when La Sociedad
Hispanica will present "La Indepen-
dencia."
A costume play dealing with the
manners in Spain in the eighteenth
century, "La Independencia" is an
unusually large offering for a lan-
guage club. Shooting and shouting,
abandoned babies, arevolution, hi-
larious situations and romantic en-
tanglements prove that the author,
Manuel Breton de los Herreros, made
the action abundant and fast-mov-
ing.

H' Quartet- 'To he Shores Of Tripoli'

Ball Proceeds
To lie Dottated
To Inter-Club
Tickets for the International Ball,.
whose proceeds will be donated to
the Emergency Fund for Foreign
Students will go on sale at the end
of this week, Robert Klinger, presi-
dent of the Inter-Club Board and
assistant counselor to foreign stu-
dents, announced yesterday.}
The Inter-Club Board, which is
sponsoring the ball to be held on
Friday, April 17, will present all the
profits to the emergency fund. Do-
nations to cut the expenses of the
ball are being accepted by the board.
The Emergency Fund for Foreigni
Students was established by Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson to aid students with
acute financial difficulties.
The war has increased student
difficulty in obtaining money from
their homelands. The loans, which
may be paid back whenever the bor-
rowers can afford it, have added fur-
ther burdens to the already limited
r'esources of the emergency fund.

A long period of emotional repres-
sion in childhood may be the cause1
for many periodic headaches experi-
enced by adults, Dr. Floyd 0. Due,
instructor in psychiatry, hypothe-
sized in an article in the March issueI
of the University Hospital Bulletin.1
These psychogenic headaches, Dr..
Due explained, may begin with aI
continued subconscious presence of
anger or hostility, begun in relationI
to family conflicts or' rivalyy with
other children in the home, produc-
ing an emotional "set" which may
persist through adulthood.
With the addition of another fac-
tor, such as an allergic sensitivity, he
pointed out, the attack of a head-
ache might be set off. But allergy
alone is not responsible for such an
attack, he added.
Of extreme importance in the diag-
nosis of a headache is the method
of description used by the patient
himself, Dr. Due asserted. The hys-

Child's Emotional Repression
May Result In HeadIaches Later
By HOWARD FENSTEMAKER terical type can often point out de-

-Daily Photo by Will Sapp
Shown as they took their oath of enlistment in the Marine Corps
Reserve last week are (left to right) Dale Chamberlain, '42, George
Callens, '43, Al Darling, '42, and Jack Vaughan, '43. They are aspirants
to the rank of second lieutenant in the Corps. The program is similar
to the Navy's V-7 Reserve Plan.

finite areas of attack, often drama-
tizing the extent of suffering; the
borderline psychotic or early schizo-
phrenic is usually unable to describe
his headache; and patients who ex-
hibit anxiety frequently experience
headaches wit ha constricting band-
like sensation around the head, he
explained.
A complete history of the patient's
life situation, wtih a correlation of
attacks with changes in internal and
environmental situations will usually
throw light upon the most puzzling
problems of diagnosis, according to
Dr. Due. Such a complete history,
however, is often difficult to obtain
in one interview because of a natur-
al resistance to the admission of dis-
turbing conflicts, he commented.
The study of headaches must be
approached as a totality rather than
as a single anatomical r physiologi-
cal concept, he emphasized. Fre-
quently, he pointed out, an illness or
symptom such as a headache may
be seen as the patient's attempt to
solve an intolerable situation.

Instructions For World Student Service Fund Collectors

Instructions to people on posts for W.S.S.F. Drive:
1. All questions are cleared through Lane Hall (4121-Ext. 2148).
2. Do not leave post until someone comes to relieve you. If you have to leave before Ch e next person comes, call Lane Hall.
3. Last person on the post, return the bank to Lane Hall, State Street.
4. Every few hours, sokneone will replenish your supply of book marks, and empty you r bank.

POST
Front of
Alumni Hall
Front of
Angell Hall
Front of
Library
Romance
Languages Bldg.
East Engin'ring
Bldg.
Front of
League
East Quad
West Quad
Unionwalk
N. back of
Angell Hall
Arcade
Entrance
Engine
Arch
North U. and
State Street
Walk East
of Waterman
Law
Quadrangle
In Front
of Union

8
J. Weinstein
M. Lovejoy
M. Englehardt
M. Moore
R. Summerhays
S. Field
W. Todd
D. Orcutt
B. Walker
L. Warner
D. Schaible
R. Schoel
J. Boult

9
D. Levy
D. Zollner
R. Schulze
E. Root'
B. French

III

M.
R.

Teller
Titus

N. Norris
R. Leshine
L. Morrison
D. Hendricks
S. Churchill
V. Rohr
R. Coe

R. Teesdale
E. Gutekunst
F. Aaronson
G. Zrrnack
F, Vyn
L. Cunningham
0. Johnson
B. Partetiselder
B. Geltmer
N. Filstrup
11. Almdale
J. Ramsay
A. Drake
B. Matthews

I. Stevenson
14 Nelson
V. Purdorn
0. Shimmons
J., Burnham
R. Scott
H. Seltzer
it. Shuey
E. Luckhaml
S. Greene
J. Johnson
C. Lauzoil
M. Kendall

12
J. Cooper
M. Elkins
M. A. Dewey
B. Kefgen
A. Wilkie
V. White
M L. Ewing
,J. McKinnon
J. Manwaringf
I. Aronstein
B. Sachs
R. Clark
R. Schwab
E Laufer

I
W. Robinson
J. Sollitt
P. Brown
R. Clark
W. Collamore
M. J. Chriswell
L. Judson
E. Hitt
H. Organick
R. Gustafson
D. Harris
V. Morse
R. Carlson
P. Polumbaum
T. Johnson
H Organick

W. Westrate
E. Longyer
C. Thompson
L. Reisman
J. Wilkie
K. Gladdin
S. Maxwell
R. Sharpe

2

J. Wiese
M. Sellon
B. Newman
V. Jominy
P. Mandel
G. Parsons
F. McCarthy

4
N. (ild
N. Nussman
G. larris
L. Price
A. Holt
M. Wallach

E:. Ph

5

F.
J.
M.

Hoffman
Hooker
Radford

eishman
oldfarb
ger
Moms
lest

Gardner

M.

M. Tobin
M. L. Curran
A. Grunewald
V. Frey
J. Hall
B. Shott

L. Newman
N. Church
J. Linker
P. Lovejoy
B. Yale
H. Byer

J. G

W. A
J. Th
D. W

D.

Weidman

G
A
H

Wills
Caughey
Heavenrich

son
ma
tia
nic
pre
con
int

',

ls. Dr. Charles Staubach of the Span-
The Board said the shutdown would ish department, who is directing the w_-
ke available for war uses substan- production, has announced the main Prof. Eaton To Talk Today
[ quantities of copper, aluminum, characters to be: Marian Edgar, '43, Best D ressed Jan O n Cam pus
kel and other critical metals, and Emil Hurtik, '45, Mary L. Gunn, '43, On Intelligence Service
dicted that it would hasten the Henry Wolf, '44, An Terbreuggen, B Discoveo ts
version of the $75,000,000 industry '45, John Falconieri, '42, Bert Ludy, U1v Prof. John W. Eaton, of the Ger-
o war production. '42, and Allan Anderson, '44. -_-- man department, will speak on "In-
(Continued from Page 1) Still to be held are contests at a telligence Work in the Last War"'at
California university and Cornell. a meeting of the Deutscher Verein
by two methods. A committee of In a forthcoming issue, Esquire will at 8 p.m. today in Room 305 of the
A l Proceeds For campus leaders, later to be selected, run a complete story of this coast to Michigan Union.
will nominate 10 candidates on the coast competition, including stories During the first World War, Pro-
W.c.t le a of the universities involved and a fessor Eaton was a member of the
A iedar e l basis of consistent well-dressed and composite color picture. British intelligence. He now teaches
well-groomed appearance. Style set- a course in military German. His
ters who have been inadvertently /F Dty o't They Io talk will be given in English and will
overlooked by the committee may en- deal not only with German but with
,-. &4 ~~~~ter competition by submitting a pe- Trr5AlTh ia he use of any foreign language in
ROM tition endorsing the candidacy and wartime military intelligence.
with signed with 25 names to the Student We hear a lot of talk about "Cali---
OVA FYODOROVA Offices at the Union. fornia drivers" but Ann Arbor drivers
eWinner of the contest will not be have their off days too.
i inr fte ots wl otb av hi ofdysto eroe Women chosen by Esquire, nor its representa- Police received a report that one MCI A
at the Front- EXTR tive now on c pushelpinit atman was sleeping in his car on the
War Nurses in Action EXTR tiemnow on y n l campus hligwt r street. Upon investigation they found
rageensbu b a al amusthe driver had been to a party and Through
* Unusual Tiger Hunting in Siberia poll beginning Monday. Michigan'swsringrtha "sbee tof pa r e
*Hairless Hector (Cartoon) BDMOC, the man who pulls down he attempted to drive. Police sentW
the most votes, the winer, -will be he atmed t d Poi s W sd
announced at Zoot Suit Stuff, where him home in a taxi and put his car
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE an all male crew will sport local mer- away for him.
chants' latest spring styles. Jack Elisfor, 704 Felch, became -. 3
Thurs., Fri., Sat., 8:15 P.M.--39c Box Office operas Wed. 10 AM. Michigan is the ninth university to pretty angry when another car col- BENJAMIN
Phone 6300 for Reservations hold a concerted hunt for its lided with his so he stepped out toB A
Special Matinee Saturday afternoon 3:30 P.M. BDMOC. Other universities where repimand the other dive He nev BLAKE
smoke outs have been held include ei had a chance it was a woman
North Carolina, Syracuse, Pennsyl adiver sAllhe could tell police was
ART CI NEMA LEAGU E vna icniNrhetrN that she was petty nasty .
braska, Louisiana State, n yrA F
I'f AND
V MANY
t : - - A Grand
Congratultionsture
to the W. S. Butterfield Theatres, Inc. .:Nes
WA are pleased to have had the opportunity
to decorate this beautifLul theatre, WHO IS IT
LAST PERFORMANCE /I
ter ry 'iFAr

flTTENTION!

t

KEEP IN STEP!
with
Gargocoyle

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