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December 19, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

our Univer sit y Scientists
To Present New Findings
At Two Research Meetings

Pearl Harbor: Scene Of Japanese Bombs A n d Machine Gun Fire,

Prof.
On
At

Soule Will Lecture
Bacteria Cultivation
Cleveland Session

research assistant in the department
of, human genetics here,, and, he will
present a paper entitled "The Bio-
metrical Approach in Human Gen-
etics."
In his paper, Dr. Cotterman will

Continuing a research program attempt to show that the main dif-
started by the /University in 1906, ference between human genetics and
Prof. Malcolm Soule of the bacteri- animal genetics is not in the prin-
ology department will deliver a paper ciples involved but in the approach
on "Cultivation of the Spirochetes of on thesubledth
Relapsing Fever," at the Dallas meet- on hesubct
,ir}g of the National Convention of He will contend that mathematical
Sciences. methods are capable of utilizing frag-
Pofessor Soule, scheduled to speak merktary evidence with precision.;
December 30, has been making test-
tube studies of the relapsing fever Papers To Be Given
bacteria and has collected data on Two members of the University fac-
@their ability , to withstand various utywill deliver a paper at the Dec.
agents.- y 30 session of the American Astronom-
Relapsing fever, found along the ical Society in Cleveland.
western coast of the United States, The Society, to convene for its67th
is transmitted through ticks and lice, meeting, will hear a discussion of
Professor Soule explained; and prob- "Large Irregularities In the Wave-
ably enters this country through Length Sensitization of the 103-F
Mexico and Central Amerca. Emulsion," prepared by W. A. Hiltner
and R. G. Fowler of the University
Coterman To Give Talk astronomy and physics departments.
A scientist' who believes you can
apply mathematics to' human gen- Britain Drafts Women 1
etics will be one of four speakers at LONDON, ec. 1-na-
the symposium on human genetics tal conscription bill providing for
sponsored jointly' by the American compulsory national service by wom-
Society of Naturalists and the Genetic en and extending the conscription
Society of America on Dec. 31 at ages for men to 18 to 50 years be-
Dalas, Tex came law today with the signature
He is Drg. Charles W. Cotterman, of.ing George VL.
,
WeThank You
,Th
for yoWr patronage
during the past year and
wish you a 1{. .
r r
Merry Christmas
and a
H ap py New Year
o WAHR'S BOOKSTORES
AND EMPLOYEES
RelaxF'ellers!
Here's Wishing
Every Student...
Boy andGiri
A Genuine

CHRISTMAS'
and
HAPPY N EW YEAR!
Have a Happy
Vacation .w
We'll be awaiting your return with some
Good Shows -"Sergeant York" on the
screen ... "Arsenic and Old'Lace" on
the stage.
TODAY
DOUBLE FEATURE BILL
Franchot Tone Laurel & Hardy
"This Woman t r "

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S pecial Courses
To Begin Here
Engineer Training Series
To Open Jan. 12
Meeting the demand for men
trained in technical fields, a new
series of engineering courses will be
opened under the Engineering, Sci-t
ence and Management Defense Train-
ing program Jan. 12 in Detroit, Dear-
born, Royal Oak, Ecorse, Jackson,
Flint and Ann Arbor.
More than 900 engineering em-
ployes received instruction in the
first series held in the fall, and it is.
expected that this second series will
be equally beneficial. A third series
is now being planned and will be
opened in the spring.
A course in Ultra-High Frequency
Techniques under Prof. L. N. Hol-
land of the electrical engineering de-
partment will be offered under the
program the second semester, and
will be open to senior and graduate
electrical engineers, who may take
the course for credit.
Other Ann Arbor courses are De-
scriptive Drawing by Prof. J.GC. Pal-
mer, of the engineering drawing 'de-
partment and Mechanical Drawing
by. Prof. Maurice Eichelberger of the
mechanical drawing, department.
Included in the courses"scheduled
for Detroit, where the majority of the
courses will be presented, are instruc-
tion in welding, engine design, dy-
namics, die castin'g, ordnance inspec-
tion and air conditioning.

Offers Prizes
To Lit Students
A nation-wide debating ,contest
open to all liberal arts undergradu-
ates, offering a first prize of $1,000. a
second prize of $500 and eight prelim-
inary prizes of $50 each has been an-
nounced by the American Economic
Foundation. 295 Madison Ave.. New
York.
"Does Youth Have a Fair Oppor-
tunity Under our American System
of Competitive Enterprise?" will be
the question for debate. Each par-
ticipating college and university will
choose by competitive selection its
representative. Each student chosen
will then file a 500-word brief with a
panel of judges, who will select the
eight best affirmative briefs and the-
eight best negative briefs.
A series of radio debates over local
etations of the National Broadcast-
ing Company will reduce the number
to four, who will present their argu-
ments May 10 over the NBC Blue
Network,
. a
Hobbs To Fly Away
Prof. William H. Hobos of the geol-
ogy department plans to fly'o San-
tiago, Chile, in January to the "First
Pan American Congress of Mining
Engineering and Geology," where he
will represent both the College of En-
gineering of the University and the
Carnegie Endowment for Interna-
tional Peace.

It was just another bright sunny Sunday morning at Pearl Harbor naval base, December 7, shortly be-
fore this picture was taken. Then, of a sudden, came a hail of Japanese bombs and maehine gun fire,
leaving the burning battleship Arizona sinking in the harbor and four other warships destroyed. With the
cry, "Remember Pearl Harbor," America declared herself officially at war with Japan shortly after the sur-
prise raid.
'Time Is Short'- New Army Motto:
r i
DeRtroit Ordnance Office Coordinates
Work Of Major District Industries'

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By CHARLES THATCHER-
(Special to The Daily)
Detroit, Dec. 18-"Time is short."
So reads a wall banner in the cen-
tral office of the Detroit Ordnance
District, U. S. Army, through which
is coordinated all the work of the
major war industries in this district.
And time is short!.
But when war production in Mich-
igan is reported way ahead of sched-
ule, you can bet that the Detroit
Ordnance District is more than just
a little responsible for it, as that or-
ganization is one of 14 national dis-
tricts currently engaged in the co-
ordination of key war industries so
as to obtain maximum ordnance pro-
duction at minimum cost and time.
1,400 Employed
Already employing more than 1,400
persons throughout the state and oc-
cupying some 42,000 square feet of of-
fice space on four floors of the Na-
tional Bank Building in Detroit alone,
the office is even now getting ready
to take over additional space.
But even greater than the need for
space, according to Capt. Ervin
Greenbaum, of the U. S. Army and
head of the General Service of the
District, "is the need for e~gineers,
ordnance inspectors, accountants and
business administration students."
Because of increased defense pro-
duction' and, more recently, war pro-
duction, the facilities of the office
have been greatly expanded; and this
expansion will continue. a 'long as
the emergency lasts, Captain Green-
baum -stated.
Surveys Maintained.
In time of peace the office is pri-
marily concerhed with maintaining,
through industrial surveys, reliable
records of sources of supply for ord-
nance material when an emergency
arises. And when that emergency does
come, the work of the office is ex-
panded manyfold.'
Adequate and up-to-date technical
data and display samples are avail-
able in the District office in Detroit,
and are of great assistance in the
negotiation and processing of con-
tracts for ordnance material assigned
to the District for procurement.
Not included in the files kept by the'
Planning Division of the Procurement
Service, smaller industries are re-
ferred to the District display room,
where they may study separately the
myriad 'component parts of ordnance
material and decide what they are
capable of producing.
Materials Inspected
The contracting having been ac-
complished'by the Procurement Serv-
ice, the Industrial Service then takes
over, becoming responsible for in-
spection of all ordnance material
procured in the District. A produc-
tion follow-up system insures delivery
in accordance with the schedule.
Comprising the Industrial Service
are the material divisions, sub-divid-
ed into ammunition, artillery, tank
and combat vehicles, small arms, ma-
chine gun and miscellaneous pro-
duction; and the gauge division,

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which sees to the accuracy of the
gauges used in ordnance inspection.
Final large branch of the District
is the General Service, under which
operates an Administrative Division,
Fiscal Division, Personnel" Division
and Supply Division. And with the
office continually expanding as the
war continues, this branch is par-
ticularly hard pressed.
Engineers Needed
One of Captain Greenbaum's big-
gest worries for the present is find-
ing eight Senior Engineers, to start
work at $4,600 a year, eight Engineers
at $3,800 a year, 14 Associate Engi-
neers at $3,200 a year and all the
inspectors he can get.
As an added inducement, it was
observed that promotions are made
on the basis of ability only, and there
is absolutely no "time" element in
advancement. If a man proves he
capable of handling additional'
sponsibilities, he will be promoted,
it was revealed.
Graduates On Duty
Already a nest of Michigan gradu-
ates, the office employs 13 reserve
officers on extended active duty and
eight Junior Engineers who have
come from the -University. And it is
hoped that these numbers will be
greatly increased by members of the,
February graduating class.
"We need men," Captain Green-
baum reported. "At present we need
more than we can get, and we'll need:
employes in ever-increasing numbers
until the end of the emergency."
Proof, of the authen~ticity of this
statement lies in the fact that the
office now has three men working
full time interviewing job candidates.

in
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Any University students interested
working in the Detroit office may
Main additional information from
an Ivan. C. Crawford of the Col-
e of Engineering or from Prof. R.
Sherlock of the civil engineering
partment.

LAST CHANCE TO GET INSURANCE
WITHOUT A WAR RISK CLAUUSE
PROVIDENT MUTUAL LIrE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPIHIA
FRANCIS J. CONLIN First National Bunld,,in
Offlce: 2-4282 Residence: 7005

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CHURCH
DIRECTORY

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Language Courses
Face All-Out War
The war will enter the Romance.
Languages department next semes-
ter when special courses will be given
advanced students in French and
Spanish in order to prepare them for
service'in the government war effort,
Prof. Hayward Keniston, chairman of
the department, announced yester-
'day.
.Stressing the strategic importance
of foreign languages to a country at
war, Prof. Keniston stated that there
is a definite need for work in tran-
scription of broadcasts and inter-
preting.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Location: .State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonar A. Parr.
Director of Student Activities: Mrs. Vera
Bucknell Thompson.
10:45 A.M. Christmas services will be held in tse
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre of the Michigan
League. Dr. Parr, will preach the sermon,
"What is Left of the Christnas Gospel?"
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Place of meeting: Y.M.C.A. Building,
110 N. Fourth Ave..
10:00 A.M. There will a study of various portions
of the Bible, namely, Isiah 9:6. 7 John 1:
1-4, 10-14. John 4: 9-11. The general theme
is to by "The Coming of God's Son."
11:00 A.M. The morning Worship will include the
singing of hymns prayer, and the Lord's
Supper. In addition there will be delivered a
sermon on the subpect: "God's Attitude To-
ward Sin," the text of which is to be from
the Bible, Romans 1: 18: "For the wrath of
God is revealed from heavbn against all un-
godliness and unrighteousness of men, who
hinder the truth in unrighteousness."
7:30 P.M. 'ghe evening service, for which the
sermon topic will be "The Error of Balaam"
from an interesting narrative of the Old
Testament.
Wednesday, December 24.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

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HAPPY
HOLIDAY
/1. i
mn m

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JAMES SALiN
STEPHENSON FITZGERALD
DONALD CRISP' BARBARA O'NEIL
Direted by From a Ploy by
IRVING RAPPER A. J. CRONIN
AUTHOR Of "THE CtTADEL
Also
"West of the Rockies"
Elmer's Pet Rabbitt
News of the Day

Week Days 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Tbday and Saturday
WHAT EVERY W6MAN NEEDS!...

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!{

10:15 A.M. The Church at Study.
11:00 A.M. The Church at Worship. Sermon,
"Christmas Ponderings."
6:30 P.M. The Roger Williams Guild will not
meet.
7:00 P.M. The High School Youth Fellowship
will meet in the Church for a Christmas pro-
gram.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
sponsoredJ'ointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches
Zion Lutheran Church,n
E. Washington St. at S. Fifth Ave.

;/

512 East Huron 4
C. H. Loucks, Minister
'Mrs. Geil Orcutt, Associate

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State Street between Washington and Huron
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares and
J. Edward Lantz
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director
Mary Eleanor Porter, organist
10:40 A.M'. Church School for nursery, begin-
ners, and primary departments. Young child-
ren may be left in these departments during
worship service.
10:4" A.M. Worship Service. Dr. Brashares' 'sub-
ject is "This Christmas."
16:30 P.M. Wesleyan Guild. Tea in the Ldunge.
Then attend Christmas program in the Social
Hall at 7:30.
7:30 P.M. Christmas Service. Carols led by Dr.
Brashares.. Worship service conducted by Mrs.
Peter Stair. A Christmas Fantasy "The Great
Guest Came," by Lionel Adams.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister
Mark W. Bills, Director of Music
Franklin Mitchell, Organist
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups. Mr. and Mrs. Class meets in Piggott
Parlor.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. "Vestments of
God," sermo by Dr. Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nur ry during morning worship.
6:00 P.M. Tuxis Soiiety will meet for Christ-
mas 'progra~m and social hour.
UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
H. P. Marley, Minister
Friday - 6:15, Mexican Christmas Fiesta.
Colored pictures, music and readings in Span-
ish. Mexican food.
Sunday - 5:30 P.M. Candlelight Vesper Serv-;
ice. Christmas music and poetry - dedication
of infants.
EVANGELICAL STUDENTS' LEAGUE
Rev. Leonard Verduin, pastor.
Michigan League Chapel
Sunday, December 21.
10:30 A.M. "The Lord Will Suddenly Come to
His Temple," (Malachi 3:1).
7:30 P.M. "The First Noel" (Luke 2:10-14).
ST. ANDRE'W'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis. (Rector
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Student
Chaplain
The Rev. John G. Dahl, Curate
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
10:00 A.M. High School Class.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten, Harris Hall.
11:00 A.M. Junior Church.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
4:00 P.M. High Square Club Meeting, Harris
Hall. Speaker' Mr. Paul Lim-Yuen.
6:00 P.M. Supper, Harris Hall for University
students. Call 8613 for reservations.
7:30 P.M.. Christmas Pageant. Music by the
Mens and Boys' Choir.
CHRISTMAS EVE, December 24.
5:00 P.M. Christmas Carol Service.

Student Counselor

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0:30 A.M. Church Worship Service. Sermon,
/ "Wherein to Glory" by Rev. E. C. Stellhorn.
Christmas Program by the Church School
Christmas Eve. Christmas Day service at
10:30 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church,
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave. ,
10:30 A.M. Church Worship Service. Sermon,
"A Christian's Christmas." Christmas Pro-
gram of the Church School Sunday evening
at 6:30. ChristmasEve - Candlelight Service
at 11:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 5S. Division St.
Wednesday enmng service at 7:30.
Sunday morning servic .at 10:30, subject, "Is
the Universe, Including Man, Evolved by

- Coming Sunday -
WALTER HUSTON
WALTER BRENNAN

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