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September 23, 1941 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

iAiLr Err THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUES DAT, S

:PTEMtBF

3,000_Students
First Residence Hall Was Built
On Campus 100 Years Ago
Twelve Houses Will Be Opened This Fall; Mason Hall
Was First Dormitory To Be Constructed Here
With the r-opening of the 12 men and women's dormitories for student
occupancy this week, the University system of residence halls will mark its
one hundredth anniversary.
Mason Hall, built in 1841 for the use of men students, was constructed
at a cost of $16,000, a low figure when compared with the approximately
$1,000,000 that was expended on Stockwell Hall, newest dormitory on
campus. In 1850, two more residence halls were built, but they proved un-
successful and were closed. It was not until 1870, when women were first
admitted as students in the University, that the problem of housing became
important. Since that time, eight >-

Are

Housed

In

University

Dormitories

Stockwell Hall, Newest Women's Dorm

Art Cinema League Will Open.
1941 Series With Soviet Movie

With the promise of a fuller
r.ore entertaining season than+
before, the Art Cinema League
pn its 1941-42 series Oct. 11

and.
ever
will
and

i
t
S

dormitories for women and four for
men have been built.
Martha Cook Building, a privately
endowed residence hall, was com-
pleted and opened for occupancy by
117 upperclass women in 1916. Helen
Newberry and Betsy Barbour were
also opened at that time, each hous-
ig appriximately 80 girls.
Largest Women's Dorm
Mosher-Jordan, largest women's
dormitory in the country, was com-
pleted in 1934. It is composed of two
separate units, each having its own
dining and living roms. Jordan Hall,
named after former De9n of Women
Myra B. Jordan, houses only fresh-
men; while Mosher Hall, so-called in
honor of Fliza M. Mosher, also a for-
mer Dean of Women here, is used ex-'
clusively by upperolass women and
graduate students. Madelon Louisa
Stockwell Hall, opened in February
of 1940, is the ultimate in dormitory
architecture, accommodating 388 wo-
men in its two five-story wings.
Adelia Cheever House, run on the
cooperative system, and University
and Alumnae Houses for graduate
students' complete the University
dorm facilities for women.
Accommodates 950
Fourhdomitory systems, with a total
of 14 houses, make up the housing
facilities for male students. The West
Quadrangle, accommodating a total
of 950 residents, was built in the lat-
ter part of the last decade. Each of
its eight houses - Allen-Rumsey,
Wenley, Winchell, Lloyd, Chicago,
Williams, Michigan and Adams-has
its own house organization, including
a representative on the West Quad-
rangle Council.
Another residence group is the East
Quadrangle, a system of four houses
with facilities for 400 students. Al-
though there are a few graduate stu-
dents in.Hinsdale House, most of the
residents of the Quad are undergrad-
uates-over half 'of them freshmen.
This dorm (the other three houses
are Green, Prescott and Tyler) is a
Scholarships
Are Available
To Engineers
Fellowships, Loan Funds
Reward Ability, Need;
Requirements Listed
Virtue and hard work alike are
their own reward, but with a number
of scholarships available, the hard-
working engineering student need not
rely entirely on his own hard work
as an award.
Available to students who are
American citizens, partially or whol-
ly self-supporting, and who have
completed a minimum of 45 hours of
work at the University are the Simon
Mandlebaum Scholarships, estab-
lished in 1929 by the late Mary S.
father, Simon Mandlebaum.
One of the oldest of the scholar-
ship awards is the Cornelius Dono-
van Scholarship which was estab-
lished in 1922 as an award to meri-
torious senior engineering students
who are working their way through
college. Other requirements for
eligibility are citizenship, partial or
whole self-support, and a minimum
of 45 hours at the University.
Freshmen Receive Awards
Open to frehman and sophomore
students are the Robert Campbell
Gemmell Memorial Scholarships,
founded in 1926 by Mrs. Lillian Gem-
mell Boal in memory of her brother.
Eligibility requires citizenship, par-
tial or entire self-support, and a
minimum of 15 hours of credit at the
University.
Available to the same qualifications
is the Harriet Eveleen Hunt Scholar-
ship, established in 1937 by Ormond
E. Hunt as a memorial to his mother.
Aeronautics Recognized

Aeronautical engineers may take
advantage of a special scholarship
offer, the -Frank Sheehan Scholar-
ship in Aeronautics, founded in 1929
by Mildred Sheehan in memory of her
brother. The grant is available to
students intending to follow aero-
nautics and who have completed at
least two years of work at the Uni-
versity with a grade distinctly above
average.
The Joseph Boyer fund, estab-
lished in 1938 by a gift from Mrs.
Henry E Candler as a memorial to

popular residence hall for engineers
because of its convenient location
near the engineering school.
There are, however, a good number
of students from other schools in the
Quadrangle. Victor Vaughan House.
a dorm for medical students, and
Fletcher Hall, where students may
work for their room, are the two re-
maining resideice halls for men.
Prof. Litzenberg Supervises
Each of the 12 dormitories, with
the exception -of Martha Cook build-
ing, is under the supervision of Prof
Karl Litzenberg, Director of Resi-
dence Halls. University dieticians
plan the 9,000 meals prepared daili
under the general guidance of Miss
Kathleen Hamm.
Activities in the residence halls are
overwhelming because of the great
numbers and diverse types of occu-
pants. Within each dorm the house
government supervises the variou'r
functions through chairmen. Sports
camera clubs, musical groups, pub-
licity and social events are managed
this way.
The social calendar during the
school year begins with open houses
after football games this fall and
runs the gamut of teas, formals, fac-
ulty and exchange dinners, language
tables, musicales and current events
discussions.
Bull-sessions carry on yearly and
choice gossip makes the rounds ac-
cording to the best Michigan tradi-
tion.
Tlwo Buildings'.
Ho use Physics
Work Here
(Continued from Page 15)
fields, about a million volts potential
being involved.
One of the most precise of the
many instruments used by the de-
partment is the ruling machine,
which can rule up to 14,400" lines in
a space of one inch by means of a
precision screw and a ground dia-
mond ruling point. Glass plates ruled
in this way are used xtensively in
the study of the spectra.
Most recent addition to the Uni-
versity's scieptific equipment is the
electron microscope, six or eight
times more effective than the best
light microscope. Could the resolving
power of this new instrument be mul-
tiplied by a factor of about ten, it
would be possible to view the atom
itself!
Quiet, Please
In the realm of general physics
labs, the department is especially
proud of its sound lab, extending
through the first and second base-
ments of the Randall Laboratory and
built entirely separated from the.
walls of the building so as to be
completely sound-proof.
Other special laboratories are de-
voted to the study of X-rays, nuclear
research, spectroscopy, electricity,
light, mechanics, radioactivity and
vacuum tubes.,

Madelon Louisa Stockwell Hall, women's dormitory, was opened in
February, 1940, and houses 388 women in its two five-story wings. Cost
of construction approximates $1,000,000.
Scholarships Reward Ability,
Offer Assistance ToStudents

Students who show exceptional
,cholastic ability or who need finan-
3ial assistance to continue their
studies may find themselves eligible
for one of the numerous scholarships
and loan funds made available
through the University.
General memorial scholarships
established to aid students in all col-
leges of, the University include the
Horace H. Rackham Fund for Under-
graduate Students which is awarded
oreferably to Michigan students with
high qualifications, the Stephen,
Spaulding Scholarship for members
of the Beta Theta Pi, fraternity, the
Samuel J. Platt fund for aspiring
lawyers, the John Blake Scholarship
for students from Grand Rapids Jun-
ior College, Charles Francis Adams
Scholarships for Detroit Central
High School students and the Seth
Harrison Fund intended for descend-
ants' of Seth Harrison.
Otherfunds for use in any of the
colleges are the Levi L. Barbour
Scholarships for girls from Oriental
countries, the Collegiate Sorosis
Scholarship given each year to the
member of that sorority who gives
greatest promise of developing into
a fine type of womanhood,' and the
Alice B. Martin fund for residents
in the Adelia Cheever House.
Certain alumni groups throughout'
the country have also established
Funds to aid deserving students.
These include the Chicago Associa-
tion, the Memphis Club and thel
Michigan Alumni group within theI
state.
War veterans and their descend-
Art Association
Holds ExhibitsI

ants are provided for in the previ-
sions of the United States Army, the
D.A.R. and the La Verne Noyes Schol-
arships.
Concluding the list of general
scholarships are the Ethel A. McCor-
mick fund for women who show lead-
ership abilities in campus activities,
seven women's dormitory scholarships
and the Eugene G. Fassett Scholar-
ship.
In addition to the above there are
funds provided for stud'ents in sociol-
ogy, biology, library science and clas-
sical languages. There exist also
numerous special scholarships for
students in the professional schools.
Supplementing the list of scholar-
ships are approximately 150 loan
funds. The student who obtains
money from any of these is expected
to repay it as soon as he is able.
Enineer's Council
M'y Yet Ordain
'Pots' For Frosh
"Pots" for freshmen engineers isn't
a certainty as yet, but when the En-
gineering Council gets going again
this fall, it may well become one.
Discussion on the subject was cut
off at tlie close of the semester last
June, but the council was about to
recommend pot-wearing at that time,
believing that the upper-classmen
would be better able to assist the
freshmen in orientating themselves
to the engineering college should
tome means of identification be pro-
vided.
A universal practice some years
ago, pot-wearing in recent years has
been confined to fraternity pledges
nor the most part. Should the Engi-
,ne'::ing Council proceed with its plan,
pot-wearing may well return as a
general campus practice.
Activity in Sweden's shipyards is
being maintained at a relatively high
level, the Department of Commerce
reported.

.2 with a new Soviet musical com-
edy, "Vclga-Volga," it was announ-
led yesterday.
Completing the bill will be two
hort subjects, one showing the fam-
2d Red Army Ensemble in a series of
;ongs directed by Prof. A. Alexan-
Jrov. The second will be a British
tocumentary film dealing with the
sole of sea-craft in the historic evac-
uation of Dunkirk.
The program for the rest of the
season has not yet been fully com-
pleted, but a considerable number of
high-quality films is assured. Tickets
will be sold separately for each pres-
entation. Art Cinema officials said
that a series of films, such as Char-
lie Chaplin's, may again be shown
this year. Tickets for film in this"
series have to be bought in a block.
In olga-Volga," music is the
cause of hilarious rivalry between
two groups of amatuer musicians.
Each group seeks the honor of rep-
resenting their town in a nation-
wide music festival.
Ringleaders in this tuneful free-
for-all are Strelka, the village letter
carrier who espouses gay folk tunes,
and her fiance, Aliosha, whose enthu-
siasm for classical music is greater
than his playing ability.
When the two rival groups embark
on the Volga river, each determined
entor System
Aids Engineers
One of the most effective programs
in the College of Engineering is the
Mentor System, which will-begin im-
mediately after Orientation week.
Under this system each student re-
mains under the direct supervision of
his orientation adviser. Grades, is-
sued at the end of five- and ten-week
periods, will be secured from the
mentors, who keep close track of the
student's progress.
First year engineers should feel free
to call on their respective mentors at
any time with reference to any sub-
ject relating to their college life.
A new 24,000-mile teletype circuit
for weather reporting will soon be
placed in operation by the Weather
Bureau, Department of Commerce.
.

to reach the scene of the competition
before the other, amateur music gives
way to amateur seamanship as a
source of comedy.
Estranged by their musical dispute
and their hard-dought river race,
Strelka and Aliosha are finally rec-
onciled when the judges of the com-
petition award first prize to the girl
for her composition. "Song of the
Volga." The role of Strelka is taken
by Lubot Orlova, an outstanding So-
viet film actress.

SEEING

Services Are Offered
By Chinese Students Club
With a long record of invaluable
services to local Chinese students and
aid to its homeland, the University
of Michigan Chinese Students Club
will open its social, recreational and
educational facilities this year to all
incoming Chinese students.
In the past year the club sponsored
several social and recreational pro-
grams at the International Center
for its members. Biggest accomplish-
ment of the group during 1940-41 was
a spring tag day drive for the United
China Relief Drive. More than $1,000
was collected.,

Is Believing

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SPECIAL
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FOLLETT'S
State Street at North U.

Through the united efforts of
townspeople and faculty, the Ann
Arbor Art Association has exhibited
art in nearly all its forms, from sur-
realism to Currier and Ives.
With approximately one exhibitiion
every month in Alumni Memorial
Hall or the Rackham Galleries, the
Association is able to present repre-j
sentative works from various coun-
tries to both the University and the
city proper. Under the direction of
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser last year the
works of such men as Amadee Ozen-
fant and Ann Arbor's John James
Clarkson were shown.
Admission to the Association's ex-
hibitions is free to all students.

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by selecting a fashion ap-
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of Ann Arbor's finest
stocks.
CCVEYRTILLS
AND CAMEL HAIRS
$25.00 up

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Attractive prices and really
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COOLER MILDER BETTER TASTE
Chesterfield's mounting popularity is
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