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October 08, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-08

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THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

PAGE fMVE

. .

Independent Fortnight

To

e

rom

Nov.

I0 To

Banquet

_.
1_

I

ndependent

New Fall Hats Feature Clever Twist

Women To Be

New Hair-dos
Reflect Qirls'
Personalities

Oriental Ballets And CostumesFulford Engagement
Announced Locally

1o tBe -eatured At benefit Ball

I

n Programs

Chairman Rosebud Scott Is
Foretelling Various League
Howse And Dormitory Events
Independent Fortnight, sponsored
since 1906 by Senior Society, will be-
gin this year two weeks before As-
sembly Banquet, Nov. 10, and will
include special programs for each ofl
the five groups in the independent
organization, announced Rosebud
Scott, '42, chairman of Fortnight.
These five groups are the women's
dormitories, the Ann Arbor Inde,
pendents, the League Houses, Beta
Kappa Rho, m~ade up of wo-
men working and attending school!
and the cooperative mouses on cam-
pus. Committees of Senior Society
members have been appointed to
plan the programs for these groups
and all of the nembers will partici-
pate in them.
Programs Present Activities
The programs will present to the
individual groups the kinds of activi-
ties open to independent women onf
camnpus. They will also show to some
extent the averages of the different
houses and dormitories as to the
amount of their participation, and
the activities in which they took
part.
Five committees, made up of three
women each, have been delegated to
plan the events. The dormitory
committee consists of Peggy San-
ford, Jean Hubbard and Emilie Root;
the Beta Kappa Rho committee of
Mary Virginia Mitchell, Rosebud;
Scott and Donna Baisch; and the
League House group, of Betty Walk-
er, Elizabeth Luckham, and Pearl
Brown.

Know yourself! There's a scribe cc

-n our midst who claims that person-
ality always shows up (and we do
mean up) in the hair. It's not only
that you're definitely blonde, brun-
ette, or red-head, or definitely not
any definite head, but it's the way
you wear that crop of curls.
For instance, if you've had that
same long bob with a kick curl over
the forehead for the last 10 years youj
might as well know that you're noth-
ing but a dyed-in-the-wool conserva-
tive. Ninety per cent of all college
girls are in this category.
However, the brave souls who have
attained positions as campus style
leaders have set the pace for newf
coiffures.

fc
cv
pc
th
sc
m
m
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sp
to
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SBy MARGARET AVR
BYo MARh a RteTaeY o Chinese dollars to Chinese relief!
"You have just been awarded your The cost of an evening's entertain-
dlege expenses, room, and board ment, without sacrificing the enter-
r .two and a half months." tainment, will maintain a Chinese
Those words would sound sweet student two and a half months.
en to you. But suppose you were Michigan students have shown byl
enniless, unable to study without their response that they are not yet
is aid. Suppose, in fact, that the fully aware of the significance of
arce of your next meal were a this one united effort of Chinese stu-
ystery. dents on campus. Attempting to re-
"Who-who is giving me this?" you place the drive for the benefit of
ight exclaim, stunned. United China Relief with a benefit
"This is yours because a couple in ball, they require cooperation from
hanghai bought a ticket to a dance, the entire campus in order to reach
-a reasonable priced ticket to a their goal.
dendid formal ball." And here's what you'll be donating
Money Goes To Relief to the relief of your own "study mon-
There is another version to this otony", a situation less significant
ory that is not fantasy, but as- than the Chinese war emergency, but
unding fact. Every Michigan couple nevertheless earnestly considered by
eying a $2.00 ticket to the Double the committee in charge of Double

Ten benefit ball this Friday will be

If You're Freckled ccntributing the equivalent of 50
If your line is freckle-faced .pi- - - -- -..----------_
quancy, and you can face the con-'
servative Michigan campus, pigtails#League Committee
are just what you want for a hair-do. P Dac
Wear them with all sorts of ribbonsPa nsDance Lssons
and gee-gaws, little red poppies on For Tuesday Nights
the ends, or blue corn flowers to
match your eyes. One smart girl on Members of the Dance Class com-
campus wears beautiful long dark mittee will meet at 4:30 p.m. today in
braids with seven or eight daisies the Undergraduate Office of the
stuck very fetchingly on each one. League, Betty Johnson, '42, an-
If devil-may-care is your winning 1 nounced.
way, then you'll be able to wear one The Dance Committee is in charge
of those wonderful brush cuts. Just of beginning and intermediate danc-
a look in the mirror and let the ing classes which are held weekly

i1

_ .Y
3
a_

Ten Ball.
To Be Costumed
You will attend the first formal
dance of the season, and move among
dancing Chinese couples wearing au-
thentio costume, in an atmosphere
created by oriental decorations. You
may win a door prize, and you will
surely receive a program favor de-
signed with oriental characters.
Miss Lynne-Lee Shew, Chinese
fashion authority from Chicago will
arrange the fashion floor show to be
given during the intermission. Fash-
ions from the Ching dynasty to pres-
ent times will be included with models
from campus parading authentic cos-
tumes.
Scarf Dancer Featured
Rith Ann Koe, a scarf dancer from
Chicago, will offer interpretations of
the Chinese ballet, in elaborate cos-
tume.
That is a glimpse at the home re-
lief aspect. But the heart of it all, the
situation which is really dependent
upon campus cooperation to the ut-
most, is over in China where one
$2.00 ticket buys fifty Chinese dollars
worth of food and lodging.

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Fulford of
Ann Arbor announce the engagement
of their daughter, Virginia Elaine, '41,
to Floyd Duane Harrison, '42E.
Miss Fulford is now teaching in
Ovid, Michigan. Mr. HaIrison, son of
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Harrison of
Kalamazoo, is a member of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
Mrs. Ruth Rouse of Escanba an-
nounces the marriage of her daugh-
ter, Elizabeth Guntley. '43, to Ru-
dolph Potochnik, '40, on October 4.
The marriage was solemnized by
the Rev. H. L. Pickerill of Disciples
Guild at the Pickcrill residence on
Maynard Street.
New uinder-arm
Cream Deodorant
safely
Stops Perspiration
1L Does not rot dresses or meni';
shirts. Does not irritate skin.
2. No waiting to dry. Can be
used right after shaving.
3. Instantly stops perspiration
for 1 to i days. Removes odor
from perspiration.
4. A pure, white, greaseless,
stainless vaishing cream.
5. Arrid has been awarded the
Approval Seal of the Americat
Institute of Laundering for
being harmless to fabrics.
Arrid is the LARGEST SELLING
DEODORANT. Try a jar today!
,39 j At all stores selling toilet goods
a jar (also Ini 100 and 59t~ jars)

* * *

These typical fall hats, although
designed around classical lines,
each have a clever twist which
gives them distinction in a crowd.
The topmost hat has a new irregu-
larly shaped crown and its wearer
can truly be said to be topped by
flying colors with respect to the
pert bow and trailing ribbons.
Cut along "classic" lines, the hat
on the lower left has appeal be
cause of its unusual snap brim.
The bright cluster of feathers at

the back render it suitable and be-
coming with almost any outfit.
The more dressy hat on the right
has an "off the face" tilt" yet its
turned down brim gives it smar.-
ness. The wide velvet bow and
flowing veil add a touch of fem-
ininity.
Hats in general-and here's
proof-trend toward conservative-
ness this year, much to the delight
of our masculine friends, and yet
are subtly' smart without being ec-
centric.

wind do the combing is all the care
that's required. That's an A-number-
:ne ta~lking point for any style.
.i : Cuts In Vogue
-atcy cuts a, e similar to brush cuts
tut you have to have the sweet face
to ear all those curls. Bangs can
l. suited to almost any personality
-frizz them, wear them straight,
swirl them, brush them to one sidel
-suit them to whatever your mood.
After all, though, in this Ann Arbor
rain it really doesn't matter. The
best suggestion for this campus is
the "butch."

Co-ops To Haye Program
The program for the Ann Arbor
Independents will be handled by
Jean Krise, Doris Cuthbert and Rho-
da Leshine, while Dorothy Anderson,
JPeggy Polumbaum and Mildred Cur-
tis will plan for the cooperative
houses. The activities demonstrated
to the independent women will in-
clude publications, athletics, League
work and individual house activities.
The airn of the entire Independent
Fortnight is to interest the unaffili-
ated women on campus in the activi-
ties offered during their college life,
and to increase attendance at the
Assembly Banquet, which is the first
big event of the independent year
and which also concludes the Fort-,
night programs.
Senior Society Taps
Sometime during the banquet,
Senior Society will tap five new
members to add to its present ranks.
The members wear caps and gowns
during the ceremony and the follow-
ing day, new members will be seen
on campus wearing the traditional
white collar and blue ribbon.
Assembly and Senior Society plans
for the coming year were also an-
nounced by Miss Scott after a recent
meeting of the officers. The annual
Come Across Dance will be held the
week-end before Christmas vacation
and will be, as usual,. an informal
affair. The honor society members
will also be entertained by Dean
Alice Lloyd, Nov. 17.
Conference Is Planned'
Plans for a conference of inde-
pendent women from the Big Ten
universities, are also being made.
Problems of independent activities
and organizations will be the center
of discussion. There will be women
attending from' Purdue, Ohio State,
Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa, Chicago,
and also Wayne University and
Michigan State College. The tenta-
tive dates set for the conference are
either January or the early part of
March.
Qood Marks
Can Earn Qirls,
Good Money
In case some lucky woman has an
A entrenched in the B's on her blue
print, we have an idea. How would
you like to make that A earn some
money for you?
All's you have to do is take a fel-
low student, who seems to be having
a difficult time with your pet subject,
in hand and for 25 cents an hour see
that she doesn't flunk exams.
It makes you feel important (not
that you're not), provides a couple
extra cokes and in the scholastic vein,
it keeps the subject fresh in your
mind when it could so easily suc-
cumb in deference to one you're tak-
ing now. All of which sounls even
better now that. it's in black and
white.
Well, all interested-and you really
should be because any minute now

thrughout the year. The classes will
begin Oct. 14 and will continue each
Tuesday evening with the beginners
meeting at 7:30 p.m. and the inter-
mediates at 8:30 p.m. in the League
Ballroom.
Miss Ethel McCormick, social direc-
tor of the League, and Miss Barbara
Maclntyre, assistant social director,
will be the instructors and will teach
the fox-trot, waltz, conga and rhum-
ba according to the ability and pro-
gress of the group. Three dollars will
be charged for the series of eight
lessons.
Any girl interested in working on
this committee is urged to attend this
meeting, Miss Johnson said, and those
present must have their eligibility
cards. In case of inability to attend,
call Miss Johnson, 4441.
Appointment Made
Announcement has been made of
the appointment of Kay Jones, '43,
as assistant costume chairman of the
Theater Arts Committee.

..

Designers Find Inspiration For Fashion
In History, Newspapers And Vacations,
<.

SHORT HAND
A NECESSARY PART OF YOUR EDUCATION
- For fuller lecture notes.
" For part time and summer employment.
" For 'more certain employment after graduation.
" For congenial defense work in the army or industry.
Hamilton Busines ollege
27th year William at State

There's nothing new under the sun I
-at least not in so far as basic fash-
ion trends are concerned. In fact,
it seems to us that fashion designers,
the leading couturiers and milliners,
are practically the world's worst
plagarists.
The source of a designer's inspira-
tion is rarely his own brain. His ideas
are mostly adapted from the fashionsl
of other peroids or other countries,
with the addition of such definitely
modern touches as the zipper and the
use of synthetic fabrics.
Is History Student
How does the average designer go
about getting his ideas, then? First
of all, he is probably a keen student
of the history of costume; he knows
all about women, at least what they
have worn, from Elizabeth's farth-
ingale to Alexandra's bustle.
And when he is devoid of ideas just
like a night editor who is told to con-
tribute a feature, he simply pulls a
sleeve here and a neckline there out
of the pile of outmoded styles rele-
gated to moldy attic trunks or musty
museums, uses them in a new com-
bination suitable for the modern fe-
male, and there he has an original
(?) creation. -
Tires Of Frills
Tired of frills and furbelows, some
smart person becomes a big-wig in
,the kaleidoscopic world of fashion by
simply reverting to the classic, simple
lines of the Greeks, to convince sus-
ceptible women that they could be
statuesque Junos in softly draped
chiffon.
Or another couturier gets himself
and his creations plastered all over
the fashion magazines by appealing
to our romantic natures with hoop-
skirted, hand-spanned waisted, bil-
lowing formals in which to glide
around the dance floor with Victorian
dignity.
Capitalize On Calamity
Capitalizing on the war and other
news of interest, designers are con-
stantly introducing peasant touchesE
garnered from the authentic costume
of the particular tiny country that
suddenly is thrown in the limelight
by Hitler's latest conquest.
The Nazis took over Austria, so'
what happened? No more Salzburg
festivals, no more winter sports cen-
ted in the Tyrol after the Anschluss.
So we brought the Tyrol to us with
the help of Lanz and the ski experts,'
and we wore beflowered skirts and
embroidered blouses until the world's
attention became focused on some
other spot.}
Mrs. Simpson Inspires1

ican woman to they spent their va-
cations on South American cruises
-and returned home full of ideas
from Spanish mantillas of beguiling
black lace to Mexican huaraches for
the college girl to slop around in.
Chinese Suggest Housecats
Chinese houseboy coats of rich silk
and richer embroidery, Dutch girl
caps, broomstick skirts from the In-
dians of New Mexico, and harem
skirts from Turkey are all from the
pretty fertile grab-bag designers.like
to dip into.
Shades of a by-gone era are the
fashions of the forties: Bustles, bas-
ques and leg-o'-mutton sleeves from
our grandmothers, while we're bor-
rowing tunics, ostrich plumes and
peg-tops from our mothers. Then
there's the sheath-like silhouette of
the mad twenties, only now the un-
flattering line is alleviated by a beltI
to show where the waistline is.
Hide your hair under a cloche, the
best-loved hat of the women who in-
vaded formerly exclusively masucline

occupations in search of careens fol-
lowing the war and women's suffrage
-that's what stores and magazines
are telling us now.
Yea Npt rKnnx

I

.ou iever now
One never really knows what to ex-
pect when Hattie Carnegie, Sophie
Gimbel, Mainbocher, or some other
supposedly creative couturier exhibtis
a new collection. It all depends on
the headlines or on where the de-
signer went on his vacation-I-on what
fad, even going back to the Egypt of
Cleopatra, he decides to revive and
publicize!
French Group To Meet
Meeting to discuss "Present Con-
ditoins in Portugal" under the lead-
ership of Maurice Diamant, a native
of France, the French Round Table
will start at 8 p.m. Friday in Pro-
fessor Nelson's office in the Inter-
natioial Center. I

1 .

womm"m

.,
y.

IE
' S.-y ""§r " .td
MYi WEAKNESS

BL6SSCD.
Dear Budget:
Here's something new to
put us both ahead - Dar-
ling dresses to streng-
then any wardrobe.
$7.95 o$ .95
wools and crepes
velvet, faille insets
; #striped tiers
jerkin styles
Everything that's
tops right now!
y x

I ABE

Jf, '. ;
..v ,;
t...
"

$495
They played havoc with
my heart when I first
saw them. New room
for your toes... new
high fashion to add zest
to your wardrobe! Both'
in black or brown suede
-A --- IM

I 'NO &~

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