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November 06, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

It"HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TIIURSDAY. NOVEMBER 6.

- I In

Ex-Daily Editor
MadeCorporal
Stan Swiiton Promoted;
Job Includes Radio Work
FORT CUSTER, Nov. 5.--Stan M.
Swinton, '40, former Daily city editor
and son of Prof. R. S. Swinton of the
College of Engineering, has been pro-
moted to the grade of Corporal.
Corporal Swinton, who is attached
to the Morale Office of the Fort Re-
cruit Reception Center, formerly held
the rating of Private, First Class. Hisf
duties at the Fort include writing
scripts and announcing on the Fort
radio programs over WKXO and,
WELL. and editing the Reception
Center weekly, "Salute!"
At the time of his induction in
February, Corporal Swinton was an
Associated Press writer in Detroit.
At the University, in addition to
serving on The Daily, he was on the
staff of the Gargoyle and was a memN'
ber of Michigamua, Sphinx, Sigma
Delta Chi, Toastmasters, Mimes and
Phi Gamma Delta.

Sophomores
To Meet, Plan
Black Friday
Games Feature Flag Rush
Tug-Of-War, Speed Ball;
lie-PantsingOutlawed
By HOMER SWANDER
Unlike the Black Fridays of recent
years, when sophomores were as
scarce around the Michigan campus
as the famous four-out-of-five, mem-
bers of the Class of 1944 are vigor-
ously preparing for what they claim
will be "a complete. overwhelming de-
feat of the lowly, freshmen" in the
coming class games.
In preparation for the games which
are to be staged in the Intramural
Building, Saturday, Nov. 29, leading
sophomores wil mleet today at 8:30
p.m. in Student Offices of the Union.
They will discuss the best ways and
means of "walloping" the Class of
'45, elect ,a captain and decide upon
the rules governing the various
events.
A similar meeting is to be held at
7:30 p.m. today, also in the Student
Offices, by dormitory presidents and
prominent fresmen who have nothing
but scorn for the sophomore "idiotic
rantings and ravings about victory."
No "sissy" affair, the games will,
nevertheless, dispense with the de-
pantsing and property destroying of
former years.
Games already decided upon in-
elude a gigantic tug-of-war, speed
ball with an eight-foot ball and a pil-
low fight. The main event will be a
flag rush with the sophomores de-
fending their flag against the attack-
ing freshmen.
The Class Day Games are being
held this year under sponsorship of
the Union, the Interfraternity Coun-
cil and The Daily, with the approval
of the University.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY_
SITUATIONS WANTED
SITUATION WANTED by couple as
porter and cook; first class refer-
ence. Cook can take full charge
and bake. Phone 4525. 106c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ingr Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Compay, phone
7112. 7c
LOST and FOUND
WOODPUSSYS-I'm almost dead
from exposure. I have pneumonia.
I plead with you on bended rickets.
Where the (censored) is my revers-
ible. Buck Dawson, 2-3101. 110c
FOR SALE
TUXEDO. size 37. Worn once. $17.
Call Ed, 2-4068. 109c
TYPING
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
90c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.,

Zany 'Jim Dandy' Set In Style
With Typical Saroyan Plot
By GLORIA NISIION must be constructed. There must be
"The set for -Jim Dandy' is typi- a revolving door, so this is added.
cally Saroyan in that there is abso- There must be a water cooler because
lutely no reason to it." scmeone takes a drink for no reason

" Wet Sock' Trophy Votes'
The C~t Beat: Dule InDailyOffice'Today
The City B__:_* *,
As the deadline approaches. 25
News Of Ann Arbor votes for the adoption of 'The 01'
Wet Sock" trophy have been received.
In~un m ryThe trophy is to be given annually
to the loser of the Michigan-Ohio
Sixtyv-five men from Ann Arbor State football game.
and other sections of Washtenaw The deadline for registering opin-
County will leave this evening for' ion either for or against the "Wet
Detroit to take their medical exam- Sock" tradition has been set as this
ilations for induction into the army.afternoon at 4 p-m. Votes must be re-
ceived in writing at the Michigan
Of the 65 men who 'will take the Daily. Publications Building, Ann Ar-
ride to the big city. 49 of those who bor. All votes should be addressed

I

3
_

These were the words of Robert at all. There is a window which re-
Mellencamp. Art Director of Play veals nothing and two flights of
Production, in describing the settings steps leading nowhere.
for the play being presented through It is no wonder that such instruc-
Saturday at the Lydia Mendelssohn tions have proven a problem to the
Theatre. stage designer. In fact, it is per-
"For this reason," he continued, fectly obvious that the playwright de-
although there is just a single set liberately intended the set to have no
for the entire play. just as much work reason. Perhaps this can account for
had to be put into it if not more than Saroyan's own words: "At the least.
that put into a play of several differ- we will confuse people."
ent settings. The main problem was Mellencamp describes the set as a
to get some unity into the set." stylized attempt. Realism is not the
purpose of it. He added, however,
"Jim Dandy," William Saroyan's that lighting effects play a very im-
ecmical fantasy which opened yes- portant part and therefore are ex-
terday in the Lydia Mendelssohn tremely elaborate in the production.

X
r
1
x
1
C

pass the exam will be inducted Nov.
24 and 25.
More than $12,000 was paid in yes-
terday by Community Fund cam-
paign workers to swell the less-than-
half total to 68 percent of the quota,
It is expected that additional re-
turns will swell the total further, but
an appeal was made to those who
have not been solicited to send their
contributions directly to campaign
h eadquarters.

to "The Old Wet Sock Eaftor."

c4E?2Ax

GOOD TRKK. . I

Theatre, will continue its four-day
run with a performance at 8:30 p.m.
today.
Just as Saroyanrs plays make no
attempt at clarity, his sets are merely
a conglomeration of units or groups
of units having no relationship what-
soever to each other.
Properties are stuck in with no rea-
son except that hie needs them. For
example, there is a librarian. She
must have a cash register, a counter
and a couch to recline on, so these

I
I

Graduate Outing Club
Plans Moonlit Hayride

I

A moonlit hayride through the1
country next Saturday evening is
planned by the Graduate Outing
Club. Graduate students of all col-
leges are invited to attend the hay-
ride which will start at 8 p.m. from
the Rackham Building.
Reservations should be made at
once-for the capacity of the wagon
is twenty persons. All graduates in-
terested should leave their names at
the information desk in the Rackham
Building.
The group may return to the club
rooms for refreshments afterwards
if it so desires. Further details con-
cerning the hayride will appear in the#
D.O.B.

Mood is built up in a great partt
through these .lighting effects. The
purpose of them is entirely psycho-
logical as they fade out and come
in with startling results. In certain
scenes. one person holds the lime-
light and therefore the spotlight plays
him up and neglects other characters
onstage.
In short, the setting is screwy, Wil-I
liam Saroyan does not want to "leave
audiences exactly where we find
them," and from all indications Mell-
encamp has helped him fulfill his
desire.
Minimumn Draftee Age
May Be Lowered To 18
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 5-VP-
Brig. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, National
Director of Selective Service said to-
day a shortage of manpower may
force the government either to lower
the minimum draft age from 21 to
18 or end deferments to older man.
An additional 1,700,000 men of
draft age will be registered for pos-
sible service next July 1, Hershey
stated. Unless the draft age is low-
ered, he declared, however, the ar-
my's manpower shortage will make it
necessary to cancel many deferments
to men 21 to 28 and re-examine men
previously rejected because of minor
physical disabilities.

r

Department of Speech
PLAY PRODUCTION
presents
'JnDandy'
by SARQYAN
TONIGHT at 8:30
Also Friday and Saturday
Mendelssohn Theatre
Phone 6300

ti

i-
make over your kitchen with
BETTER LIGHTING
A pin-to-wall lamp with a
100-watt bulb over your sink
-another over your range-
and a 100 or 150-watt bulb
in your center cciling fixture
will transforni your kitchen!
See the many attractive styles
of pin-to-wall lamps at your
dealer's today. (We do not
sell these lamps.) The Detroit
Edison Company.

Monday - Tuesday
Nov. 24 and 25
OSCAR SERLIN presents CLARENCE DAY'SzY
WJater Winc
111WITHRFATHER
Orchestra Made into a play by HOWARD LINDSAY and RUSSEL CROUSE
$2.75, $2.20, T'
$.65 PERCY WARAMwMARGALO GILMOIE
Balcony Directed by BRETAIGNE WINDUST
$1.10, $1.65 I L Setting and Costumes by STEWART CHANEY
Send Self-Addressed and Stamped Envelope
Be sure to specify date.

Students, Faced With Increase
In Campus Restaurant Prices

By DAN BEHRMAN
Increased costs and a dangerous
scarcity of labor have given local
restaurants the alternatives of rais-
ing prices or going out of business.
Proprietors catering to the campus
report boosts as high as twenty per
cent. Not only have gross revenues
been affected by the mark-up, but]
student customers are also hard-
pressed when they try to keep their
three squares down to the traditional
dollar a day.
There seems but little prospect for
an immediate decrease, and restau-
rant owners are crossing their fingers
against any added raises in whole-
sale prices. The army has also played
its part in gilding the blue-plate spec-
ial, since the government is forced to
buy huge quantities of meat for an
ever-growing group of selectees.
Al Heald, proprietor of one of the
larger State Street establishments,
told The Daily that he had made two
ten per cent raises, one after last
semester and another previous to the
University's opening this fall. Costs
have skyrocketed, Heald declared,
pointing out differences between to-
day's wholesale prices and those of
six months ago. Hamburger, once
17 cents per pound, is now 22 cents.
Paper goods, such as straws, are
nearly twice as expensive, and canned
foods have shown the greatest in-
crease of any item in his store. "We
won't have to change prices for a
while yet," Heald stated. "Besides
that, our policy has been to keep the

same rates Throughout a semester."
James Gribble also complained of
an increase in canned goods' prices.
Some canned foods have jumped as
much as 25 cents per dozen every
week, he pointed out. Gribble referred
to the Senate farm bloc as he cited
butter prices, up from 32 to 40 cents
per pound.
"We cannot raise prices propor-
tionately to these increases," Gribble
said, "Therefore we are working on
a smaller margin of profit than last
year." The worst psychological re-
sults. he pointed out, are in items
fixed by "custom." Many complaints
have been made in his shop about a
two-cent increase in milk prices.
Although a local grocer reported
only a five per cent increase in the
average woman's shopping list, res-
taurants are also confronted with a
labor problem. Student labor is hard-
er to obtain, and nearby defense fac-
toires have been hiring men away
from eating places.
The labor problem has hit John K.
Webber particularly hard. Webber,
pwner of a Washington Street res-
taurant, declared that "besides diffi-
ulty in getting help, we are forced
to pay them more to stay with us."
The student labor shortage has caus-
ed Webber to hire more full-time
workers, another added expense.
Pointing to one item as an example,
Webber declared that barbecued,
spareribs, once 13 cents per pound are
now 28 cents.

*

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S

/

Featuring the ARROW DART -
a good looking shirt for the well dressed man.
State Street on the Campus

SPECIAL ROOM RATES extended to faculty
and students.
The .College Depart men! is ever ready to
,ice you assistance.
iHE I BITMORE has won the unique distinction of
having the largest college patronage in New York
because of the thoughtful attention to college needs.

LAUNDERING

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

darned.
2c

INDIVIDUALIZED LAUNDRY
SERVICE

'I

Each bundle done separately,
by hand
No Markings
Silks, Wools, and Coeds' Laundry
Our Specialty
All our work is guaranteed
Free pick-ups and deliveries
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 E. HOOVER 5594

h.

WEEK DAYS at 2--4-7-9 P.M.

NOW PLAYING!

G

David B. Mulligan, President
Madison Avenue at 43rd Street, New York
Direct elevator and stairway connections with Grand Central.

They lived in the shadow of a first love!

HOL D THAT L INE!'"

Arrow shirts go the whole
day long without a "sub."
In the Arrow backfield is
Hitt, a fine white broad-
cloth, shirt that is all-
American in its long-
wearing and non-wilting
constitution. Cut to fit
your torso and Sanforized-
shrunk (fabric shrinkage
less than 1%). Get Hitt
+oday! $2.

_,-7
rI - -. :::
/ i
I

R

I

no

CLVELAND ORCHESTRA
ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor
SUNDAY A1'TERNOON, NOV.1 9
kk~z t:00 lwM
AUDITtEOyte'iM
' ~~Overture to "Esuryanthe" ....... Weber

E. a sLV~1 i " &aI

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