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November 30, 1941 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

I

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 6)

study on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited.
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will meet this afternoon at 4:30
p.m. in the Fireside Room of Lane
Hall. All students are cordially in-
vited to be present.I
The Unity Meetings which have
previously been held in the League,
N will meet in the Students' Reading
Rooms, 310 S. State St., Room 31, at
7:30 Monday evenings.
Latter-day Saints: The Mutual
Improvement Association will meet
at 8:00 o'clock in Lane Hall today.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church: Bible
Class at 9:30 a.m. Albert Streufert,
M.A., leader. Morning worship serv-
ice at 10:45 a.m. Advent sermon by
the Rev. C. A. Brauer. Subject: "The
King Rides On."
The Rev. Reuben W. Hahn of Chi-,
cago, Executive Secretary of the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee of the Luth-,
eran Church, will be the speaker at
the Gamma Delta Student Club
meeting at 6:45 p.m. Fellowship
supper at 6:00 p.m. Synodical Con-
ference Lutherans are cordially in-
vited.

Dr.F.A.Stock
Directs Choral
Concert Today
An orchestra, whose fame is world-
wide, with a conductor whose abilities
are legendary will be heard by local
music-lovers when the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra under the direction
of Dr. Frederick A. Stock presents
the fifth Choral Union concert at 3
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Rated by most music critics as one
of the world's leading orchestras, the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra has
been a consistent performer in Ann
Arbor, having appeared here annual-
ly in the May Festivals from 1905 to
1935 and in a Choral Union concert
in 1937.
Dr. Stock will lead the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra in the following
selections today:
Suite No. 2 in B minor, for strings
and flute, by Bach.
"On the Shores of Sorrento," from
Symphonie Fantasia, "Aus Italien,"
Op. 16 by Strauss.
Fant sia, "Francesca da Rimini,"
Op. 32, by Tschaikowsky.
Variations on an Original Theme,
Op. 36, by Elgar.
Capriccio Espagnol, Op. 34, by
Rimsky-Korsakoff.

Characters Will Wear Paper Masks

In

Blue Bird' For Realistic Effect

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Facial Contours Of Witch,
Cat, Dog Are Matched
By Professor Halstead
By GLORIA NISHON
For the first time in Play Produc-
tion history, the group will in its cur-
rent effort, Maeterlinck's "The Blue
Bird," attempt to achieve a semi-
realistic effect through the use of
masks on major characters.
Prof. William P. Halstead, direc-
tor of the Maeterlinck masterpiece
which will open Wednesday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, has
spent long, tedious hours, in complet-
ing the three masks that will be used
in a production requiring charac-
terizations of a dog, a cat and a
witch.
The first step in the work of cre-
ating unusual masks, explained. Pro-
fessor Halstead in an interview yes-
terday, is to cover the face of the
wearer-to-be with cold cream. This
serves to protect the skin and to
make it easy to lift the plaster cast
off the face. Tissue paper is placed
over the eyebrows and eyelashes so
it will not leave a hairless face when
the plaster is pulled off.
In applying the plaster of paris,
Professor Halstead does not use the
usual method of putting straws in
his subject's nose' to permit breath-
ing. Instead, he applies the plaster dra
very carefully around the nose so it the
does not clog up the nostrils. cre
Formation Of Negative in
Once the plaster has been applied, Ha
operations must cease for 12 to 15
minutes while the preparation dries.
When this is lifted off a perfect cast
of the face is obtained. This, in mask
terminology, is a negative.
The next step is to fill in the nos-
tril holes with clay or plastocine so
that there will be a complete cast in-
to which the plaster for the mold-or
positive-must be poured.
The positive is then obtained by '
breaking off the negative. On this
moldsis built up the mask which will
be used in the production. Instead
of the papier mache which is gener-
ally used, Professor Halstead has ;
used laminated paper for his work.Tpr
This is a porous paper which has
been soaked in water and coated
with a glue and paste mixture.
Are Partial Masks
Another innovation, so far as
masks used on this campus are con-
cerned, is the factthat all three of
them will be partial masks. This
has been necessary because the
characters who wear them are of
major importance, and freedom for
mouth apd chin are necessary for
clear speaking. "Full masks have
a tendency to blur the voice and
make it sound hollow," Professor
Halstead declared.
The 'partial masks will also make
it an easier task for the witch to
make her two-second onstage trans-
formation from the ugly old crone
to a beautiful young woman.

(A'-Mary Louise Thomas. 20, with
light brown hair and green eyes is
looking for another husband after
trying matrimony twice.
Her quest led her to the Evening
News with a classified ad which read:
"Wanted: A husband for girl of
20, with light brown hair, green eyes.
five feet five inches. weighing 105I
pounds. Fair complexioned, good
background and has a child 2' years
old. Man must be five feet nine

all spor~ts.,
Instead of carrying the ad, the
News appeared with her story, which
told of two marriages and two divorces
from the same man.
"I've worked at getting a husband
long enough," she explained. "Either
the men or I lack something."
Within a few houvs Mary Louise
received 22 telephone calls, two
special delivery letters and four per-
sonal calls.

Mate-Hunt Nets 28' Respouses
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Nov. 29.- inches or over, good provider and like

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Gifts that HINE
Choose gifts this year that are really outstanding.
May we offer these as suggestions:
Gaily printed dish towels
Cocktail and tea napkins Bridge and luncheon sets
Guest towels Handkerchiefs
"Always Reasonably Priced"
OAGE jLINEN xSHOPv
10 Nickels Arcade
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Here Professor Halstead is just beginning the process of making
amatic masks. He has removed the plaster of paris negative from
face of Btty Jane Schumann, Grad., but the protective coat of cold
-am may still be seen. Miss Schumann will play the part of the eat
the Maeterlinck production. After this initial procedure, Professor
dstead must wait about 15 minutes for the negative to dry.

4 1

SUNDAY SUPPER
Served in the Main Dining Room-6:00 until 7:30 o'clock

4
E:

Casserole of Italian Spaghetti,
with Chicken Livers
Pistachio Nut Ice Cream
or Chocolate Slices
Beverage

Cubed Steak Sandwich
(On Toasted Bun)
French Fried Potatoes
Pumpkin Pie or Ice Cream
Beverage

at fifty five cents

Fresh :,Mushroom Omelette
Grapefruit Salad
Caramel Sundae
or Pumpkin Pie
Beverage
at sixty five cents
NOVEMBER

Fruit Cocktail
Chicken a la King Pattie
Mashed Potatoes
Fresh Green Beans
Plum Pudding, Rum Sauce
or Pineapple Sundae
Beverage
at ei#hty-live cents
30, 1941

Reading I've L
1942 New Yo
Cortoon Revue
Treasury of Gi
The Opera -
Alfred I. Du P
Armies on Wh
Berlin Diary -
Keys of The. Ki
Saratoga Trun
Leaf In A Stor
Wild Is The Ri
Windswept -
Reveille In W
K
CHRISTMA
Thi
FC
STA

Liked -- Clifton Fadiman.
orker Album . .
- Peter Arno .
ilbert & Sullivan .
Brockway . .
ont - By Marquis James
eels - S. L. A. Marshall.
- William Shirer .

there's nothing like a
GOOD BOOK
General

a
a
-
a
a

Fiction

ngdom - Cronin1 .
k - Edna Ferber . ..
m - Lin Yutang .
iver - Bromfield . . .
Mary Ellen Chase . . .
ashington -' Margaret Leech

$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.75
$3.50

After all.. a

1 $3.00
$2.50
$2.00
$5.00
$3.75
$4.50
$2.50
$3.00

i

GAY CHRISTMAS WRAPPING
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

MICHIGAN UNION

AS CARDS, SEALS, and WRAPPINGS

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that inspire

is Christmas Give Books from

Giving!

This is the last stage in the making of dramatic masks. When
completed only make-up need be applied to give the final effect as
seen in the production. This mask, that of the dog in 'The Blue Bird,'
is here being fitted to Don Diamond, '42, by Director Halstead..The mask
is only partial, because a maximum amount of freedom must be
allowed the actor who is required to speak clearly through the necessary
obstruction. It is especially important in this play as those using the
masks are major characters.

>LLETT'S
rATE ®t NORTH UNIVERSITY

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GIFT WEAERAB ES - that are as
lonely as they are practical - and
jewelry for sweet frivolity's sake!
Just a small remembrance of a grand
gesture? You'll find just the gift
for "her" at the DILLON SHOP.

High
HANSEN

fashion
GLOVES

of capeskin at $3.95,
Hauflex rayon from $1.95

SLIPS
$1.95 to $3.95

BELTS
MITTENS
SCARFS
from $1.00
S-a,

"S
COSTUME
JEWELRY
from $1.00

BAGS
from $2.00
to $5.95
Ht
HOUSECOATS

Three Top Editors
Of 'Mademoiselle'
To Edit Gargoyle
For the first time in college maga-
zine history, Gargoyle is being edited
by its guests for December, the edi-
tors of the nationally-famous MADE-.
MOISELLE, which is the subject of
this year's "take off' issue.
Traditionally, Gargoyle yearly par-
odies a magazine of national reputa-
tion. but by way of innovation, for
this issue, three of the country's lead-
ing career women, all editors of
MADEMOISELLE, have contributed
material.
In respect to these articles Gar-
goyle has turned the tables on
MADEMOISELLE's August "college
issue," for which guest editors are
selected from colleges throughout the
country.
Betsy Talbot Blackwell, editor-in-
chief and one of the country's most
successful business women, has pre
pared the case of the editor and the
guest editor. Strictly for women will
be "Fashion Crumbs" from the type-
writer of Jean Condit, an associate
editor and nationally-known fashion
authority, and Geri Trotta MADEM-
OISELLE cppywriter, will give the
college woman a summary, from her
experience and knowledge gained
from contacts, of the hows of success.
But in spite of the fact that this
Gargoyle is designed along the lines
of a women's magazine and will be
nrmari concerned with matters1

1I >>,

I

*

MICH1GAN MUSIC ALBUM
Four Records by ElIetrical Transcription
MUSIC OF MICHIGAN
by VARSITY BAND and VARSITY GLEE CLUB
with GREETINGS by PRESIDENT RUTHVEN

Gold initial
CATALI N
BRACELET
at $2.00

Pin t Match $1.00

from $5.95
to $14.95

FIRST RECORD (2 sides)
Gretings by DocToR RUTHVEN
Coneiert Band in
"THE YElLOW AND BLUE"
Varsity Glee Club in
"LAUDES ATQUE CARMINA"
"WHEN NIGHT FALLS, DEAR"
"THE FRIARS' SONG"
SECOND RECORD .(2 sides)
Concert Band in
"THE VICTORS"
"VARSITY"

FOURTH RECORD (2 sides)
C oncuert Band in
"MIC-LIGAN FANTASY"

THIRD RECORD (2 sides)
Varsity Glee Club in
"MICHIGAN MEN"
"TIS OF MICHIGAN"
"I WANT TO GO BACK
TO MICHIGAN"
"GODDESS OF THE INLAND SEAS"
"IN COLLEGE DAYS"

Plue Many Other
Gift Items

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S
_
b Y I.- 1
! I _

4 Records for $3.00 ...Or Single Records at $1.00 Each
THIS ALBUM is composed of favorite Michigans songs by the Varsity Band and Varsity
Glee Club. It is an album to be treasured as a storehouse of Michigan memories. Nothing

II

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