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October 01, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1940

THE MICUTC.'AN D A TT.V

PAGE TIREE SECTION 0

.HEu"",,.T.A_.. ,.T V. a "v 171 .1 .4 A A 1 .CV.11L 1 ..P 1. .I "" ",""""

PAC " "TIIREI '-- .. is lN f 1NK

wa

Dorms Present
Classical Music
Program Daily
West Quadrangle Will Give
Record Concerts Nightly
In L.A. Strauss Library
Concerts of recorded classical mus-
ic will be presented every night for
residents of the West Quadrangle
in the Louis A. Strauss Memorial
Library, according to Charles H.
Peake of the English department,
chief resident adviser of the West
Quadrangle.
The concerts will begin tonight with
Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue,"
Gershwin songs from "Porgy and
Bess" and Richard Strauss' "Don
Juan." The concerts will be pre-
sented from 6:45 to 7:30 p.m. Records
for these concerts are from the
Strauss Library, supplemented by
loans from individuals and organi-
zations.
These musical evenings will be held
as a result of the demand for more
programs of a classical nature. Mr.
Peake estimated that they would be
received enthusiastically by dormi-
tory students.
Tomorrow evening the program
will consist of Brahms' "Symphony
Number One" in addition to three
songs of Brahms' sung by Marian1
Anderson, contralto. Other compos-
ers to be heard this week include
Tschaikowsky, Bach, Beethoven, Cho-
pin and Debussy.
First evidence of the Qudarangle's
enthusiasm for symphony music, ac-
cording to Mr. Peake, was the popu-
larity of the four complete sets of
Music Appreciation Association's Re-
cordings, which the students may bor-
row from the library to play in their
own rooms.1'

_ - I

Enrollment Figures
Enrollment through the first day of classes, September 30, 1940,
compared with the 1939 enrollment of corresponding day

1940

1939

Gain or Loss

School or College Men Women TotalMen Women TotalNumber

L.,S., and A. ....2,663
Engineering .....2,052
Medicine .........411
Law .............594
Pharmacy...... ..62
Dentistry ........151
Architecture .... 200
Education ......88
Business Admn. . 192
Forestry-Conserva 139
Nursing ..........0
Music ...........132
Graduate .......1,166

1,990
6
37
13
14
25
138
238
6
0
238
142
308

4,653
2,058
448
60,7
76
176
338
326
198
139
238
274
1,474

2,731 1,891 4,622
2,125 7 2,132
419 33 452
597 15 612
67 12 79
162 27 189
192 136 328
111 250 361
198 9 207
154 0 154
0 223 223
127 122. 249
1,146 344 1,490
8,029 3,069 11,098
113 7 120,

31
-74
-4
-5
-3
-13
10
-35
-9
-15
15
25
-16

Pct.
.7
-3.5
-.9
-.8
-3.8
-6.9
3.0
-9.7
-4.3
-9.7
6.7
10.0
-1.1

Total .......7,850 3,155 11,005
Duplicates .. 89 8 97

NET TOTAL ... . 7,761 3,147 10,908) 7,916 3,062 10,978

-70

-.6

The final first semester enrollment for 1939-40 was 12,132, the largest
enrollment since the opening of the University.
Off campus enrollments for the Center for Graduate Study, the Insti-
tute of Public and Social Administration, and the Teachers' Colleges
have not yet been reported. They were not yet reported on the corre-
sponding day last year.
Latin-Americans To Tour U.S. Defenses

10,908 Enroll
Despite Threat
Of Conscription
(Continued from Page 1)
was opened for its first school year,
occupied by more than 400 fresh-
men and graduate students housed
in four dormitories.
In the School of Literature, Science
and the Arts, enrollment for the year
set a new record of 4,653 as compared
with the 1939 record of 4,622, while
all other Schools and Colleges of the
University except the Schools of
Nursing and Music reported minor
losses.
Although off-campus enrollment
for the Center for Graduate Study,
the Institute of Public and Social
Administration and the Teachers'
Colleges as well as late registrations
in the University have not yet been
reported, it is expected that the final
total enrollment will exceed 12,000.
Noticeable in the total enrollment
figures was the percentage increase
of women over men, 3,147 women as
against 3,062 for last year being re-
ported while the men showed losses
of nearly 150 students, this year's
enrollment being 7,761 as compared
with last year's enrollment of 7,916.
In the College of Engineering en-
rollment dropped off 74 students,
dropping from 2,132 for 1938 to 2,058
for the new year.
The most substantial increase in
enrollment thus far was reported
by the School of Music, a gain of 25
students or a percentage gain of 10
percent of the 1938 enrollment of
249 students.
The School of Education reported
a percentage loss of 10 percent or
35 students. The 1939-40 enrollment
is 326.
A complete report of the 1940-41
enrollment as compared with the
1939-40 is included in a box else-
where in this paper. All percentage
variations between the two years is
noted.

--_"'"
., " .. ,-

There m ust be a
reason...
why so man thrifty
students crowd into
Marshalls
"The little store with marny friends"1

F
i
i
i'
l

a
t

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.-(1)-
High military officers from Latin
America gathered here tonight to
Plans for the coming Intramural
Sports season will be discussed at
a meeting of the athletic man-
agers of all general fraternities
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2,
in Room 305 at the Union. Ath-
letic managers of the profession-
al fraternities will meet at 8:30.
Earl N. Riskey,
Asst. Director Intramural Sports.

start an aerial tour of this country's
defenses-a trip which General
George C. Marshall, United States
Chief of Staff, predicted would lead
to closer co-operation for "the se-
curity of the Western Hemisphere."
At the same time, Marshall said
the War and Navy departments had
begun work on plans for United
States bases at Bermuda and New-
foundland, where sites were donated
by Great Britain in exchange for
destroyers. It was also made known
that the joint Army-Navy board
which has been inspectirg these
sites, would leave tomorrow on the
cruiser St. Louis for an extensive
tour of the Caribbean area, where
additional sites are available.
On the flying tour of United States
defenses, the U.S. Army will play host1
to military men from the following
nations: Bolivia, Colombia, Costa
Rica, Dominion Republic, Guate-
mala, Honduras, Panama, Peru and
Uruguay. Representatives of 11 oth-
er Latin American republics have
been invited to start a similar tour
October 16.

i
,
1

"

OUR PLEDGE
serve you honestly a
teously giving you th
possible prices, ever
the year!
#taP~h---

e I
y d

We will
nd Cour-

lay in

Original
Ma Prhall's Daily Doubl
"Prices Effective Oct. 1st., 1940

25c Tube
PHILLIPS
TQOTH PASTE
9c
Limit, one tube!

U. ofM.
STATIONERY
SPECIAL
20 ENVELOPES
20 SHEETS'
9c
Limit, one set!

Erery Day Is Sale Day at Marshal's
"The Students Drug Mart"

Seniors!
NOW IS THE
TIME
TO, BUY YOUR.
Senior
Picture
$3.00
Purchase them
on Campus from
Ensian Salesmen
or at
the Photographers

.xis Planning
Way To Feed
SpainIn War
By KIRKE L. S1I7PSON
A more important question than
early Axis capture of Gibraltar with
Spanish help undoubtedly is being
discussed backstage in the current
Axis conferences. That is ways and
means of feeding a blockaded Spain!
if she joins up in the war.
The "Rock", British for more than
two centuries. still is a world symbol
of military impregnability. Develop-
ment of war-in-the-air and mechan-
ized warfare on the ground have af-
fected it less than any other key
fortification in the world.
Even such neutral military experts
as see possibilities of ultimate Axis-
Spanish victory at Gibraltar can see
no way of taking it by storm. Only
by siege, they believe, could it be
forced to capitulate, and it once
endured siege four years.
Assuming that the Berlin and
Rome conferences include specific
assurances to Spain by Nazi and
Fascist high military commanders
that "the Rock" can be captured in'
due time, the exact time table they
proposed would be of vital conse-
quence to General Franco.
Unquestionably, the first British
counter-move to Spanish interven-
tion in the war would be to slap the
full rigor of the sea blockade on
Spain.
Spain has not yet caught her
breath from the gruelling civil war.
Beneath the apparent calm follow-
ing the storm must seethe hatreds
born of the ruthless internal strug-
gle, and apt to flare into new dis-
orders if the starvation specter stalks
there as elsewhere in continental Eu-
rope this winter. It is a grave deci-
sion Axis diplomats are forcing on

Speech Clinic
Open To Treat
Student Faults
Facilities of the Speech Clinic of
the Institute for Human Adjustment
for diagnosis, advice, training and
treatment of speech defects are open
to all students who desire correction
of speech disorders upon application
at the clinic.
In addition to its research, pre-
ventive measures, and teacher-train-
ing, the Clinic makes examinations
of all entering freshmen and trans-
fers to determine the nature and in-
dication of various types of speech
defectives.
Stuttering, articular defects such
as lisping and sound substitution,
and aphasia, mental disorders af-
fecting the understanding and use of
speech are all treated at the clinic
by the 13 members of the trained
experts of the staff headed by Prof.
Harlan Bloomer. Students having
disabilities caused by muscular con-
trol and by deafness may also receive
necessary treatment.
Those students with foreign ac-
cents who wish to improve their
American speech may "apply at the
Clinic for individual instruction. Spe-
cial instruction is also given in
speech reading (lip reading) for
those who are hard of hearing.
Determination of speech defects is
based upon the examination given
all entering students. Those found
defective in the reading and conver-
sation tests will receive notification.
More complete diagnosis and cor-
rective classes and instruction are
then proposed.
Franco. It could lead to his undoing
ultimately.
Spain was bled white by her civil
war, economically as well as in man-
power. It is possible that Nazi troops
in Spanish rest billets, or concen-
trated over the border in German
occupied France, originally were sent
there to safeguard Franco's regime
from revolt rather than in prepara-
tion for the attack on Gibraltar now
being hatched.

reasons you
shPat NMarshaLsCt aeDu!'
shop 50 capsU
Popuir -Brood HABUT LI
" uyld p Your
X a gainst Cc
2pks 25CStart To

w1.25
Read What 2c will buy ALARM 'ere is what Ic buys
at MARSHALL'S Cat MARSHALL'S
CLOCKSaHA
1 Oc Glass Ash Trays. 2c ,0c Peb. Tooth Paste
Buy one at 39c--2 for
l0c Jergen~s Soaps . 2c 40c
150c Hinds Al.
10c Collop. Cups. 2c 15cHndsA. Cream
CCp Buy one at 39c--2 for
5c Teabury Gum . 2c 40c
10c Shot Glasses . 2c, ' Colgates Tooth Powder
200 Buy one at 40c--2for
5 Dble. Edge Blades . 2c Feathersoft 41c
10c Shoe Laces 2c CL EA S20c Col. Tooth Paste
- G .
1Oc SanitaryBelt .2c TISSUES Two tubes for 29c
25c Palmolive Cream
1Oc Aspirin 12's . . 2c Two tubes for 33c
10c Toilet Tissue . 2c 25c Col. Shave Cream
Two tubes for 33c
"Suppy of above 35c Prep Cream
Two tubes or jars 33c,
items Limited" N 10C Lux or Camay Soap
Bristol Two for 1ic
Doflar
Pocket Watch -- -
NAI'OUnbreakable 25c
NAIL-POLISH Crystal IC
REMOVERfBIC
H AIR-OI L
_ _ _ _ _ _9
Service!
You.bet 55c Lady
60c Mar-o-oil -__ Esther1 C
Shampoo 33c thCream
________ Postage Stomps Cra

les 0
resis#
:ods!~
>-doy l

OIL
,tangc

1

SAVE at...

THE SIGN OF

MARSHALL
CUT RATE
Phone 5933
WE DELIVERa
... at the head of Liberty
Street.

60c Kremnl
Hair Toni 3

at cost.
We will cash
your checks!

6Oc Italian
Balm 39

Lifebuoy
Shaving Cream,
2 tubes only

33c

SERVICE!
Store hours.:
7 A.M. to 1 A.M.

5 Genuine
Talkamine
Tooth-Brushes

39c

H E ..................

' III

I

C

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