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October 01, 1940 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Honor Systern Permnits nigue Eng'inerg Dea, Crawford, Has Followed
Powers In Control Of Students Experiences in all phases of en- B.S. Degree in civil engmeering, Dean ford joined a combat regiment of
ginfring rom minin-t t +

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Unique in its function and ideal-
istic in purpose is the honor system
practiced in the Engineering College.
The general administrative plan of
4 the honor system now enters its 25th
year of successful operation: an en-
gineering tradition which was first
presented to the faculty by a group
of students in 1916.
Since its early beginnings, the
honor system has been administered
and promoted entirely by the stu-.
dents, and the history of the College
shows that the faculty has never
asked for alterations, nor has it in
any way attempted to control or re-
strain the student committee. The
system itself is based upon the prin-
ciple that it is dishonorable for any
man to receive credit for work which
is not the result of hia own efforts.
The administration of the honor
system is controlled by a committee
of nine students: two from each of
the classes and one advisory mem-
ber from- the Senior class. These
members are chosen by the students
themselves.
In operation, the honor system re-
quires each student to sign a state-
ment that he will uphold the prin-
ciples of the system, and on each
examination, he is required to sign
a pledge that he has neither given
nor received aid during the exam-
ination period.

The respect and trust of the fac-
ulty in the integrity of the students
is evidenced in the method of con-
ducting examinations in the En-
gineering College. The instructor,
though available at all times, leaves
the room during the course of the
examination, and students who so
desire may leave the room to smoke
or converse; the only limitation be-
ing that they may not discuss the
examination.
Infractions of the honor code are
reported to and investigated by the
student committee, and the accused
student is brought before the com-
mittee to stand trial. The decision
of the court, whiclhi may go as far
as expulsion, is then turned over to
the Faculty Discipline Committee in
the form of a recommendation.
Though the final action lies in the
hands of the faculty, no decision in
the history of the system has been
changed by the faculty committee.
"Perhaps the greatest good of the
Honor System," Dean Emeritus
Mortimer D. Cooley once said in out-
lining the essence of the system, "is
in the increased self-respect felt by
the student. He meets you in a dif-
ferent way-as man to man . . . He
is jealous of the prestige of his col-

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1
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administration, have marked the Crawford turned to railway engin-
career of the University's new Dean eering, working for the Oregon Short
of the College of Engineering, Dean Line, Denver and Rio Granae and
Ivan C. Crawford the Illinois Central railroads in the
Born in Leadville, Colo., in a varying capactities of rodman, mason-
Scotch-Canadian family, Dean Craw- ryinspector, draftsman and instru-
ford received his early education in ment man.
Nova Scotia, Canada and in Lead- Returning to the University of
ville. Before entering college, he Colorado in 1915, he held successive
gained his first experience in prac- posts there as assistant professor,
tical engineering in hard rock min- associate professor and professor of
ing in a Colorado metal mine. civil engineering.
Upon graduating from the Uni- A captain, and later a major of
versity of Colorado in 1912 with a engineers in the Army, Dean Craw-

engineers in France during the war
an dlater served with the section of
the American Committee to Negoti-
ate Peace. Since 1921, he has been
successively lieutenant colonel and
colonel of engineers in the reserve
corps.
Transferring to the University of
Idaho in 1923, he became professor
of civil engineering there, and later
was named dean of the engineering
college and director of the Engineer-
ing Experiment Station at that Uni-
versity.

Varied Career 1Un1 ~~ion Me,,, bersia
Are Being Issued Now
On leave of absence from 1933 to Michigan Union membership cards
1937 he served as state engineer and
inspection engineer for the Federal are being issued from 3-5 p.m. every
Emergency Administration of Pub- day at the Student Offices, Albert
lic Works in Idaho. Ludy. '42. announced yesterday.
Every applicant must show his
College Professor Arrested registration receipt before he will
receive the blue card that makes him
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 30.-UP)- eligible to use the facilities of the
Federal authorities disclosed today Union, Ludy stressed.
that Dr. Frederick Ernest Auhagen, Freshmen and transfer students
German citizen, former professor of may receive their Union membership
languages at Columbia University, pins when they register. Union life
was arrested Sunday as he prepared membership pins will not be avail-
to sail for Japan. ,able until May.

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lege, resents reflection and fights
if necessary."

"Double Barrel Rhythm
presented by

BEN POLLACK
and His ORCHESTRA
featuring "ARMIDE"

1.

The Place to Go.. .
Intramural Building, Satur-
day Night, Oetober 5th, Nine
until Twelve.

it

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THILs USTROUS WAVERLY BONDED FABRIC comes in new designs
featuring large and small patterns, as well as plain colors. Sketch-
ed is "Chantilly". Background colors include blue, ivory, rose,
green, gold, mauve.
Unlined Drapes (2 1/3 yds. long), 5.50 a pair.
DRAPFRY SHOP - Third Floor

2.

The Price to Pay

. . .

1

r

Decorative

1-00

Sturdily Constructed
Card Tables
Specially Priced
2.49

Roomy accessories for keeping drawers in apple-pie
order. Gaily covered in patterned chintz, they're deco-
rative, too.
CLOSET 'SHOP - Downstairs Store

Specially Made
for Student Rooms
Our Popular
U. of M. SHEETS
and CASES

for Leisure or
Study Hours
TI-I DOUBLE-BRACEDL) LES are your assurance of a table

Accessories

FIRMLY WOVEN to withstand
use and frequent laundering.
prisingly soft and smooth.

hard
Sur-

firm enough
too, with its

to be used as a typing table. Good-looking,
deep mahagony finish and washable leather-

ette top that comes in bone white, green or red.
GIFT SHOP - Balcony

54"
63"
72"
63"1
72"
81"
81"
42"
45"

x 99" Sheets
x 99" Sheets
x 99" Sheets
x 108" Sheets
x 108" Sheets
x 99" Sheets
x 108" Sheets
x 36" Cases
x 36" Cases

.85
.90
1.00
1.00
1.15
1.15
1.25
. .. .25.
.27

-t s

In the Gift Shop
Yon' find LAMPS
of All Types
LAMPS as decorative as they are
utilitarian. Pin-up wall lamps - -
1.00. Handsome styles with pottery
bases . . . 3.95 and 5.95. Floor
lamps equipped with indirect light-
ing, finished in pastel or ivory
enamel . . . 10.95.
GIFT SHOP- Balcony

Bring Order
to Closets and Drawers
If you're going to keep that well-groomed look, you'll want
special places for clothes and accessories not in use. It doesn't
take long either, when you have the accessories you'll find as-
sembled in our Closet Shop.
Chintz Garment Bags . . . 2.00 and 2.95; Transparent Garment
Bags . . 1.00 and 2.95; Chintz Shoe Bags . . . 1.00 and 1.25;
Chintz Laundry Bags . . . 75c; Chintz Hangers . . . 49c for 6;
Hat Boxes . . 1.95 each and 2.95 a set; Hose, Glove and Hand-
kerchief Boxes . . . 65c each; Chintz Shelving . . . 20c a yard;
Blanket Boxes . . . 1.95; Shoe Cabinets . . . 2.00 and 3.00.
Specially Priced Group
Hose, Glove, Handkerchief Boxes

r

set of three

$l.00 per couple.

DOMESTICS - Second Floor

'3.

The Band to Hear.

. .

!1

BEN POLLACK, "The un-
crowned King of Swing" and
His 16-Piece Band.
Tickets Available at ...
Wahr's Bookstore
Parrot Restaurant
Saffell & Bush
Ulrich's Bookstore
Miller Drug Store
Bluebird Hair Shoppe
Rall & Thrasher

SPECIAL SALE!
Radiant Bath Soap
9-CAKE CARTON
$1.00
BATHE in the glamorous luxury of a tubful of suds with-
out denting your budget! This is a long-lasting soap good
in hard or soft water. Delicately scented in apple blossom,
gardenia, carnation or pine.
TOILETRIES - First Floor

Imported Numdah Rugs

SPECIALLY
PRICED

4.95

Approximate 4 ft. by 6 ft. Size
A TIMELY ARRIVAL Of these rugs from British India. Colorfully
embroidered in traditional designs on white or camel backgrounds.
FLOOR COVERINGS - Third Floor

WOVEN SPREADS
A Boon to Dorm Loungers
$2.95 to $5.95
THEY'RE DESIGNS that appeal to
men as well as girls. Indian stripes,
modern plaid effects, sports and
nautical motifs, as well as repro-
ductions of Early American pat-
terns. A wide choice of colors.
BEDSPREADS - Second Floor

Upholstered
MAPLE CHAIRS
SPECIAL VALUE!
.95

.1 1

U I f

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