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December 16, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TV

New 'Technic'
Will Feature
White's Article
Engineering Publication
Contains Contributions
Of Hawley,_Burnham
Sale Is Tomorrow
Featuring an article on "The Ro-
mance of Research" by Prof. A. E.
White, director of the Bureau qf En-
gineering Research, a 36-page De-
cember issue of The Michigan Tech-
nic will go on sale at 8 a.m. tomorrow
over the Engineering Arch, in the
lobby of the East Engineering Build-
ing, and near the secretary's office,
West Engineering Building.
Other select articles in this pre-
vacation issue will include "Testing'
Domestic Stoker Coals" by Prof. R. S.
Hawley of the mechanical engineering
depatrtent and "Broaching Rifling
in Gir Barrels" by John S. Burnham,
'42E.
In addition to Burnham, student
contributors will be ASME president
'John Templer, '42E, who has written
an article on the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, and Robert
Summerhays, '42E, with his story on
the Engineering Council.
New to this issue of The Technic
will be a feature, "The Technic Ram-
bles," presenting an interview with
Afhur Limpert of the naval archi-
tecture department, who builds all
the model boats which are dragged
through the naval tank in testing
operations.
Continuing its policy of presenting
prominent engineering students and
faculty members, The Technic this
month with introduce George D. Gots-
chall, '42E, Bill Collamor, '428, and
Prof. George G. Brown of the chemi-
cal engineering department.

Military Drill, War Declaration
Backed By Students In 1917
(Editor's Note: This is the second in
a series of articles dealing with stu- attended a rally at which the prin
dents' activities during the period of cipal speakers were Henry L. Stimsor
the first world war. The Michigan ex-secretary of war and Dr. Fred
Daily files of 1917 furnished the in- erick R. Condert, authority on inter
formation.)nn t nnnl ln,

z-
n,
d-
r-

By EUGENE MANDEBERG
March 31, 1917. Following the stu-
dent vote in favor of military train-
ing it was provided that all students
who signed up for drill would be
trained by regular army officers, us-
ing regular uniforms and equipment,
supplied without cost to the trainees.
The University expected that from
500 to 1000 would take the training
course following spring vacation. All
training was placed on a voluntary
basis because there were not ade-
quate housing facilities to barrack all
male students.
It was also decided that if a stu-
dent enlisted in military or naval'
services during a semester, he was to
be given full semester credit, provided
his record was good.
The Union offered the University
the use of its entire building and
property as barracks for those in
training.
April 3. More than 5,500 people
Bell Will Represent
State In Emergency
efenseMeeting
Dr. Margaret Bell, Chairman of the
Department of Physical Education
and regional representative of the
Office of Civilian Defense for Physi-
cal Fitness, will leave, for an emer-
gency meeting of the national office
to be held Dec. 17 and 18 at Chicago.
Michigan will be represented by
prominent people in sports, at the
conference which will be presided over
by Alice Marble. Coach Crisler, Di-
rector of Athletics of the University;I
Dr. Charles Forsythe, Director of
Interscholastic Athletics of the Michi-
gan Department of Public Instruc-
tion; and Lou Hollaway, Director of
Physical Education in Ann Arbor'
will attend the meeting.
Vaughn Blanchard, Director of
Health and Physical Education of the
Detroit Public Schools; Clare Brewer,
Director of Parks and Recreatibn of
Detroit; and'K. J. McCristal, Presi-
dent of the Michigan Association for
Health, Physical Education and Rec-
reation for East Lansing will be, the
other representatives at the meeting.

naiona aw.
Results of the rally showed that
the student body favored an imme-
diate declaration of war. And in the
same edition President Wilson's re-
commended resolution was quoted,
stating that the responsibility for any
action rested with Germany.
April 4. Medical school courses
were to be made continuous through
the simmer so that the students could
graduate and go directly into the
medical corps.
Four student. companies for drill
were organized on the campus.
April 5. The two biggest headlines
in The Daily read:
SENATE PASSES WAR MOTION
Athletic Board Cancels
Games of Varsity Teams
On this day too, 1200 men respond-
ed to drill call, and the editorial
page's leading editorial concerned an
engineering course to prepare men for
ROTC examinations.
Arrangements were made for men
living on South State St. to drill dur-
ing the noon hour, and miss their
lunch.
April 6. This was the last paper
before Easter vacation.
The majority of the student body
was leaving, but some volunteered to
remain on campus during vacation
and drill.

Pearl Harbor
Damage Less
Than Feared
Congressmen Feel Relief
At Statement By Knox,
But Blame 'Negligence'
WASHINGTON, Dec: 15- W) -
Many members of Congress said today
the damage at Pearl Harbor was less
than they had feared and they ex-
pressed satisfaction over Secretary
Knox's statement that much of the
fleet was now at sea seeking contact
with the enemy.
But chairman Connally (Dem.-
Tex.) of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee said:,
"The statement that neither the
Navy nor the Army was on the alert
at Hawaii when it was attacked by
the Japanese is amazing. It is as-
tounding. It is almost unbelievable.
"The Navy of John Paul Jones and
that of Dewey must wear crepe. The
old Army must carry an arm band.
While the report as to destruction of
naval craft is not as bad as first re-
ports, the loss of life is staggering.
"The naval commander and army
general should be investigated vigor-
ously. Theirs is the responsibility and
it ought to be determined whether1
either or both are inefficient or crim-
inally negligent. They must be one or
the other.
"I have always been a big-Navy
man. I have always supported the
strongest possible Navy. I have al-
ways wanted the 4most powerful Navy
in the world. I am pained and grieved
at its seeming failure of its high
duty."
Senator Chandler (Dem.-Ky.), a
member of the Military Affairs Com-
mittee, said he was relieved that the
losses in ships were not greater than
enumerated by Knox.
"If that is all we have lost,".Chand-
ler told reporters, "we ought to be able
to take the offensive right away, ac-
cording to long time plans of action."

Congress . . .
(Continued from Page 1)
that men from 19 to 44, inclusive, be
subject to induction, but Chairman
May (Dem.-Ky.) said the Commit-
tee believed an Army of more than 1
6.000.000 could be obtained from men
in the 21 to 45 age brackets.
The House Rules Committee opened1
the way for floor debate, probably;
tomorrow, on an Omnibus Bill which
would reenact the World War "trad-
ing with the enemy" act, give the
Chief Executive 'authority to redis-t
tribute, the work of Government
agencies and provide short cuts inj
letting war contracts.
Attorney General Biddle was re-.
ported to have told a Senate com-
mittee behind closed doors that a
comparable bill would establish a
censorship over outgoing, but not in-
coming foreign communications. He
said no domestic censorship was con-
templated under that legislation.
The House Naval Committee sent
to the floor a bill authorizing a 150,-
000-ton expansion in the fleet. The
Navy last week asked for a 900,000
ton increase but Chairman Vinson
(Dem.-Ga.) of the Committee said
officials had decided that facilities
were available only for construction
of the, smaller tonnage..
KnoX. ..
(Continued from Page 1)
cers and 636 men were listed as
wounded.
The ratio of dead was heavy, Knox
explained, bpcause some ships rolled
over.
"I think the most effective fifth
column work of the entire war was
done in Hawaii, with the possible
exception of Norway," Knox said.
Responding to reporters' ques-
tions, Knox said:
He believed between 150 and 300
planes took part in the attack-too
many to come from a single aircraft
carrier.
The attacks apparently were made
only by single-engined planes and
apparently none was land-based.
As far as known, none was flown
by Germans, and no new weapons
of any kind made their appearance.
Knox declined to say whether the
Navy had known of the existence of
the two-man submarines.
,ry docks escaped damage, he
said, as did all oil storage and other
important base facilities.
The Secretary said the Arizona
went down from a "lucky hit."
(The Arizona was built in the New
York Navy Yard and launched June
19, 1915, a 32,600-ton ship of the
Pennsylvania class. Its normal com-
plement was 1,358 officers and men.
It carried, according to Jane's fight-
ing ships, 12 14-inch guns, 12 5-inch
guns and eight 5-inch anti-aircraft
weapons, as well as three aircraft. It
cost $7,425,000.

America At War' To Be Thene
Of Annual Senate Winter Parley

By DAN BEHRMAN
University students have been stor-
ing up lots of steam ever since Tokyo
lit the fire nine days ago.
They'll be able to blow off some of
it and contribute to a valuable cam-
pus forum January 16-17. when the!
Student Senate conducts its annual
Winter Parley with "America At War"
as the discussion theme.
At a meeting yesterday called by
Chairman Jack Edmonson, the par-
ley committee set up four main topics
for student-faculty panels to be chos-
en later. Greater student participa-
tion in the discussions was stressed by
the entire committee.
The first topic, as outlined by qam
Russell, '42, program chairman, will
be concerned with the economic prob-
lems of wartime production. The sub-
ject will be taken up from three dif-
ferent viewpoints; labor, business and
the consumer. Deferred wages, the
right to strike, the precarious posi-
tion of small business, and the ever-
darkening storm-front of inflation
will probably be major items of de-
bate.
The second and most personally
important panel will deal with edu-
cation in wartime. Such immediate
questions as defense training, the con-
tinuance of universities, and the prob-
lem of degreemen shouldering a pack
and rifle will be encouraged by the
discussion leaders.
The war on morals, admittedly as
dangerous as any surprise Pearl Har-
bor attack, will be the subject of the
NOW!
A UDETTE
SK(YLARKS
with two mere~
Cat' aftime!

third forum group. Split into two
headings, this topic will deal with
religious-ethical issues and then dis-
cuss war-time infringement on civil
rights, treatment of aliens and citi-
zens of "enemy" descent, and criti-
cism of administrative policies.
While the general topic of our
armed forces has been set for the
fourth panel, specific discussion will
hinge upon the outcome of military
events at the parley date in January,
Perspec ives Issue
Will BePostponed
For various reasons, printing of the
coming issue of Perspectives. Univer-
sity literary magazine, has been post-
poned and will not be finished until
soon after the Christmas holidays.
Since some of the editors of the
literary supplement are also members
of The Daily editorial staff, work on
Perspectives has been continually in-
terrupted during the past two weeks
to push the completion of the Christ-
mas and defense supplements to the
paper, and to take care of innova-
tions necessary in giving the campus
complete coverage of the war.
MICHIGAN
NOW SHOWING!
jtS G ' i 'hel
the
f strip.
0 a fomte hest

Russia .

0 "

Art Exhibition'
Student's 'City

To Featuire
Landscape,

One of the highest honors which
can come to an artist has been re-
ceived by Tristan Meinecke, '42A.
The Art Institute of Chicago has
invited Meinecke's painting, "City
Landscape" (now at the Detroit In-
situte of Arts) to appear in its In-
ternational Exhibition of Water Col-
ors, to be held from May 14 to August
23, 1942.

(Continued from Page 1)
sian blizzards and sub-zero tem-
peratures.
Ski-shod Soviet troops penetrated
German lines to blow up Nazi block-
houses; guerrillas still played havoc
with extended Nazi communication
lines, and the frozen approaches to
Moscow were littered with Nazi dead
and abandoned material.
Besides Klin the recapture of
Yasnaya Polyana, the birthplace of
the great Russian novelist Tolstoi,
was announced. That town is south-
west of Tula on the southern anchor
of the Moscow front. Dedliovo and
Bogoroditsk in the same area also
were retaken.
A total of 42 settlements were over-
run by the Russians in the Klin sec-
tor, the Communist Party organ
Pravda said, and 75 German tanks
were seized.
All this was accompanied by offi-
cial accounts of other widespread
offensive action which had the a-
vowed aim not merely of hurling the
invader out of Russia, but of destroy-
ing his last battalion before he could
get out.
Somewhere about Leningrad, 18
villages and towns-one of them an
important point identified only as
"M"-were declared back in Russian
hands.

Roosevelt

. r

.

i
Ik

(Continued from Page 1)

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Ii

President declared firmly, only if
those who inherited the gift of lib-
erty "had lost the manhood to pre-
serve it."
The determination of this genera-
tion to preserve liberty, he declared,
is as fixed and certain as that of an
earlier generation of Americans to
win it.
"We covenant with each other be-
fore all the world," Mr. Roosevelt
asserted, "that having taken up arms
in the defense of liberty, we will not
lay them down before liberty is once
again secure in the world we live in.
For that security we Pray; for that
security we act-now and forever
more."
No date in the history of freedom
means more to liberty-loving men in
all liberty-loving countries than the
15th of December, 1791, the Chief
Executive said.

j
Claudette Colbert '
Ray Milland
Brian Aherne.
Also
Cartoon - World News

BETTY GRABLE
VICTOR MATURE
CAROLE LANDIS
LAIRD CREGAR
Cinl

I

!'y

.P

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Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
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composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
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TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
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MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
60c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
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public Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis bind-
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WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
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SOUND-RECORDING STUDIO
Voice - Instrumental - Conversational
messages for Christmas presents.
For information telephone 3100.
162c

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
WANTED
SKIS and skiing equipment for per-
sonal use. Write Box 10, Michigan
Daily. Give height, sizes, price
wanted. 174c
FOR SALE
ENGISH SETTERS, female. Spring-
er Spaniel, male. Make fine gifts.
3005 Plymouth Rd. Phone 5132.
CANARIES-Beautiful singers, love-
birds, cockatiels, finches; bird sup-
jlies, cages. 562 S. Seventh. Phone
5330. 173c
FOR SALE - Remington Noiseless
Portable typewriter. $30. Phone
Dave Lachenbrfch, 2-26-24, after
5 p.m.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to Chicago early
Friday A.M., Dec. 19. Share gas
bill.-Phone 2-4224. 175c
DRIVING THRU to Texas, Arizona
and Colorado, Sat., Dec. 20. 1941
IOldsmobile. Share expenses with
1 or 2 passengers. Ph. 3031. 176c
CARS FOR CALIFORNIA. No wait-
ing for responsible parties. Suite
1160, 5050 Cass Ave., Detroit. Tele-
phone CO 0100.
WANT ED-PASSENGERS TO NEW
YORK! Passengers to Chicago.
Ride to Buffalo. Ride to Pitts-
burgh. These are typical wants of
students during the pre-holiday
period. Why not advertise in The
Daily for passengers or cars going
your way? We reach everyone
you're trying to reach !
BUSINESS SERVICES J
FOR RUG AND CARPET CLEANING
work this vacation, call Edward
Kelly, 6051 mornings, or 2-4389 af-
ter 1 p.m.

i

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Albany ....
Binghamton
Boston ...
Buffalo . ...
Chicago
Cleveland.
New York..

WILLIAM GARGAN
ALAN MOWBRAY
ALLYN JOSLYN
A 20th CENTURY-FOX PICTURE

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16.28
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10.45
12.18

Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

................

Chris huas Gift
We a re showing a wide assort-
CRANE, MONTAG, EATON,
and others. Pastel Colors.
Borders .. . Whites.
Priced to Suit Your Pocketbook
Wahr's Bookstores
';# 316 S. State 105 N, Main k ...

a

Rochester.....

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Syracuse
Utica .

Washington

15.02

MICHIGAN
ALAN
DINEHART *

One Night
Only
Thurs.

Jan. 8th.

* TALBOTN

I

*Round Trip - Federal Tax Included
Full price of ticket payable in advance.
ALL BUSSES LEAVE ON FRIDAY,
DECEMBER 19
MICHIGAN UNION
TRAVEL BUREAU
Rates quoted above are based on the sale of 1-0 or more tickets
to any one point (except Buffalo, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Chicago,
_ -I AT -- v tr -.1_ L -- .- .__ - \ r f-- tr T L__-- "t _-__

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