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February 01, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


r r Br tAtt i; 1941

,.
.,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FcP. Tn* flt

Varsity

Trackmen

Compete

In

Millrose

Games

Tonight

Canham, Relay Team
Represent Wolyerines
Schwarzkopf, Decker Enter Unattached;
Stiff CompetitionAnticipated By All
(Continued from Page 1)
the bar at 14 feet 11 7/8 inches and thus heads the star-studded cast.
Other top-notch artists in this event are Milton Padway, former Wis-
consin champion, who has done 14 feet 4 inches, and Pittsburgh's Dusty
Rhodes, whom Decker will face in dual meet competition next month.
With a recorded best mark of 13 feet 6 inches Decker is not expected
to put in a serious bid for top honors
tonight, but he should show well, ..
considering the all-around class of
his opposition.
For Schwarzkopf it will once again
be a problem of outlasting barrel-
chested Greg Rice and the former
Hoosier, Don Lash, in the feature
two-mile race. And since Ralph . "
failed on two previous occasions, in :
the Veteran of Foreign Wars meet '-"
and the Prout Games, to keep up
with their flying spikes, he will be
accorded little chance to do so to-
night.

Former Notre Dame Star
A former Notre Dame star, dimin-
utive Rice is running in near peak
form of his career and may be push-
ed under nine minutes tonight.
Schwarzkopf's best time is 9:04, es-
tablished when he 'ran Finland's
Taisto Maki into the cinders last
winter, but thus far in the still young
indoor season, Ralph has failed to
round into top condition.
Coach Doherty will also be able to
get a line on several standout mem-
bers of Indiana's team which is ex-
pected to press Michigan very hard
in the Conference meet, March -6
and 7.
Hoosier Roy Cochran is going to
defend his two-race winning streak
in the 600-yard feature event against
Jimmy Herbert, Wes Wallace and1

SPORT NOTES
London Youngster
Writes Matt Mann
For Training Rules
By WOODY BLOCK
SAY WHAT YOU MAY, sports fans,
"There'll Always Be An England."
"What's more, Matt Mann, Mich-
igan's swimming coach will let you
choose your weapon if you're in-
clined to disagree. He's convinced
more than ever that even if the
Mai Austrian Paper-Hanger con-
tinued his assault on the British
Isles till doomsday there'd be a wee,
little Cockney stick his shaggy head
out of a bomb-shelter, thrust out
his tongue and blurb, "Eh, yeh
missed me. Y' bloomin, idjit."
You see. Matt got a letter from his
homeland last week. He showed it
to this reporter and awaited the re-
action. Here is its content:
Dear Mr. Mann,
I am nearly sixteen years of age
and am a keen swimmer, hoping
one day to take it up as a career,
but as you have probably read from
my address I am living in London
and through the Air-Raids I am
unable to continue my swimming.
I wish to ask you if you could
send me some suggestions for ex-
ercises and any special routine that
you think fit so that I do not get
out of practice entirely.
Hoping you will oblige,
From
S. Wright.
THAT WAS IT. Just a short note
typewritten on plain paper. It had
come out of the heart of the war to
the heart of peace from a heart of
anguish. Matt's eyes watered as he
proudly looked at the letter for the
umpteenth time and said, "Y' can't
beat them, can you? What do you
think of that-a young kid with as
much courage as that."
Matt answered the war-worried
swimmer almost immediately. His
reply started off like this:
Dear Sam:
I was so pleased to get your let-
ter and to think that you are swim-
riing-minded during these days.
You must certainly have what it
takes. If you cannot swim, I would
do a lot of walking. If possible get
into a gymnasium where you could
use the pulleys to work shoulder
muscles .... Swim easy, walk a lot
and keep your chin up ...
Sam must now have his answer
from Matt. And providing the Paper-
Hanger's catapults of death don't
bother the inhabitants of London
more than four or five times a day
we're willing to wager a dime to a
donut that there's a certain Sam
Wright using the pulleys in a gym-
nasiumn( providing there's one left
standing) and walking his courageous
body till i's weary.'
Athletes are funny that way.
They all have idols whom they
would like to emulate and if such
a thing as a letter or a spoken word
is directed their way-brother, look
out! Not even a Paper-Hanger's
airplane would stop such an im-
portant thing as training via a
3,000 mile communication.
MATT FOUND himself the idol of a
swimming-struck Londoner and
he did the only thing an American
could do-lend his aid. It made the
Matt Mann ticker sorta skip a beat
to find out about a courageous ath-
lete-a lad who refused to take bombs
as a stop sign for a career of swim-
ming. It showed the spunk of an
athlete, the courage of a civilian and
above all-that "There'll Always Be
An England."

Brown Bomber
Kayos Burman
In Fifth Round
Baltimore Heavyweight
Is The Thirteenth Victim
Of Louis' Mighty Fists
(Continued from Page 1)
punches" and came charging in. He
cut Louis' right eye slightly in the
first round. In the third, he hit Joe
a larruping left to the face, that half
turned the champion around. A few
seconds later, Joe slipped to one knee
in Burman's corner, but was up im-
mediately.
Then, in the fifth, it happened.
Cautious up to then, Louis went to
work like a factory hand with the
boss watching. He belted Burman all
over the ring, bloodied his nose and
widened a gash on Red's left eye-
brow.
Righthand Body Punch
Finally, he maneuvered his man
along the ropes, near the Burman
corner, stoodn off and let go with as
vicious a righthandbody punch as
this Eighth Avenue sports arena has
ever seen. Red straightened out of
his crouch; a funny look spread over
his face. Then he toppled. He fell with
his head and neck across the bottom
strand of ropes and stayed that way,
moving only slightly, as referee Frank
Fullman completed his count.
Despite his weight edge Joe did not
appear to have the usual dynamite in
his right hand. Either that or Red
carries a special brand of cement in
his chin. For Burman took any num-
ber of solid smashes on the jaw and
didn't let them bother him.
Threw Punches Himself
At the same time he tossed some
punches at Joe himself that didn't
make the champion smile with glee.
One of these, a left-hook coming
out of a crouch, similar to the style
used by old Jack Dempsey, Red's
sponsor for several years, made Joe
blink in the first round. Another,
in the fourth, was followed by a right
that momentarily stung the bomber.
From here on Louis goes through
the busiest indoor season a heavy-l
weight champion ever has scheduled.
Already knockout winner in two out-j
ings this winter-he stopped Al Mc-
Coy in Boston last month-he takes
on Gus Dorazio in Philadelphia Feb-I
ruary 17.l
Final I-M Event Today
The final event on the Intramural1
Department's first semester sched-
ule will take place today when the
All-Campus Twenty-one Tournamentr
finals are played. Rowland Mc-
Laughlin and Max Kanter will meet
for the title at 3:30 p.m. at the1
Sports Building._

Eddie Lowi
'4
By BOB STAHL
Robert Louis Stevenson probably
never heard of Mr. J. Edward Lowrey
when he wrote his "Dr. Jekyll and
Mr. Hyde", but he very well might
have had Michigan's genial hockey
coach in mind. For Eddie Lowrey
does possess two extremely different
personalities.
Off the ice he appears to be a
sedate, well-dressed gentleman-per-
haps an English instructor in the
University. But give him a pair of
skates, put him on the Coliseum ice
and then notice the change.
Fiery Coach
For in his official capacity of coach
of the Wolverine puckmen, Eddie
takes on all the fervor and fire which

rey

tice just as though he were a team-
mate and not their mentor.
Eddie came to Michigan in 1927
and has turned out many winning
aggregations over a period of four-
teen years. He played professional
hockey from 1911 until 1921, holding
down the position of right wing on
the Ottawa Senators. He also played
a year on the old Toronto Ontarios.
Interesting Anecdotes
Eddie relates many interesting
anecdotes about his years in the pro
ranks. He likes to tell how, in the
closing minutes of a game, the man-
ager of .the team that was ahead
would throw a fresh puck on the ice.
Because it takes a whilefor a warm
puck to become acclimated to the
temperature of the ice, thus making
the disk hard to manipulate, this
slows up the game much the same as
freezing the ball' in basketball does.
Incidentally, this is the reason, why
Eddie becomes angry whenever a
member of the audience refuses to
throw the puck back onto the ice'
after it has been hit up into the
crowd.
As for hockey at Michigan, Eddie
is very optimistic. A promising crop
of freshmen and the return to ac-
tion of several men who were ineligi-
I .________

ble this season provide him with
high hopes for the future. Of course,
it is too early to make predictions
for next year, but according to Eddie.
there is every chance that the Wol-
verine puckmen will once more re-
turn to their former position at the
top of the hockey ranks.

11

'""""

SINGING, SPEECH,
RADIO VOICES
are
quickly, simply, surely
developed
by
VOICE SCIENTIST
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN
B.M., A.B., M.A., SC.D.
Private Studio:
Wagner Building, 303 S. State
For Appointment. Dial 6584

. . . Douhle Personality

RALPH SCHWARZKOPF

Johnny Quigley, while Indiana's ace
middle-distance man, Campbell
Kane, will also swing into action.

Sofiak Retains Lead In Scoring
o'

II

In thirteen games thus far played
Mike Sofiak remains the Varsity's
leading point maker. His 124 tallies
are good enough to top second-place
Jim Mandler by 12 points.
Sofiak is leading in another de-
partment, personal fouls, with 34
infractions.
The little man, however, was forced

VARSITY SCORING RECORDS

Sof iak
Mandler
Brogan
Ruehle
Cartmil.
Fitzgerald
Herrmann
Comm
Grissen
Doyle
Glasser
Totals

G FG FT TP APG
13 43 38 124 9.5
13 47 18 112 8.6
13 27 15 69 5.3
13 22 13 57 4.4
12 11 5 27 2.3
4 9 2 20 5.0
11 5 8 18 1.6
5 4 9 17 3.4
8 2 9 13 1.6
7 6 0 12 1.7
6 2 1 5 .8
13 178 118 474 36.5

EDDIE LOWREY
has characterized him in the 14 years
he has been here. Shouting across
the ice to one of his players or jump-
ing between two men fighting for
the puck, Lowrey himself provides
the sparkplug which he is always
looking for to inspire his team.
Spirit of Camaraderie
The one thing that impresses an
observer of the hockey team at prac-
tice more than anything else is the
friendship that exists between Eddie
and the members of the squad. Be-
sides the high respect the boys have
for him as their coach, he is one of
them and takes part in their horse-
play in the locker-room after prac-

to relinquish his foul shooting
to sophomore Mel Comin, who
boasts an .819 average.
The complete records follow:

title
now

..t t«

FOUL SHOOTING AVERAGES

U

_.._.rr_ --1.

Comin
Sofiak
Ruehle
Herrmann
Grissen
Glasser
Brogan
Mandler
Fitzgerald
Westerman
Doyle

FA
11
51
19
12
16
2
31
3 9
10
2
0

FM
9
38
13
8
9
1
15
18
2
0
0

AVE.
.819
.745
.684
.667
.563
.540
.483
.461
.200
.000
.040

PF
4
34
26
9
7
1
22
22
7
0
3

hes prevent accidents!
This handy little light plugs into
any electric outlet and costs about
one cent a week to operate. Leave
it on all night. For helpful light-
ing suggestions, call any Detroit
Edison office.

SPORTS BUILDING NOTICE
The Sports Building will be
open 'daily from 8:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. from Saturday, February 1,
to Monday, February 17, inclusive.
Activities will stop at 6:00 p.m.
The swimming pool will be open
from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m. daily.
The large gymnasium will be
closed from Sunday, February 9,
to Monday, February 17, inclu-
sive, for decorating and cleaning.
The building will be closed for all
activities after 12:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, February 14, and all day
Saturday, February 15. It will be
possible for visitors to inspect the
J-Hop decorations up until 6:30
p.m. Friday, February 14. -
Intramural Sports Department

I

Totals 193 113 .585 135
VIOLIN INSTRUCTION
Marion Struble Freeman
Semnester Opening Feb. 17th
Bcgnnhna and Advanced Pupils
Coaching DIAL 2-1208

Read The Daily Classifieds!I

0

MONEY

or TRADE

EVERY
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
enin
Thru Exams -
Between Semesters.
CAB4RET STYLE

for your

I

Bring them in now and get a Credit Slip
A Square Deal Always
at.

1 11

f

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