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January 30, 1940 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-30

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 1941

T"iaE MICh IGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN'

President Ruthven s Annual Reportl
Describes University Developments
Editor's Note: This is the second in and the increasing interest of the bibliography. The collection is com-
a series of articles which The Daily itrckefealler Foundation and the prised chiefly of monographs.
Is publishing, presenting newsworthy Pan-American Sanitary Bureau ine
items from President Alexander G.f34AmerSitryra uFsn
Ruthven's annual report of 1939-40 to thbe University's program of pub- Fewer students are enrolling inI

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

the Board of Regents. This document
contains comprehensive reports from
all the major administrative officers
in the University.
With 212 persons majoring in eco-
nomics, the economics department is
rated the most popular field of con-
centration in the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts, according
to the report of Registrar Ira M.
Smith. Second most popular de-
partment of concentration in history
with 201 enrollees. One hundred
forty-four persons are concentrating
in English, and the zoology depart-
ment claims 141 majors. The de-
partments of Greek, landscapear-
chitecture and religion and ethics
each have only one concentrator.
Librarian William W. Bishop re-
ported that a "decided improve-
ment has been made in the light-
ing of the Graduate Reading
Room, the first floor Study Hall,
the Medical Reading Room and
the Delivery Corridor" financed
by funds from the general main-
tenancefunds, but that "this new
lighting is not wholly satisfactory".
Librarian Bishop stated that the
library could not meet "a con-
sistent demand for longer hours
of opening in the departmental
and collegiate libraries" unless its
present budget was materially in-
creased.

li nealth.
The Christian Jensen collection of
Panish history and literature was
described by Librarian Bishop as "the
'nost important purchase of the year"
for the University Library. Num-
bering about 1,500 items, the collec-
tion gives the University for the first
time a "respectable" collection in the
important field of Danish literature.
covering most of the Danish authors
of the past two centuries and con-
Saining many works on history and

the combined curricula, according to
Dean Kraus of the literary school.
He believes that combined curicula
in law, medicine and business ad-I
ministration have almost outlived
their usefulness. "This tendency has
been corroborated by the experience
of the academic counselors, which
indicates that fewer students con-
templating these three professions
wish to enter the professional school
without having obtained the bache-
lor's degree."

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 1 to February 12, 1941
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time of
Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
,having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the first quiz
period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued though the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflict between assigned examina-
tion periods should be reported for adjustment ;to Professor D. W.
McCready, Room 3209 East Engineering Building, before January 29.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive
notification from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period February 1 to February 12.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of examination.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of the
Classification Committee.

(Continued from Page 5)
Technologist (any specialized
branch), salary $3,800, Dec. 31, 1941.
Associate Technologist (any spe-
cialized branch), salary $3,200, Dec.
31, 1941.
Assistant Technologist (any spe-
cialized branch), salary$2,600, Dec.
31, 1941.
MILWAUKEE CIVIL SERVICE
Instructor in Public Health Nursing
(no resident requirement) $2,100-
$2,280, Feb. 17, 1941.
NEW YORK CIVIL SERVICE
Last date for filing application,
Feb. 7, 1941).
A bulletin containing a number of
New York Civil Service Examinations
is on file at the Bureau. Among these
a re the following examinations: As-,
lstant Superintendent, Blindness
revention Consultant'Nurse, Farm
Products Promotion Agent, Farm
r(-ducts Promotion Assistant, Farm
', roucts Promotion Supervisor, High-
sy General Maintenance Foreman,
x: dustrial Homework Investigator,0
Instructor (Agriculture), Instructor
(Physical and Recreational Director),
Junior Aquatic Biologist, Junior Edu-
cation Examiner, Junior Psychologist,
fMilk Promotion Agent, Milk Promo-,
tion Assistant, Milk Promotion Sup-
-rvisor, Physiotherapist, Psychiatric
Museum Curator, Railroad Equip-
ment Inspector, Senior Aquatic Bi-
1logist, Senior Engineering Aid. Sen-
ior Inspector of Standards and Pur-
chase, Senior Medical Biochemist,
Social Worker, Case Supervisor,
settlement Accounts Clerk, Stenog-
rapher, Account Clerk, X-Ray Techni-
cian, Assistant Photo Recording
Clerk, Guard-Farmer, Head Janitor,
and Senior Court Clerk.
Complete information on file at
the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall. Office1
hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
Academic Notices'
Classification for Aeronautical En-
gineering Students: Classification
numbers for the second semester will
be distributed by lot to all students
in the Department. Students will!
meet in Room B-308 East Engineering
Building, on Friday, February 14, ac-
cording to the following schedules:
Iphomores, 8:00 a.m.; Juniors, 8:30
.; Seniors, 9:00 a.m.; students
o entered last fall with advanced1
edi and all new advanced credit;
1 _ucients, 9:30 a.m. The doors will be'

closed promptly at the times indi-
cated, and students who fail to re-
ceive a number at these appointed
times will be compelled to select one

.
i

has been made.

231 A H.: Sinnema, Willey, Ed-
Nar(1s. Broadbent.
35 A.H.: Pott, Ebelke, Winkelman.
German2.
101 Ec : All sections.
German 31.
B H.H. Pott, Edwards, Diamond.
2003 A.H. Gaiss, Broadent, Ebelke.
301 U.H. Wahr.
203 U.H. Nordmeyer.
201 U.H. Reichart.
306 U.H. Eaton.
German 32.
D H.H. All sections.
Doctoral Examination for Mr. Her-
bert Weisinger, English Language,
and Literature; Thesis: "The Idea
of the Renaissance from Petrarch

English I - Final Examina
Tuesday, February 4. 2-5 p.M.
Arthos-16 A.H.
Baum-229 A.H.
Bertram-305 S .W.
Boys-205 M.H.
Calver-231 A.H.
Engei-1018 A.H.
E(stt--3231 A.H.
FIctcher----W. Phys. Lee.
Garvin-2054 N.S.
Green---W. Phys. Lee.
Greenhut-6 A.H.
Haines-4203 A.H.
Hialliday-205 M.H.
Haugh-3011 A.H.
Helm-2014 A.H.
Martin-22-3 A.H.
McClennen-W. Phys. Lee.
McCormick-2016 A.H.
Ogden-202 W. Phys.
O'Neill-103 R.L.
Peake--103 R.L.
e Rettger-305 S.W.
Robertson-201 U.H.
Schroeder-102 Ec.
Schueller-18 A.H.
Taylor-35 A.H.
Walker-2234 A.H.
Weimer-231 A.H.
Weisinger-2029 A.H.
Wells--W. Phys. Lee.
White-203 U.H.
Woodbridge-2235 A.H.

rations:
a.

P

a

to Hallam." today a 2:00 p.m., in
SRoom a223 Angell Hall. Chairman,
1 W. G. Rzice.
Geoige Keck, Phiysic;: Thlesis: "Depth
Dependence of Earthi Coniductivity as
Dteumined by Surface Potentials,"
today at 3:00 p.m., in the East Coun-
cil Room, Rackham Building. Chair-
man, W. F. Colby.
Doctoral Examination for Mr. John
Clark Sheehan, Chemistry: Thesis:
"The Synthesis of Plant-Growth Sub-
stances and Carinogenic Hydrocar-
bons," today at 3:00 p~m., in 309
Chemistry.Chairman, W. E. Bach-
mann.
By action of the Executive Board
(Continued on Page 8)

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Dean Edward H., Kraus of the lit-
erary school asserted in his annual
report that it was almost impossible
to overestimate the need for scholar-
ships. Citing case histories of stu-
dents who were carrying heavy bur-
dens of outside work and still main-
taining records of high scholarship,
Dean Kraus declared that "it is no
advantage to graduate brilliant stu-
dents who must proceed to Arizona
immediately after graduation be-
cause of tuberculosis". He pointed
out that "even though a rugged
constitution can withstand the
strain of four years of self-support
and study, it is still economically
wasteful to have exceptional or bril-
liant students substituting dish-
washing for hours in the library or
laboratory. To no small extent the
future of much in America is de-
pendent on the superior students in
the colleges of the country. Ability
and superiority are found just as
often anong the poor as among the
more fortunate rich. A large in-
crease in scholarship funds would
make possible a substantial invest-
ment in superior students in our
College. It is well to remember that
investment in human futures is not
subject to depressions or stock man-
ipulation.
Dean Kraus said that several aca-
demic counselors have made "vigor-
ous atteniipts" to find funds outside
the University for assisting fresh-
men and sophomores, and had suc-
ceeded in persuading a few commu-
nity service clubs to finance students
in their own towns. The efforts of
the counselors have resulted in a
thousand dollar increase in the
scholarship funds of the literary col-
lege.
Optimistic were the conclusions
registered by J. Raleigh Nelson,
eeanelor and director of foreign
students, in surveying the activi-
ties at the International Center
during 1939-40. A spirit of good
will among the foreign students
was somehow achieved, he noted,
despite the animosities which
might have naturally arisen from
the war situation, and he observed
that they were regarded as an
"important. and integral element
in our university life", not as
aliens and strangers.
Counselor Nelson reported a
large increase of students from
Latin America, stating . that this
was due to the establishment of
exchange scholarships with Brazil

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

MONDAY
TUESDAY

1
1

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, Feb. 10
Friday, Feb. 7
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Monday, Feb. 3
Monday, Feb. 3
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Tuesday, Feb. 11

Monday, Feb. 10
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Wednesday, Feb. 12
Friday, Feb. 7
Thursday, Feb. 6
*Saturday, Feb. 8
Saturday, Feb. 1
*Thursday, Feb. 6
*Saturday, Feb. 8
*Thursday, Feb. 6
*Friday, Feb. 7
*Tuesday, Feb. 11

8-12
8-12
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12

History 173, Final Examination on
Tuesday, February 4, 9-12. Sections
3 and 4 will meet in 2009 A.H.; all
others in Room C, Haven.
History 49, Final Examination on
Tuesday, February 4, 9-12 a.m.
Abrams to Hofman, 101 Economics
Building.
Holmes to Zarnow, Room B, Haven
Hall.
The final examination for Psychol-
ogy 55 will take place in Room 231
Angell Hall on Monday, Feb. 10, 2-5
p.m.
Room Assignments, German 1, 2,
31, 32: Saturday, February 8, 9-12
a.m.e
German 1.

Su

Our Month-End Values Continue!
Dresses - Coats - Suits
Blouses - Skirts
and many other items
marked down regardless of former price for
Immediate Disposal
BECAUSE-It is our policy to close out all our
merchandise every season.
BECAUSE-Early Spring fashions are claim-
ing our floor space and attention.
Dresses ... $2,98, $5, $10, $15 Coats . $7.95, $10, $15
its . . . $5, $7 Blouses, Gloves, Jewelry . . . 50c
.Jhe C.otza tlL ┬žbt~n

SHOP

E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 2; German; Spanish
Surv. 1, 2 ,4; French
M.E. 3; Draw. 1, 2
Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4
Economics 53
E.E. 2a; Physics 46
Drawing 3

West LEcture, Physics: Philippson.
Diamond, Gaiss, Graf.
1035 A.H.: Striedieck, Van Duren.

'round the corner on State

IIII

11

*This may be used as an irregular period provided there is no con-
flict with the regular schedule above.

- -
i
20% WOOL, 5% SILK
You can enjoy those co
a rating winter sports witha
greater degree of comnfor whien
you are fully protected agaist
cold with these '"Ru) Hois"
sports suits. In red only.s
Briefs . . . . . 79c
Tights . . . . . 1.50
Shirts . . . . . 1.00
All-in-one . . . 2.50
One-piece Sleepers . 2.50
with feet attached

';3'r: r ;.

-----4-------,

Fr-

I

February 14 .. .
TWO mportaut
Evemts
1. J-HOP is the big dance
of.the year. All she'll need

,OP

to make her evening com-
plete is a beautiful corsage.
Order yours now.
2. On VALENTINE'S DAY
no gift is more thrilling or
appreciated than FLOWERS.

- -'- - --- =

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