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November 30, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEI

Christmas Bureau Organized;
Will Steer Fnuds To Needy

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Dorms, Groups, Schools
Urged To Use Bureau
For CharityPurposes
By CLAYTON DICKEY
The Christmas Bureau, orga ized
for centralized guidance of Christmas
giving in Ann Arbor, was Opened yes-
terday by a group of volunteer 'citi-
zens.
Operating under the auspices of
the Council of Social Agencies, the
new organization will, collaborate
with group and individual donors to
ascertain families in need of help
;and to prevent duplication in the ful-
fillment of their needs, thus bringing
about an equitable distribution of
Christmas charity.
SFor this purpose the Bureau will
keep confidential records compiled
from information supplied by social
'ageticies in close contact with fami-
'lies throughout the year.
All Campus To Help
Dormitories, sororities, fraternities,
schools, clubs and other organizations
are urged to use the Bureau as a
means of checking the needs of spe-
cific families and of avoiding dupli-
cation.. Although the Bureau has just
opened, many organizations have al-
ready pledged their support, among

them the University residence halls
and the Panhellenic Association.
Five committees will carry on the
work of the Bureau: executive, head-
ed by Mrs. Walter B. Maurice; case,
Mrs. Z. Clark Dickinson; publicity.
Mrs. Alfred Connable; recruiting,
Mrs. Finley Riggs; distribution, Mrs.
Robert Granville.
"Perhaps, in this world crisis, the
most important contribution of this
effort is a recognition that family
solidarity is essential to civilian mor-
ale," Mrs. Maurice declared. "Con-
vinced of the value of family security
in retaining the American way of
life, it is our hope that we can ar-
range donations so that parents can
play the role of giver. Everything
should be done to allow parents to
perform their normal functions in
family life--strengthening family
ties and building toward solidarity."

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Co-Op To Be Discussed
A meeting will be held at 10:30 a.m.
today at the Alice Palmer House,'
1511 Washtenaw, for all girls inter-
asted in discussing plans for a new
!ooperative house, it was announced
'y Fern Rice, '43, head of the wo-
'pren's personnel committee of the
Intercooperative Council.

Hi ghighii uts
On Campus
Today .i0
British Labor Adviser
To Visit ..,
An adviser to British Ministry of
Labour on women's training, Caro-
line Haslett will be in Ann Arbor to-
morrow for a League luncheon with
members of Dean Lloyd's University
committee on national defense.
Miss Haslett, who is also a leading
authority on electrical engineering
and editor of The Electrical Hand-
book For Women, has been active in
orienting European exiles in British
society. Her Ministry of Labour post
requires her to pass on questions
affecting the recruiting and regis-
tration of women for' war emergency,
work.
Chemist Leaves
For Exposition.--.
Dr. H. H. Willard of the Depart-
ment of Chemistry, has gone to New
York City to represent the Univer-
sity at the eighteenth Exposition of
Chemical Industries.
The Exposition, which will be held
from Dec. 1 to Dec. 6 in the Grand
Central Palace, will contiin exhibits
from virtually all of the chemical in-
dlustry in the United States. It will
be highlighted by emphasis on chem-
istry's part in nationa defense.
Bunting To Attend
convention..--
Dr. R. N. Bunting will be in at-
tendance at the next meeting of the
Pan-American Odontalo ical Asso-
ciation, which is to take place in
New York City on Dec. 3. Dr. Bunt-
ing is Dean of the School of Dentistry
in this 'University.1
, 1* *
Prof. Robert S. Ford of the eco-
nomics department will attend the
annual meeting of the American Tax
Institute in Philadelphia Monday
and Tuesday.

War Or Peace Is UP To Japan
U.S. Tells Tokyo Any Expansion Of Military Domain
May Mean Armed Opposition Of This Country

By HOMER SWANDER

By RICHARD L. TURNER
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29.-(The
Special News Service)-The question
of peace or war between the United
States and Japan now rests with
Tokyo. As was to have been expected,
efforts to adjust the clashing poli-
cies of the two nations proved futile.
The Japanese have been told again,
directly or indirectly, that if they
attempt to expand their military do-
main farther, they risk the armed
opposition of this country.
Whether they will be deterred is a
grave question, and dispatches from
the Orient telling of increased Jap-
anese military operations in French
Indo-China, and reporting an immi-
nent Japanese invasion of Thailand
would seem to indicate that at the
very least grave and anxious days lie
ahead.1.1
Move Causes Speculation
What the Japanese hoped to ac-
complish, in the first place, b' send-
ing their special envoy, Saburo Kur-
usu, here for a discussion of the
problem has intrigued Washington
conversationalists from the start. The
situation had already reached a stage
at which agreement Was possible on-
ly if one, country or the otl'er would
back down.
He came, moreover, under circum-
stances which hardly augured well
for the success of his mission. At the
time of his departure the govern-
ment-controlled Japanesehpress was
laying down ultimatums for America.
-listing Japanese demands which
America must accept or "face the al-
ternatives," as one paper put it. The
Jingoistic barrage continued at in-
tervals during his stay here.
The demands which the papers
listed -including such things as
American efforts to end Chinese re-
sistance, and a stop to American as-
sistance to China-were, of course,
completely unacceptable here.
Kurusu Fails To Impress Officials
They, and Kurusu's bland state-
ment upon his arrival, that so great
was the "sympathy" of the American
people for Japan that he had a
chance of success, left officials un-
moved publicly, and privately more
than a little amused. There never
was a chance of the negotiations suc-
ceeding. Events had moved too far
for that.
These events began years ago, when
Herbert Hoover was president and
Henry L. Stimson was Secretary of
State. Japan sent her armies into
Manchuria. Stimson attempted to

form a united British-American front
in opposition to such conquest, but
was rebuffed by the British.
By successive steps. Japanese con-
quest spread. Japan became a mem-
aer of the Axis and signed a pactE
with Rome and Berlin which was
aimed directly at the United States.
This country was practising a form
of appeasement, letting the Japanese
guy needed commodities here, in the
hope of keeping them pacified.
However, when Hitler sent his
armies into Russia, the whole picture
was changed,
PERSPECTIVES DEADLINE
The final deadline for accept-
ance of manuscript for the next
issue of Perspectives, University
literary magazine, has been ex-
tended to 5 p.m. tomorrow, the
editors announce.
This issue, to be published on!
the last Sunday preceding vaca-
tion, is to be the last of this sem-
ester. Manuscripts-short stories,
essays, book reviews or poetry-
may .e left in the English office
or at the Perspectives desk in the
Publications Building.

In a driving finish which outdid
even Hollywood itself the sophomores
for the first time in years defeated a
numerically stronger freshman team
in the annual Class Games yesterday.
Going into the last event on the
program-a mass water polo game--
the sophomores found themselves fac-
ing 24 freshmen, 22 of whom are on
the yearling swimming team." Al-
though they were ten points ahead at
the time, the sophs had to win the
final event to come out on top.
And then, before they scarcely real-
ized the game was on, the frosh scored
Iwo quick goals. But in an amazing
comeback, the bewildered Class of '44
settled down andttwice drove through
:heir opponents to tie the score.
With the game ending even up the
referee decided to give each side five
points, making the final score 60 to
!>0 in favor of the sophomores.
The entire program stood out be-
cause of the fine sportsmanship shown
by everyone who participated. There
was plenty of yelling, plenty of spirit,
plenty of fight--but all of it in good,,
clean fun.
As evidence that there existed no
real animosity between the two class-a

es was the way they cooperated at the
end of the meet to throw Bob Bur-
stein, '43, the Union representative
in charge, into the pool.
The Class of '44 will be the first
class to have its name inscribed upon
the Holy Plaque, an innovation this
year. Large and shaped like a shield,
the plaque is to be placed in the
Union showcase and each year will
have the name of the winner put on it.
The program climaxed a full week
of vigorous activity on the part of
both classes, with the sophomores
showing more enthusiasm than any
similar class has shown in recent
years.
Shortly before the meet was to get
under way 100 frosh from the West
Quad marched into the I-M Building
chanting "Hurrah for '45-To Hell
with '44." Other members of the class
arrived singly or in groups until there
were almost 200 or them present.
It took about half this number of
sophomores to show that the jinx
which has followed sophomore classes
for year can be beaten.
An au ence of approximately 100
composed of parents, coeds and up-
perclassmen were on hand to see the
two groups of underclassmen tie into
each other.

So pis Make Last Minute Drive
To Upset Freshmen fit Gaines

Sunday at the Wolverine
209 SOUTH STATE
Cream of Mushroom Soup or Choice of Grapefruit or Tomato Juice
Celery, Olives
Roast Young-Stuffed Chick n with Cranberry Sauce
or Grilled Sirloin Steak
French Fried or Mashed Potatoes 9
Buttered Whole Kernal Corn or June Peas
Florida Fruit or Head Lettuce and Tomato Salad
with 1,000 Island -Dressing
Coffee, Tea, Milk Ice Cream
Hot Rolis and Butter
Serving Hours 12:15 to 2:00t
Guest Price 'C Member Price 40c

A

GREENE'S
will
Re-Site
your
.FormalIs!

I 'T%". MR..."- IT.-.. fT4,-1 -4f In, -- ,-I,

....

I t

_r. Mary v anr i uyi, o te psy-
chology department, will discuss the
subject "Shall We Pray?" during the
Congregational Student Fellowshipt
meeting at 7:15 p.m. today in the
church parlors.
A All students are invited to attend
Fthe regular afternoon teas from to
A &h(?1 5 p.m. each Tuesday at Pilgrim Aall.

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AN ALBUM 01 GLORIOUS MUSIC

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Conducted by ORMANDY
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ENESCO'S ROUMANIAN RHAPSODY NO.
in album - $2.62

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HELP WANTED
MAN STUDENT to assist in care of
invalid man, afternoons and nights.
Call at Room 106, Chemistry Bldg.
GIRL STUDENT -to stay in faculty
home Christmas vacation. Three
in family. Phone 6024. 150c
LOST and FOUND
REWARD-for black kid gloves, red
trim. Lost at League. Mrs. A. E.
White-2110 Dorset. 148c

FOR SALE
ONE TUXEDO SUIT, new, tailor-
made, chest size 37, waist 32, price
$25.00. Call at 1325 Main St., Lan-
sing, between 5 and 9. 151c
WANTED
MALE STUDENT share apartment
with two others, now or next se-
mester. No dishwashing. Room,
board, $5 week. Call 2-3439 to ar-
range. 149c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
NURSERY
?RIVATE DAY NURSERY: Children,
4 years and under, cared for at
hours 'convenient to parent. Also
short-time boarding facilities. Out-
side play yard with playground
equipment. Phone 8293, Grace
Powers. 315 E. William.
WANTED TO BUY
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 5c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING -Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
MIMEOGRAPHING AND MULTI-
GRAPHING-illustrated and typed
Work for fraternities and other stu-
dent organizations. 1 cent postage
on alumni mailings. The Edwards
Letter Shop, 711 N. University,
Phone 2-2846. 8c
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
90c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION

"JEWELRY-THE PERFECT GIFT
r ] 1 a1nt' s or womlnnts Christmas
Few =women can resist the
charm and grace of our Faith
lcekets. Stylish and heatit-
fully designed, they make the
perfect Christmas gift.
d.
The sparkle and beauty of a DIAMOND RING is
irresistable to any woman. Set in the latest style
mountings, they are tops in both quality and price.
One of massive GOLD RINGS with their finely c t
stones would make a most pleasing gift for that
certain man.
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Radio & Record Shop
715 N. University Ave. Phone 3542
North End ('f Diagonal

SCHAEFFER "Commodore" (brown-
gold sunburst) fountain pen. Lost
Wednesday night. Reward. June
McKee-Martha Cook. 145c

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