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October 10, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Chinese Dance D
To Help Needy
Double Ten Day Banquet E
Will Be Given Today
The annual banquet celebrating of
"Double Ten Day," the 30th an- pa
niversary of the thin ese Republic, F
will be held by the University of on 1
Michigan Chinege Students Club at ease
6 p.m. today in the Methodist Church. regi
The banquet will precede the ball cOm
which is being held from 9:30 p.m. Hea
to 1 a.m. today in the ballroom of T
the League for the benefit of the Dep
United China Relief Drive. Many nur
prominent faculty members and stu- are,
dents will attend and' address the seco
banquet gathering.. Jeff
The Chinese Students Club pro- mor
vides social, recreational' and educa- fiel
tional programs for Chinese Students one
on they campus.

uties Of Public Health Nurses

Include Advice And Supervision
ly HOWARD FENSTEMAKER county health director and other
(Editor's Note: This is the second in members of the staff.
series ofsarticles describingthe work In addition to a well-rounded know-
the Washtenaw County Health De- ledge of the nursing profession, she
rtment,)must have training and experience in
amily and school health, advice the techniques of public health nurs-
the control of communicable dis- ing.
s and supervision of the work of She carries on a maternity service
stered nurses in the community in which she assists prospective moth-
prise the duties of the Public ers in securing medical examination
Ith Nurse, early in pregnancy and throughout
he Washtenaw County Health the prenatal period. She aids moth-
artment at present has only one ers in following instructions of phys-
se, Miss Pearl M. Haist. Efforts icians before, during and after the
now being made to secure a birth of their children, and helps to
nd nurse to replace Mrs. Martha promote adequate resources, for ma-
ers, who left the staff early this ternity care through community ed-
th to join her husband in Spring- ucation.
d, Mo., where he in director in Secures Medical Supervision
of the state laboratories. In the infant and preschool health
Contacts With Community program the public health nurse as-
itimate contact with the com- sists in securing medical supervision,
pity places the public health dental examination and correction of
se in a position to give valuable defects for every child as well as
stance and inforpation to the family education in the early estab-
lishment of sound health habits and
lersonal hygiene.
ieutenant Palmer Examination of school pupils and
interpretation of findings to parents
0 Give Naval Talk and children, promotion of a health-
ful school environment, and the de-
velopment of relationships to co-or-
ieut. Robie E. Palmer, USN, will dinate school nursing activities with
ver the second talk in a series of all other health forces are included
sday evening lectures on various in another phase of her duties.
ses of the pnavy, it was announced An important job is concerned with
y by tlhe department of Naval the control of acute communicable
nce and Tactics, disease. She teaches the family the
['he Organization of the Fleet and need of medical care, how to recog-
he Ship" will be Lieutenant Pal- ize early symptoms, precautionary
s topic for the lecture, to be measures in preventing the spread
I at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday in Room of infection, and the need for com-
West Engineering Building. plete reporting of such diseases.
he first talk of the series was Concerned With Tuberculosis
n Tuesday by Capt. Lyal A. Da- The public health nurse is also
on, USN, Commandant of the concerned with tuberculosis, syphilis
versity's NROTC unit. Captain and gonorrhea. In all cases she
idson spoke on "The First Line teaches the patient and family the
)efense." importance of personal hygiene, ar-
ranges for treatment and care, and
assists in rehabilitation of the patient
following cure.
New Opening In addition, the nurse observes un-
satisfactory conditions which may
exist in the source of water supply,
Catering Service milk supply, the lighting, ventilation
and screening in homes and schools.
N'hen you're hungry phone These conditions are reported to the
4761 for Free Delivery sanitarian, accompanied by a con-
at 40C up. sultation between the nurse and san-
itarian regarding cases requiring
fIamburg 14c . remedy.
Foot Long Hot Dogs 10c /
Fried Spring Chicken 40c E
3eef Tenderloin Sandwich 35c
kl kinds of sandwiches 15e up Speaks On Farm
LEO PING Recreational Areas
808 S. State St.
We also serve dinner Stressing that the best possible use
at our counter. for our marginal lands is as recre-
Moon lunch 35c Dinner 45c ational areas, bean Ernest B. An-
thony of Michigan State today high-
''- lighted the closing session of the
Matinee Today at Michigan Conservation institute with
2:00-4:00 P.M. his talk on "Finding Uses For The
A4ults 25c incl. tax Marginal Farm."
bean Anthony pointed to the Hu-
ron-Clinton Project and the Water-
loo Area as illustrations of 'this pol-
icy, and added that this use was pre-
ferable in most cases to the cultiva-
tion of the lands by city-bred farm-
ers.
During the morning session in the
Rackham building Mrs. Mrjorie
Bingham of Cranbrook reported on
the aims and objectives of the Mich-
igan Wildflower Association.
She was followed on the program
by Prof. Louis A. Wolfganger of
I Michigan State who spoke on "Plan-
ning Techniques as Tools of Con-
ALA ALEAddresses by Prof. E. Laurence
FRANK McHUGH Palmer of Cornell and Helen M.
Direed by Martin of the Michigan Deportment
-" Raoul Walsh of Conservation closed the morning
Extra meeting of the Institute.
"DONALD'S CAMERA" Afterwards, movies of New York
recreational systems and applica-
Walt Dsney Cartoon tions to the proposed Huron-Clinton

aE IKANE' Parkway were explained by H. B.
1 Earhart.

news of the dorms
By GLORIA NISHON and BOB MANTHO

WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH
YOUR LAUNDRY THIS YEAR?....

By GLORIA NISHON and
BOB MANTHO
Adelia Cheever has grabbed the
spotlight, as far as dorm happenings
for this week are concerned . . . An
invitation dinner for all freshmen
residents (and they are all women)
is on the docket for this evening.
Mystery surrounds the event, but
Sadee Sqwirt tells us the gals have
been asked to buy atomizers. A gen-
eral cut-up is the prediction.
Formal initiation of the freshmen
Sunday afternoon will stamp them
as "one of the Adelia Cheever girls."
Prof. Edwin C. Goddard of the
Law School and Miss Scliule, for-
mer housemother, will be guests.
The house choir-same quartet
which helped win the cup at Lan-
tern Night last spring-will sing a
few numbers. Violet Oulbegian, '43,
is chairman of the Singing Four.
Michigan House played host to the
other West Quad houses Tuesday.
"This Amazing America," a sound-
and-technicolor travel film, was
shown.
Congratulations to Byron Custer,
'43, president of Michigan House. It's
a secret, but he got married just re-
cently. We don't know who the lucky
girl is as yet. . . .
Helen Newberry House will throw a
tea dance after the Pitt game. Hot
cider, coffee and donuts will be avail-
able for the hungry. Chairman is
Pauline Bruno, *42. These dances
will be made a regular after-the-game
feature.
Not to be outdone, Alumnae
House will throw open its doors af-
ter the same game. Open house re-
freshments include cider and do-
huts.
Max Schiwank
DiesSuddenly
University Special Student
Stricken Wednesday
Dr. Max P. Schranck, special stu-
dent in the School of Public Health,
died late Wednesday of sudden com-
plications arising from a chronic ail-
ment.
Schranck, aged 39, was District
Health Officer of Twin Falls, Idaho.
He came to the University this fall
to do graduate work after receiving
his degree from the Iowa State Uni-
versity School of Medicine in 1931.
He was licensed to practice in
1933 and spent the last few years
at his post in Idaho before coming
here.
Schranck is survived by his wife
and two children.
IAnn ArborI

The House of Stockwell, coed
habitat, gave an informal dinner
last night. Deans Alice Lloyd,
Jeanette Perry and Byrl Bacher
attended....
Jordan held its first meeting of the
year Tuesday. Current events were
discussed. Ann McMillan, '43, was
chairman of the discussion. This will
be a weekly event in the future.
Mosherites went to tea Thursday
afternoon. Deans Alice Lloyd, Byrl
Bacher and Jeanette Perry and Miss
Ethel McCormick, League Director.
were guests.
Mosher officers elected last night
include Helen Whiting, social chair-
man; Annette Kemper, athletic
chairman; Geneva Warner, library
chairman; Jane Wright, and Doro-
thy Bogert, scholastic co-chair-
men; Dorothy Joseffy, charge d'art;
Jeanne Cordell, publicity chairman
and Leanore Grossman, music
chairman.,

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Courtesy of Darmouth "Jack o-Lantern"
A better method is to send it home regularly by RAIL-
WAY EXPRESS-and have it returned the same way.
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Our service is fast, sure-and convenient. Economical
rates include pick-up and delivery at no extra charge
within our regular vehicle limits in all cities and prin-

I

"After the Game
is over".
Stop in for
o box of fresh
Salted Nuts.
NUT RNIBBLE
339 South Main

cipal towns. Your choice of prepaid or collect charges.
Just as convenient too, for 'most any shipment:
Baggag , gifts, cake or a pet elephant.
AGENC.Y INC.
NATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICE C
Read And Use The Michigan Daily Classified Ads

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Prompt Delivery Service

DEER VAULT

Dial 8200
Straight Thru
Driveway

Here Is Today's

News

In Summary
With the confession of a Whit-
more Lake youth that he and three
others took part in several robberies
in and around Ann Arbor, police have
already. solved six theft uqses and
hope to get to the bottom of several
others shokly.
Classes in languages, business, arts
and crafts and recreation will soon
open for adults in Ann Arbor, under
the direction of the city's public
schoorextension service.
Courses will also be offered in
Americanization for aliens who wish
to secure citizenship.
Ann Arbor park superintendent Eli
A. Gallup was elected president of
the American Institute of Park Ex-
ecutives and affiliated organizations
at the annual convention of the exec-
utiv'es in New Orleans.
Gallup is a University of Michigan
graduate, holding an A.B. and a M.S.
from the forestry school. He has
been Ann Arbor's park superinten-
dent for 22 years.

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REtORDS
BY JACQUELINE MYERS KLINGER
1-
TSCHAIKOWSKY'S y,
PIANO CONCERTO IN B-FLAT MINOR
Brilliantly played by Vladimir Horowitz with Arturo Toscanini conducting
the NBC Symphony. The tempo is appreciably faster than the Rubinsteip
and Petri recordings. The only similarity to previous recordings is the like
treatment of chords by Horowitz and Petri. The conclusion of the first
movement was played eight times before a recording satisfactory to both
Horowitz and Toscanini was obtained.
BRAHM'S DOUBLE CONCERTO
A magnificent recording by Heifetz, Feuermann and the Philadelphia Or-
chestra. So difficult that its performance is a rarity, the Double Concerto
is now given a definite recording.
MAHLER'S SYMPHONY NO. 1
Those of our customers who already own the Mahler Ninth and Second
will want to hear this recording. More youthful than the Ninth, and with-
out the great choral movement in the Second, it is nevertheless profoundly
interesting. Mitropoulos and the Minneapolis Symphony.
SHOSTAK VICH SYMPHONY NO. 1
Although the First does riot have the stature of the Fifth, those who have
eard the older recording by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Stokowski
will be interested in hearing the treatment of Rodzinski and the Cleveland
Orchestra.
The Victor Special G.aif t0f fer s Obtainable Here

te
- -ores

WEEK DAYS

2-4-7-9 P.M.

w

- Today & Saturday -
DOROTHY LAMOUR
JON HALL
-PARAM'OUNT P~f SENiS/
is rremSeAs1
,"'TECNN/f'OtOR
Also
ARCH OF fIME
"Norway in Revolt"
Cartoon - News

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