100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1940 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1940

THE M I fit TC A N 11 A"TI V

Wk 11L.^qm r#wmww-*

C

AA Program Campus Noted
Will Improve\j As Midwest's
Facilities Here Drama Center

JJLj ~ix - 1txVrj I i AA"L AtiJ-SE~IVN-SECTION FOUR

Frosh Choose
Between Gym,
ROTC, Sports

Training Course Instituted'
By University Is Among
First Begun In Nation
The University of Michigan does
its share in the federal government's
program of training 20,000 men a
year in aviation.
Under the direction of the Civil
Aeronautics Authority, the national
program began two years ago. Mich-
igan was one of the first universities
named to institute the student train-
Lat year 50 University students
learned to fly under provisions of
the measure. Students receive 72
hours of ground school instructionY
and from 35 to 50 hours of flight1
training at local airports. Ground
school begins early in October and
continues throughout the first se-
mester. Flight training begins sever-
al weeks later and continues to the
following June.
Certificate Issued
This instructionprovides the stu-
dent with sufficient hours to preparer
him for a private pilot's certificateC
of competency.C
In selecting applicants, preference
is given to students having had atr
least one year's residence at ther
University and to students havingr
high scholastic standings. Studentsr
are selected on a quota basis fromr
all departments of the University.
Since its inception here in 1938,
the CAA program has expanded rap-
idly under the direction of Prof.r
Emerson W. Conlon of the aeronau-
tical engineering department. LastC
spring an advanced students' train-
ing program was initiated to enablef
students who had completed one
year's training to continue their in- s
struction. !i
Ground School Offered°
Students take the CAA course in i
addition to their regular schooling.
Ground school instruction is given
three nights a week in Room 1042t
East Engineering Building. c
Among recent additions to theF
t
training equipment has been a Link "
Trainer, one of those abbreviated
ships that go through all the motionsa
of flying without actually getting offt
the ground. This is used to teach
students the "feel" of airplane con- f
trols before actual flight training
starts.,i
Also at the University is an experi- f
mental station established by the
CAA to study airport construction. g
Purpose of the station, which is un- n
der the direction of W. M. Aldous, p
senior airport engineer of the CAA, a
will be to study airport construction B
throughout the United $tates in or- t
der to aid in the development of the a
Civil Aeronautics system.

All First-Year
Must Attend
Talks At Start

Studlents
Hygiene
Of Term

CA ~PL

CH URC HE S

WHITFORD KANE
Godfather of local drama
* * *

Three
duction,
and the

dramatic groups-Play Pro-
the Spring Dramatic Season
Summer Repertory Season-

have combined to make Ann Arbor
one of the foremost theatre centers
of the Midwest.
So important a subcenter of dra-
ma is Ann Arbor considered that in
recent years it has seen a world pre-
miere of a play, an American pre-
miere of a noted French play and a
nmmber of "try-outs" before present-
ation on Broadway.
Here is the record:
Last spring during the Spring Dra-
natic Season the world premiere of
'Boyd's Shop," an Irish comedy by
tt. John Ervine was presented here.
Genial Whitford Kane, friend of the
author, succeeded in having the play
first staged in thesLydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre and also took the lead-
ng role in it. This was also a "try-
out," since Mr. Kane intends to take
"Boyd's Shop" on to Broadway dur-
ng, the coming season.
In 1938 Philip Merivale brought to
the Lydia Mendelssohn the Ameri-
can premiere of "No War In Troy!"
French play by Jean Giraudoux, au-
hor of "Amphitryon 38." On this
'try-out" the opinions of Ann Arbor
audiences were so unfavorable that
he play never reached New York.
Ruth Chatterton, star of many
ilms and stage plays, presented
Shaw's "Pygmalion" here last year
n a trial of the play's possibilities
or a third trip to Broadway.
When "The World We Make" was
given here three of the stars who
made it famous on Broadway ap-
eared in the local production. In
addition, the play's author, Sidney
Kingsley, was in Ann Arbor during
he play's run. His wife, Madge Ev-
ans, starred.
Both the Spring Dramatic Season
and the Summer Repertory Season
ast professional artists in leading
oles, with student actors taking mi-
nor parts. The students' major ve-
hicle for experiences is provided by
Play Production, which annually
tages a series of plays and musical
omedies.
Health Workshop Attracts
53 Teachers In Summer
Fifty-three teachers from the area
f the Michigan Community Health
Project were enrolled last summer
in the workshop in Health Educa-
ion sponsored by the University and
;he W. K. Kellogg Foundation.
Organized and designed with a
iew toward promoting the teach-
rs' own health and the health needs
f children, the workshop was di-
ected by Miss Vivian Drenckhahn
nd Dr. W. K. Navin. Dr. Mable
ugen met with the group every week
rnd supervised the work of graduate+
tudents.

Freshmen: Unless you choose to
take ROTC work or to try out for
one of the athletic squads which
will be in action this fall, you will
be required to take a year of physical
education at Waterman Gymnasium.
You should make up your iind
before you register on the 26th or
27th of September. and then classify
for your choice as for any other
study.
Squads for which you may try out
include freshman football, track.
swimming, wrestling and boxing. If
you are interested in tennis you should
enroll in the regular gym class and
then enter the freshman tenni
cournament later this fall. From the
results of this tourney ten students
will be selected to train as the Fresh-
man tennis squad. The Freshman
golf squad will be selected in much
the same way.
All freshmen, whether or not they
choose ROTC, will attend a series of
hygiene lectures during the first three
weeks of school. These will take the
place of regular gym classes during
this period. Lecture groups meet at
the same hours as regular gym sec-
tion assignment, that is, at 3, 4 or 5
p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. A member of the Health
Service staff will be the lecturer. Al-
though attendance is voluntary, the
freshman is expected to pass a ques-
tionnaire given at the last lecture
and covering the topics discussed
during the series. The lectures will
be given in Room 25 of Angell Hall.
For students who take gym work,
the first semester will be divided into
three periods, during which the stu-
dent will specialize on three different
sports of his own choosing. He may
choose from six--boxing, wrestling,
gymnastics, fencing, basketball or
track and field--but must choose
either boxing or wrestling as one of
the three.
Freshmen Spared
Black Friday Blues
On 1940_Campus
(Continued from rage I)
that which once happened when
Sophomores and Freshman put on the
war paint during Black Friday of
each year. But that was long ago,
and today the tradition nas grown
up. Now Black Friday comes and
goes with little real celebration, and
the old-timers who have watched
the campus for generations merely
murmur, "thank heavens those kids
don't carry on like they used to."
No more do we have the fierce
fights -in the chilly waters of the
Huron river; or the grotesquely
shaved heads of young and old; or
the lavish expenditure of bright green
paint over bodies.
Black Friday has matured. Last
year the observance was awaited by
a well-organized group of about 200
Freshman, but when the crucial mo-
ment arrived the Sophomores could
not be found. They were living nor-
mal lives, attending dances, studying,
etc. So the cluster of Frosh shivered
in the breeze of evening, and fin-
ally went home to relax in hot
showers.
Still hanging on the walls in the
basement of the Union are documents
describing the challenges and ulti-
matums which the youngster classes
hurled at each other during the pre-
Black Friday hours. These posters
recall a vivid memory to the old-
timers. But to the 12,000 students
on the campus they represent an
old tradition that has died.

Services

of Worship

it

Open House ...Friday, September

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron

27

... Sunday, September

w

Friday, 8:00 p.m.
Roger Williams

29

Open House for students at the
Guild House, 503 East Huron.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House in Chapel Auditorium.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 10:00 and 11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass: 7 and 8 a.m.

Sunday
10:30 a.m. Morning Church Service.
6:15 p.m. Meeting of students at Guild House.

fk

HILLEL FOUNDATION
East University and Oakla'nd

Saturday, 8:30 p.m. Freshman Party at
Wolverine.

Michigan

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(DISCIPLES)
Tappan and Hill
Priday, 5:00 p.m. Picnic supper. Meet at the Guild
House, 438 Maynard, rain or 'shine.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:30 p.m. Disciples Guild at the Church. "Intro-
ducing the Guild to new students."

Sunday, Open House all day.
October 2-3, Rosh Hashanah Services in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.

._..__ i

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine and Division
Friday, 8:00 p.m.
Informral Open -louse at Harris Hall, Episcopal
Student Center, State and Huron.
Sunday

FIRST CONIREGATIONAL CHURCH
State a#.d William
Friday, 8:30 p.m. Informal party, games and dancing.
Sunday
10:45 a.rn. Morning Worship Service.
4:00-6:00 p.m. Reception and Tea.

,':

Libraries Hold
Over A Million
Volumes Here
More than a million valuable vol-
umes, representative of every period
and phase of the history of man-
kind, are located on the shelves of
the various units of the University
of Michigan Library.
The Library proper is composed of
several smaller branches, all of them
available to students and located on
the University campus. The General
Library, standing in the middle of
the campus diagonal, is the largest
containing 607,615 volumes, and
14,389 maps. It contains a number
of special collections, many of which
have been received as gifts during
recent years. Some of the most val-
uable of these are the Parsons Li-'
brary of Political Science, the Goethe
Library, the McMillian Shakespeare
Library and a number of other
groups of smaller size.
The large library building was
opengd in 1920. It has seats in its
various reading and study rooms for
about 1,000 persons. TherGeneral
Library is open daily, during the
academic year, from 7:45 a.m. to 10
p.m., except Sunday, when it is open
from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m.
The William L. Clements Library
of American History, completed in
1923, houses an invaluable collection1
of books, manuscripts and maps. The
library was the gift of William L.
Clements, '82, and relates to the dis-
covery of the western continent and
its settlement and later history. The
collection is said to be especially rich
in rare books and pamphlets dealing
with early colonial history and the
period of the American Revolution.
It is located on South University
Avenue.
Other branches of the University
of Michigan Library are the Archi-
tecture Library, the Chemistry and
Pharmacy Library, the School of
Dentistry Library, the Economics-
Mathematics Library, the Engineer-
ing Libraries, the Forestry Library,
the Law Library, the Medical Li-
braries, the Museum Library, the
Natural Science Library, the Physics

a
c
r
m
:
st
c
of
in
ti
th
vi
er
of
re
ar
Ri
ar
s

8:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m. Introducing the Episcopal
Center at Michigan, Harris Hall.

Student

,. 47,

ZION AND TRINITY
LUTHERAN CHURCKES
TRINITY CHURCH: East William and Fifth
ZION CHURCH: East Washington and Fifth
PARISH HALL: 309 East Washington
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House at the Parish Hall.
Sunday
10:30 a.m. Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Lutheran Churches.
5:30 p.m. Lutheran Student Association at Parish
Hall. Social Hour and Supper.
6:45 p.m. Association Meeting with Speaker.

ST. PAUL'S LUT$HERAN CIHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty at Third
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House at the Church.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
3:00 p.m. Service of Consecration, picnic supper.
Students will meet at the Church.

I.

CLASS of 1944
Come in and
Get Acquainted
with our chef.
a
THE FOOD he will serve you is the best at the most
reasonable price.
OUR TAP ROOM has a distinctive college atmosphere
-our dining room has excellent facilities for fine

a

vT:::
~/
,^!::"
[ \.:
4':'

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw near South University
Friday
6:00 p.m. Steak Roast at the Church.
8:00 p.m. Open House, entertainment and games.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:00 p.m. Guild Meeting and Supper at the Church.
Introducing the Guild to new students..

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State at Washington and Huron
Friday
6:15 p.m. Dinner in the Social Room.
8:00 p.m. Party.
Sunday
9:30 a.m. Student Class in Student Assembly Room.
10:40 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:00 p.m. Wesleyan Guild Meeting with Fellowship
Supper.

i

STUDENT EVANGELICAL CHAPEL
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Get Acquainted Hour in the Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall.
Sunday

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
409 South Division
Sunday
10:30 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
Tuesday
o.1C* r . + A "-,l r +n rl rtset yr+k ai/C-

RII I

i

III

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan